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Directory 



Note: 

All numbers are in area code 706. 

Graduate School: 

Boyd Graduate Studies Research Center; 
Graduate Admissions; 542-1787 
Records & Graduation Office; 542-4803 
Business Office; 542-4798 

Bookstore, University: 

Sanford Drive; 542-3171 

Career Services Center: 

Clark Howell Hall; 542-3375 

Fees Payment: 

Business Services Building; 542-1625 

Financial Aid: 

220 Academic Building; 542-6147 

Graduate Student Association: 

542-4792 

Health Service: 

University Health Center; 542-1 162 



Housing Office: 

Russell Hall; 542-1421 

Libraries: 

Main Library, North Campus; 542-3256 
Science Library, Boyd Graduate Studies 
Research Center; 542-4535 

Office of International Education 

217 Barrow Hall; 542-7903 

Parking Services: 

Perimeter Parking Lot; 542-7275 

Registrar: 

105 Academic Building; 542-4040 

Student Activities: 

Tate Student Center; 542-7774 

Student Affairs, Office of the Vice 
President for: 

201 Academic Building; 542-3564 

Tate Student Center: 

Information; 542-38 1 6 



II you have a disability and need assistance in order to obtain this bulletin in an alternative format, 
please contact the Oil ice of Graduate Admissions at (706) 542-1739. 




UNIVERSITY OF GEORGI 

ADUATE BULLETIN 



Pursuant to directives of the President of this institution, the University of Georgia 
continues its affirmative implementation of equal opportunity to employees, 
students, covered contractors and vendors, and applicants for employment, 
admission, or contractor/vendor status. The University of Georgia will act in matters of 
employment, admissions, programs, and services free of prohibited bias with regard to race, 
creed, color, sex, national origin, religion, age, veteran status, or disability. Further, the 
University of Georgia will not maintain racially segregated facilities. 

Continuation of the above policies is consistent with applicable provisions of the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964, the Education Amendments of 1972, Executive Order 1 1246, Revised 
Order 4, the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, the Rehabilitation Act of 
1973, and The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as revised and/or amended, with 
implementing regulations. Accordingly, this institution will not discriminate in employment, 
admissions, programs, or services with regard to any position for which the applicant, 
employee, or student is qualified and will make reasonable accommodation for physical and 
mental limitations. 

The Affirmative Action Plan implementing the above body of law, regulation, and policy 
is administered by Claude-Leonard Davis, Director of the UGA Equal Opportunity Office 
at 3 Peabody Hall, Athens, Georgia 30602-1622. Telephone inquiries concerning this Plan 
may be directed to (706) 542-7912. Copies of this Plan are available for inspection in the 
Equal Opportunity Office and in the UGA Main Library during normal weekday working 
hours. 

While every effort is made to provide accurate and current information, the University 
reserves the right to change, without notice, statements in the bulletin concerning rules, 
policies, fees, curricula, courses, calendar, or other matters. Students enrolled at the Univer- 
sity agree to comply with the University's rules and regulations and to accommodate to any 
changes necessary. Further, the statements set forth in this bulletin are for informational 
purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a student .\nd 
the institution. 



The University of Georgia: A Unii of the University System <> f Georgia 



Table of Contents 



Academic Calendar, 2000-2001 4 

Campus Map 6 

Campus Map Key 8 

The University System of Georgia 10 

Institutions of the University System 

of Georgia 1 1 

Board of Regents 12 

Officers and Staff 12 

The University of Georgia 13 

Officers of General Administration 1 3 

Colleges and Schools 14 
Administrative Officers of the 

Graduate School 14 

General University Information 16 

History 16 

The University of Georgia 16 

The Graduate School 16 

Mission 17 

Accreditation 1 8 

Admission 18 

Entrance Tests 1 8 

Retention of Records 19 

Immunization Requirements 19 

International Applicants 19 

Application for Readmission 19 

Change of Degree Objective 20 

Classification of Graduate Students 20 

Admission and Registration of 

Persons 62 Years of Age or Older 20 

Registration 21 

Course Load 2 1 

Course Numbers 21 

Enrollment in Graduate Courses 

Law/Undergraduate Students 22 

Irregular Students 22 

Grading Reporting System 22 

Special Instructional Programs 23 

Combined Degree Programs 23 

Study Abroad/Exchange Programs 23 

Cortona Program 24 

Volcani Program for Graduate Students 

from the College of Agricultural 

and Environmental Sciences 24 

Cooperative Education 24 



Academic Regulations and Procedures 


24 


Use of Credit 


24 


Cumulative Graduate Average 


24 


Extension and Correspondence 


24 


Resident Credit in Graduate Centers 


24 


Application for Graduation 


25 


Final Registration Requirement 


25 


Graduation Exercises 


25 


Awarding Doctoral Degrees 




University Faculty 


25 


Probation and Dismissal 


25 


Appeals 


26 


Student Education Records 


26 


Academic Honesty 


27 


Research with Human Participants 


27 


Student Services 


27 


Housing 


27 


Food Services 


27 


Transportation 


28 


University Health Center 


28 


Career Services Center 


28 


Disability Services 


28 


Campus Security 


29 


Financial Information 


29 


Expenses 


29 


Fee Refunds/Repayments 


29 


Academic Common Market 


30 


Classification of Students for 




Tuition Purposes 


30 


Financial Assistance and Awards 


31 


General University Awards 


31 


Departmental Assistantships 




and Awards 


32 


Graduate Research Facilities 


40 


Centers and Institutes* 


40 


Research Organizations 


46 


Libraries 


48 


Museums 


49 


The State Botanical Gardes 




of Georgia 


49 


General Degrees 


52 


Master of AltS and Master of Science 


52 


Doctor of Philosophy 


53 


Interdisciplinary Program 


57 



Graduate School De$t riptum <>/ ( 'ounex I 



Professional Degrees 


60 


Master s Degrees 


60 


Program Descriptions 


61 


Master of Accountancy 


61 


Master of Agricultural Economics 


61 


Master of Agricultural Extension 


61 


Master of Applied Mathematical 




Science 


61 


Master of Art Education 


62 


Master of Arts for Teachers 


62 


Master of Avian Medicine 


62 


Master of Business Administration 


63 


Master of Education 


64 


Master of Fine Arts 


64 


Master of Forest Resources 


64 


Master of Historic Preservation 


65 


Accelerated Master of 




Historic Preservation 


65 


Master of Home Economics 


65 


Master of Landscape Architecture 


65 


Master of Laws 


65 


Master of Marketing Research 


66 


Master of Mass Communication 


66 


Master of Music 


66 


Master of Music Education 


66 


Master of Plant Protection 




and Pest Management 


67 


Master of Public Administration 


67 


Master of Social Work 


67 


Specialist in Education 


67 


Doctor of Education 


69 


Cooperative Doctoral Programs 


71 


Doctor of Musical Arts 


72 


Doctor of Public Administration 


75 


Certification of Professional Personnel 


78 


Certificate Programs 


78 


Course Listings 


85 


Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 




The College of 


86 


Agricultural and Applied Economics 


86 


Agricultural Extension 


89 


Agriculture Extension 


89 


Agriculture Leadership 


89 


Agriculture 


90 


Animal and Dairy Science 


90 


Animal Nutrition 


92 


Biological and Agricultural 




Engineering 


93 


Crop and Soil Sciences 


96 


Entomology 


100 


Environmental Health Science 


102 


Food Science and Technology 


104 


Horticulture 


107 


Plant Pathology 


109 


Poultry Science 


111 



Arts and Sciences, Franklin College of 113 

African American Studies 1 1 3 

Anthropology 114 

Art 118 

Art 119 

Art History 1 20 

Art Interior Design 123 

Studio Art 123 

Artificial Intelligence 126 

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 126 

Biology 129 

Botany 130 

Cellular Biology 133 

Chemistry 135 

Classics 138 

Classical Culture 139 

Greek 141 

Latin 142 

Comparative Literature 143 

Japanese 145 

Computer Science 145 

Drama and Theatre 1 50 

Ecology 153 

English 157 

Environmental Ethics 161 

Genetics 162 

Geography 1 64 

Human and Regional Geography 165 

Physical Geography 167 

Geographic Techniques and Methods 168 

Geology 169 

Germanic and Slavic Languages 174 

German 175 

Russian 176 

Gerontology 1 76 

Global Policy Studies 176 

History 177 

Linguistics 182 

Marine Sciences 188 

Mathematics 189 

Microbiology 195 

Music 198 

Philosophy 202 

Physics and Astronomy 205 

Physics 206 

Astronomy 208 

Political Science 209 

Psychology 214 

Religion 220 

Religion 220 

Arabic 223 

Hebrew 223 

Semitic 223 

Romance Languages 223 

French 224 

Italian 225 



2 / The University of Georgia 



Portuguese 

Romance 

Spanish 
Sociology 

Speech Communication 
Statistics 
Women's Studies 
Business, The C. Herman and 
Mary Virginia Terry College of 
Accounting 
Banking and Finance 

Management Sciences and 

Information Technology 
Economics 
Insurance, Legal Studies, and 

Real Estate 

Risk Management and Insurance 

Legal Studies 

Real Estate 
Management 

Management Information Systems 
Marketing and Distribution 
Education, College of 
Adult Education 
Art Education 
Communication Sciences 

and Disorders 
Counseling and Human 

Development Services 
Educational Leadership 
Educational Psychology 

Educational Psychology 

Educational Research and 
Measurement 
Elementary Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Elementary Education 

Middle School Education 
Health and Human Performance 

Exercise Science 

Health Promotion and Behavior 

Physical Education and 
Sport Studies 

Recreation and Leisure Studies 
Higher Education 
Instructional Technology 
Language Education 
Mathematics Education 
Music Education 
Occupational Studies 

Agricultural Education 

Business Education 



225 


Family and Consumer Sciences 




226 


Education 


301 


226 


Marketing Education 


301 


227 


Occupational Studies 


302 


230 


Technological Studies 


303 


232 


Reading Education 


304 


236 


Science Education 


306 




Social Foundations of Education 


308 


238 


Social Science Education 


310 


239 


Social Work Education 


311 


241 


Special Education 


312 




Environmental Design, The School of 


314 


243 


Environmental Design 


315 


244 


Historic Preservation 


316 




Landscape Architecture 


317 


247 


Family and Consumer Sciences, 




247 


The College of 


319 


248 


Child and Family Development 


319 


248 


Institute on Human Development 




249 


and Disability 


323 


252 


Foods and Nutrition 


323 


254 


Housing and Consumer Economics 


325 


257 


Textiles, Merchandising, and 




257 


Interiors 


327 


259 


Forest Resources, The Daniel B. 






Warnell School of 


331 


261 


Graduate School 

Journalism and Mass Communication, 


338 


264 


The Henry W. Grady College of 


339 


271 


Advertising and Public Relations 


339 


273 


Journalism 


340 


273 


Journalism Core 


341 




Journalism and Mass Communication 


341 


276 


Pharmacy, The College of 


343 


278 


Social Work, The School of 


347 


278 


Veterinary Medicine, The College of 


351 


280 


Avian Medicine 


351 


281 


Large Animal Medicine 


352 


283 


Medical Microbiology and 




283 


Parasitology 


353 


285 


Medical Microbiology 


353 




Parasitology 


354 


287 


Pathology 


355 


289 


Physiology and Pharmacology 


356 


291 


Small Animal Medicine 


358 


292 


Veterinary Anatomy and Radiology 


358 


294 


Veterinary Medicine 


360 


297 


Graduate Faculty 


361 



299 
300 
300 
300 



Appendix: Prefix Abbreviations 402 

Index 404 



Academic Calendar 2000-2001 



2000 Fall Semester 



Residence Halls Open Aug. 13, Su 

Graduate Student Orientation Aug. 14, M 

Late Registration Aug. 16, W 

Classes Begin Aug. 17, Th 

Drop/Add Aug. 17-21, Th-M 

Holiday (Labor Day) Sept. 4, M 

Midpoint of Semester Oct. 10, Tu 

Fall Break Oct. 26-24, W-F 

Thanksgiving Recess Nov. 22-24, W-F 

Classes Resume Nov. 27, M 



Classes End 




Dec. 7, Th 


Reading Day 




Dec. 8, F 


Final Exams 




Dec. 11-15, M-F 


Commencement 




Dec. 16, Sa 


2001 


Spring 


Semester 


Residence Halls Open 




Jan. 2, Tu 


Late Registration 




Jan. 5, F 


Classes Begin 




Jan. 8, M 


Drop/Add 




Jan. 8-10, M-W 


Holiday (MLK Day) 




Jan. 15, M 


Midpoint of Semester 




Mar. l,Th 


Spring Break 




Mar. 19-23, M-F 


Classes Resume 




Mar. 26, M 


Classes End 




Apr. 30, M 


Reading Day 




May 1 , Tu 


Final Exams 




May 245, W-F & 7-8, M-Tu 


Commencement 




May 12, Sa 


4 / The University of Georgia 







2001 Summer Semester 



Pre-Summer Session 

Note: Classes meet for 150 minutes daily, 14 days of classes 

Residence Halls Open May 13, Su 

Late Registration May 15, Tu 

Classes Begin May 16, W 

Drop/Add Mayl7,Th 

Midpoint of Session May 24, Th 

Holiday (Memorial Day) May 28, M 

Classes End June 5, Tu 

Final Exams June 6, W 

Long Session 

Note: Classes meet for 60 minutes daily, 38 days of classes 

Residence Halls Open June 3, Su 

Late Registration June 6, W 

Classes Begin June 7, Th 

Drop/Add June 7-11, Th-M 

Midpoint of Session July 3, Th 

Holiday July 4, W 

Classes End July 31, Tu 

Final Exams Aug. 1-3, W-F 

Short Session I 

Note: Classes meet for 120 minutes daily, 19 days of classes 

Residence Halls Open June 3, Su 

Late Registration June 6,W 

Classes Begin June 7, Th 

Drop/Add June 7-11, Th-M 

Midpoint of Session June 20, W 

Classes End July 3, Tu 

Holiday July 4, W 

Final Exams July 5, Th 

Short Session II 

Note: Classes meet for 120 minutes daily, 19 days of classes 

Late Registration July 5, Th 

Classes Begin July 6, F 

Drop/Add July 6, 9, F, M 

Midpoint of Session July 18, W 

Classes End July 3 1 , Tu 

Final Exams Aug. 1-3, W-F 

Note: This Calendar is correct as of the date of this publication. The Calendar may be subject to 
change during the next year. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes and/or other special an- 
nouncements that may be forthcoming. 



l.r,>.U.n,r Ri.llst.n /S 




6 / The University <<*, i 




JT J n K n L n M 



Iht University oj Georgia Graduate Hulletin/1 



Campus Map Key 



Academic/0120, 8-B 

Aderhold Hall/1060, 3-K 

Alpha Chi Omega Sorority/2218, 6-L 

Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity/2232, 2-1 

Alpha Psi/2255, 4-0 

Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity/2234, 3-H 

Alumni House/1661, 5-N 

Automotive Center/ 1634, 2-F 

Baldwin Hall/0050, 5-D 

Baptist Student Union/2603, 7-F 

Barrow Hall/1021, 4-1 

Baseball Stadium/1685, 5-P 

Benson Building/ 1646/6-M 

Biological Sciences/ 1000, 4-H 

Bishop House/0032, 6-B 

Boggs Hall/22 16, 6- J 

Bolton Hall/2210, 8-1 

Boyd Graduate Studies/1023, 4-J 

Brooks Hall/2213, 10-M 

Brumby Hall/2213, 10M 

Business Services/0110, 6- A 

Business Services Annex/0121, 6-A 

Butts-Mehre/1671,6-P 

Caldwell Hall/0046, 7-D 

Campus Mail Building/2118, G-l 

Candler Hall/0031, 7-C 

Catholic Student Center/2613, 7-P 

Chapel/0022, 7-B 

Chemistry/1001, 5-H 

Chi Phi Fraternity/2200, 8-C 

Chi Psi Fraternity/2202, 8-D 

Child Development Laboratory /1 652, 4-L 

Church Hall/221 5, 6-J 

Clark Howell Hall/0290, 6-H 

Coliseum/ 1654, 5-M 

Conner Hall/1011, 4-H 

Cooperative Extension Service/ 1043/6-M 

Creswell Hall/221 1,8-J 

Dairy Research Building/2840, 2-M 

Dairy Science/ 1050, 4-K 

Dawson Hall/1 010, 5-J 

Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority /22 1 9, 7-P 

Demosthenian Hall/0021, 7-B 

Denmark Hall/0040, 7-D 

8 / The University of Georgia 



Driftmier Engineering Center/ 1090, 3-M 

Ecology Building/1033, 3-J 

Electronics Shop/ 1632, 3-J 

Family Housing, University Village/2221, 2-N 

Family Housing, Rogers Road/2242, 2-P 

Family Housing Office/2238, 2-P 

Fine Arts/0060, 6-F 

Food Science/ 1020, 3-H 

Forest Resources- 1/1040, 3-K 

Forest Resources-2/1 140, 3-K 

Forest Resources-3/1044, 3-K 

Forest Resources-4/1046, 3-K 

Garden Club of Georgia/0650, 7-E 

Geography, Geology/ 1002, 5-H 

Geology Hydrothermal Laboratory/0090, 5-H 

Georgia Center/ 1640, 5-L 

Georgia Museum of Art/0631, 6-B 

Georgia Retardation Center/2639, 3-E 

Gilbert Health Center/0640, 7-C 

Greenhouses, PAT, HOR, AGR/2410, 2-F 

Greenhouse Botany/2415, 2-F 

Greenhouse A-N, PHR, HOR/1340, 4-L 

Greenhouse 1-N, PHR, PAT/ 1350, 4-L 

Greenhouse 2-N, PHR, PAT/1351, 4-L 

Greenhouse 3-N, PHR, HOR/ 1352, 4-L 

Hardman Hall/1031, 4-J 

Henry Feild Tennis Stadium/2622, 4-0 

Hill Hall/2214, 6-1 

Hodgson House/2609, 6-J 

Hoke Smith Annex/ 1042, 5-M 

Home Management Houses/ 1246, 4-L 

Human Resources/0620, 6-B 

Industrial Arts/ 1082, 3-M 

Instructional Plaza (N-S Aud.)/1066, 5-E 

Intramural Field/2607, 2-N 

Joe Brown Hall/0250, 7-E 

Journalism/0062, 5-E 

Kappa Alpha Fraternity/2201, 8-D 

Kappa Sigma Fraternity/2233, 3-H 

Lake Herrick Pavilion/2440, 1-N 

Law Library Annex/0043, 7-C 

Law School/0043, 6-C 

LeConte Hall/0053, 5-D 

Legion Pool/2604, 7-1 



Library, Main/0054, 6-D 

Library, Science/ 1621, 4- J 

Life Sciences Building/ 1057, 3-J 

Lipscomb Hall/2208, 7-H 

Livestock-Poultry/1013, 4-H 

Lumpkin St., 1260 S./2635, 6-0 

Lumpkin St., 1242 ' S./2627, 6-0 

Lumpkin St., 1280 S./2636, 6-0 

Lumpkin St., 1240 S./2628, 6-0 

Lumpkin St., 1088 S./2119, 6-L 

Lumpkin House/1012, 4-H 

Lustrat House/0632, 6-C 

Lutheran Student Center/2610, 6-K 

Mary Lyndon Hall/1221, 5-K 

McWhorter Hall/ 1 280, 3-N 

Meigs Hall/0024, 8-B 

Mell Hall/2209, 7-1 

Memorial Hall/0670, 5-F 

Military, Army ROTC/0061, 6-F 

Milledge Hall/0271, 4-E 

Miller Plant Sciences/ 1061, 3-L 

Moore College/0025, 7-C 

Morris Hall/2204, 7-E 

Myers Hall/1222, 5-K 

Myers Quadrangle/1223, 5-K 

New College/0030, 7-C 

Oglethorpe House/2217, 6-K 

Old College/0130, 6-C 

Park Hall/0056, 6-E 

Parking Deck, East Campus/1698, 2-K 

Parking Deck, South Campus/1 139, 5-K 

Parking Deck, West Campus/2136, 1-K 

Parking Services/2133, 2-J 

Payne Hall/0270, 4-E 

Peabody Hall/0042, 6-C 

People's Park/2135, 8-M 

Performance Center/ 1692, 2-J 

Phi Delta Theta Fraternity/2206, 7-G 

Phi Kappa Hall/0020, 7- A 

Physical Education/ 1030, 4-J 

Physics/1003,5-1 

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity/2203, 7-E 

Poultry Disease Research/2300, 3-C 

Poultry Research Laboratory, S. E./2699, 2-E 

Practice Field/261 5, 6-N 



Presbyterian Student Center/2612, 6-N 

Psychology/0064, 5-E 

Public Safety/01 80, 6-G 

Ramsey Student Center for Physical 

Activities/ 1690, 2-L 
Recording for the Blind/2614, 8-F 
Reed Hall/0280, 4-F 
Russell Hall/2212, 9-K 
Russell Research Center/2646, 1-D 
Rutherford Hall/1210, 5-J 
Sanford Stadium/0686, 4-G 
School of Music/1691, 2-J 
SE Environmental Research Lab/2698, 2-C 
SE Poultry Research Lab/2699, 2-E 
SE Region Poultry Genetics Lab/4051, 1-B 
Sigma Chi Fraternity/2205, 7-G 
Sigma Delta Tau Sorority/2220, 7-P 
Sigma Nu Fraternity/2237, 3-H 
Snelling Hall/1643, 4-K 
Soule Hall/ 1220, 5-J 
Staff Training and Development 

Center/2685, 5-B 
Swine Arthritis Research/2320, 3-D 
Tate Student Center/0672, 5-G 
Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity/2207, 7-G 
Tennis Courts-Indoor/2623, 4-N 
Tennis Hall of Fame/1670, 4-0 
Terrell Hall/0023, 7-B 
Thomas Street, South/2600, 5-A 
Thomas Street Art Studio/2606, 5-A 
Treanor House/1657, 6-M 
Tucker Hall/1250, 2-J 
U.S. Forest Service/1550, 3-K 
U.S. Forest Service Annex/ 1551, 3-K 
UGA Golf Course/2650, 1-P 
University Bookstore/0671, 5-F 
Veterinary Farm/2351, 1-N 
Veterinary Medicine Complex/ 1070, 3-M 
Visitors and Information Center/2835, L-2 
Visual Arts/0040, 5-C 
Visual Arts Annex/0026, 6-B 
Waddel Hall/0041, 6-C 
Wesley Foundation/261 1, 6-M 
Wilson Pharmacy/ 1041, 4-K 



The University of Georgia Graduate Hi,. ■ K> 



The University System of Georgia 



The University System of Georgia includes 34 
state-sponsored, public institutions located 
throughout Georgia 4 comprehensive and spe- 
cial purpose universities, 2 regional universities, 
13 state universities and colleges, and 15 two-year 
colleges. 

A 15-member constitutional Board of Regents 
one from each of the state's 1 1 Congressional 
Districts and five from the state-at-large governs 
the University System, which was established in 
1932. Board members are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor, subject to state senate confirmation, for 
seven-year terms. 

The Chairperson, the Vice Chairperson, and 
other officers of the Board are elected by its 
membership. The Chancellor, who is not a 
Board member, is the chief executive officer of 
the Board and chief administrative officer of the 
University System. 

The overall programs and services of the Uni- 
versity System are offered through three major 
components: Instruction, Public Service/Contin- 
uing Education, Research. 

Board of Regents' policies for government, 
management, and control of the University Sys- 
tem and the Chancellor's administrative actions 
provide institutions a high degree of autonomy. 
The President is the executive head of each in- 
stitution and is recommended by the Chancellor 
and appointed by the Board. 

The University System Advisory Council, 
with 34 committees, engenders continual dia- 
logue on major academic and administrative 
matters and makes recommendations to the 
Chancellor, who transmits them to the Board as 
appropriate, regarding academic and administra- 
tive operations in the System. The Council con- 
sists of the Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor, and 
all Presidents as voting members. It includes 
other officials of institutions as nonvoting 
members. The Council's 21 academic and 13 ad- 
ministrative committees are composed of insti- 
tutional representatives, typically one from each 



unit, and deal with matters of System-wide ap- 
plication. 

Matriculation fees and nonresident tuition 
fees for students at all institutions are estab- 
lished by the Board of Regents. All students pay 
matriculation fees while out-of-state students 
pay nonresident tuition in addition. Other fees 
for student services and activities are established 
by institutions, subject to Board of Regents' ap- 
proval. Non-mandatory fees established by insti- 
tutions are subject to approval of the Board of 
Regents office. 



10 / The University of Georgia 



Institutions of the University System of Georgia 



Comprehensive and Special 
Purpose Universities 

Athens 

The University of Georgia 
Atlanta 

Georgia Institute of Technology 

Georgia State University 
Augusta 

Medical College of Georgia 

State and Regional Universities 

Albany 

Albany State University 
Americus 

Georgia Southwestern State University 
Augusta 

Augusta State University 
Carrollton 

State University of West Georgia 
Columbus 

Columbus State University 
Dahlonega 

North Georgia College and State University 
Fort Valley 

Fort Valley State University 
Marietta 

Kennesaw State University 

Southern Polytechnic State University 
Milledgeville 

Georgia College and State University 
Morrow 

Clayton College and State University 
Savannah 

Armstrong Atlantic State University 

Savannah State University 
Statesboro 

Georgia Southern University 
Valdosta 

Valdosta State University 



Two- Year Colleges 

Albany 

Darton State College 
Atlanta 

Atlanta Metropolitan College 
Bainbridge 

Bainbridge College 
Barnesville 

Gordon College 
Brunswick 

Coastal Georgia Community College 
Cochran 

Middle Georgia College 
Dalton 

Dalton College 
Decatur 

Georgia Perimeter College 
Douglas 

South Georgia College 
Gainesville 

Gainesville College 
Macon 

Macon College 
Rome 

Floyd College 
Swainsboro 

East Georgia College 
Tifton 

Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College 
Waycross 

Waycross College 



University System of Georgia 

244 Washington Street. SW 

Atlanta, Georgia 30334-1450 



The ( nn < / wr\ ,-/ < ,, orgia Graduate Bulletin / 1 1 



Board of Regents 

Thomas F. Allgood, Sr., Augusta 
Juanita P. Baranco, Lithonia 
Kenneth W. Cannestra, Atlanta 
Connie Cater, Macon 
J. Tom Coleman, Savannah 
Joe Frank Harris, Cartersville 
Hilton Hatchett Howell, Jr., Atlanta 
John Hunt, Tifton 
Edgar L. Jenkins, Jasper 
Charles H. Jones, Macon 
Donald M. Leebern, Jr., Columbus 
Elridge W. McMillan, Atlanta 
Martin W. NeSmith, Claxton 
Glenn S. White, Lawrenceville 
Joel O. Wooten, Jr., Columbus 
James D. Yancey, Columbus 



Officers and Staff 

Kenneth W. Cannestra, Chair 

J. Tom Coleman, Jr., Vice Chair 

Stephen R. Portch, Chancellor 

Arthur N. Dunning, Senior Vice Chancellor- 
Human and External Resources 

Thomas E. Daniel, Vice Chancellor- 
External Affairs 

Lindsay Desrochers, Senior Vice Chancellor- 
Capital Resources/Treasurer 

Beheruz Sethna, Senior Vice Chancellor- 
Academic Affairs (Interim) 

William K. Chatham, Vice Chancellor- 
Facilities 

Barry A. Fullerton, Vice Chancellor — , 
Student Services 

E. Michael Staman, Vice Chancellor — 
Information/Instructional Technology/CIO 



12 / The University of Georgia 



The University of Georgia 



Officers of General 
Administration 

President 

Michael F. Adams 

Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 
and Provost 

Karen A. Holbrook 

Senior Vice President for Finance and 
Administration 

Allan W. Barber 

Senior Vice President for External Affairs 

Kathryn R. Costello 

Vice President for Public Service and Out- 
reach and Associate Provost 

Arthur N. Dunning 

Vice President for Research and Associate 
Provost 

Joe L. Key 



Vice President for Student Affairs 

Richard H. Mullendore 

Acting Vice President for Instruction and 
Associate Provost 

Thomas G. Dyer 

Vice President for Strategic Planning and 
Public Affairs 

Donald R. Eastman, III 

Vice President for Government Relations 

Lawrence E. Weatherford 

Director of the Honors Program and 
Associate Provost 

Jere W. Morehead 

Associate Provost for International Studies 

David L. Coker 



l lu I iUversit> at Georgia Graduate Bulletin , 13 



Colleges and Schools 

College of Arts and Sciences (1801) 

School of Art 

School of Music 

Wyatt W. Anderson, Dean 
College of Agricultural and 

Environmental Sciences (1859) 

Gale A. Buchanan, Dean 
School of Law (1859) 

David E. Shipley, Dean 
College of Pharmacy (1903) 

Svein 0ie, Dean 
Daniel B. Warnell School of Forest 

Resources (1906) 

Arnett C. Mace, Jr., Dean 
College of Education (1908) 

Louis A. Castenell, Jr., Dean 
Graduate School (1910) 

Gordhan L. Patel, Dean 
C. Herman and Mary Virginia Terry 

College of Business (1912) 

J.M. Tkill School of Accounting (1977) 

P. George Benson, Dean 
Henry W. Grady College of Journalism 

and Mass Communication (1915) 

John Thomas Russell, Dean 
College of Family and Consumer 

Sciences (1933) 

Sharon Y. Nickols, Dean 
College of Veterinary Medicine (1946) 

Keith W. Prasse, Dean 
School of Social Work (1964) 

Bonnie L. Yegidis, Dean 
School of Environmental Design (1969) 

John Francis Crowley, HI, Dean 



Administrative Officers of 
the Graduate School 

Gordhan L. Patel, A.B., Ph.D., Dean 
F. Douglas Boudinot, B.S., Ph.D., 

Associate Dean 
Thomas W. Hodler, B.S., M.A.T., Ph.D., 

Associate Dean 
Josie B. Bumgarner, B.B.A., 

Assistant to the Dean 
Janet A. Sandor, B.A., B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D. 

Director of Graduate Admissions 
Krista Haynes, A.B., 

Graduate Program Administrator 
Curtis D. Byrd, B.S., M.Ed., 

Director, Recruitment and Retention 



14 / The University of Georgia 



GENERAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION 




General University Information 



History 

The University of Georgia 

When the University of Georgia was incorpo- 
rated by an act of the General Assembly on Jan- 
uary 27, 1785, Georgia became the first state to 
charter a state- supported university. In 1784 the 
General Assembly had set aside 40,000 acres of 
land to endow a college or seminary of learning. 

At the first meeting of the board of trustees, 
held in Augusta on February 13, 1786, Abraham 
Baldwin was selected president of the Univer- 
sity. Baldwin, a native of Connecticut and a 
graduate of Yale University who had come to 
Georgia in 1784, drafted the charter adopted by 
the General Assembly. 

The University was actually established in 
1801 when a committee of the board of trustees 
selected a land site. John Milledge, later a gov- 
ernor of the state, purchased and gave to the 
board of trustees the chosen tract of 633 acres on 
the banks of the Oconee River in northeast 
Georgia. 

Josiah Meigs was named president of the Uni- 
versity and work was begun on the first build- 
ing, originally called Franklin College in honor 
of Benjamin Franklin and now known as Old 
College. The University graduated its first class 
in 1804. 

The curriculum of traditional classical studies 
was broadened in 1843 to include courses in 
law, and again in 1872 when the University re- 
ceived federal funds for instruction in agricul- 
ture and mechanical arts. 

Thirteen schools and colleges, with auxiliary 
divisions, carry on the University's programs of 
teaching, research and service. These colleges 
and schools and the dates of their establishment 
as separate administrative units are: Franklin 
College of Arts and Sciences, 1801; College of 
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 1859; 
School of Law, 1859; College of Pharmacy, 
1903; D. B. Warnell School of Forest Resources, 



16 / The University of Georgia 



1906; College of Education, 1908; Graduate 
School, 1910; C. Herman and Mary Virginia 
Terry College of Business, 1912; Henry W. 
Grady College of Journalism and Mass Commu- 
nication, 1915; College of Family and Con- 
sumer Sciences, 1933; College of Veterinary 
Medicine, 1946; School of Social Work, 1964; 
School of Environmental Design, 1969. The Di- 
vision of General Extension, now the Georgia 
Center for Continuing Education, was incorpo- 
rated into the University in 1947. 

In 1931 the General Assembly of Georgia 
placed all state- supported institutions of higher 
education, including The University of Georgia, 
under the jurisdiction of a single board. This or- 
ganization, known as the University System of 
Georgia, is governed by the Board of Regents. 
The Board of Regents' executive officer, the 
chancellor, exercises a general supervisory con- 
trol over all institutions of the University Sys- 
tem, with each institution having its own 
executive officers and faculty. 

The Graduate School 

Prior to the formal establishment of the Gradu- 
ate School, courses of postgraduate status were 
offered under the control of a faculty committee 
on graduate studies. In 1910, the formal organi- 
zation of graduate studies into a Graduate 
School was authorized. Dr. Willis H. Bocock 
served as the Graduate School's first dean and 
was succeeded by R. P. Stephens, George H. 
Boyd, Gerald B. Huff, Thomas H. Whitehead, 
Hardy M. Edwards, Jr., John C. Dowling, and 
the present dean, Gordhan L. Patel. 

The Graduate School coordinates the graduate 
programs of all schools and colleges of the Uni- 
versity. Matters of policy and procedure are de- 
termined by the graduate faculty through the 
graduate council. The graduate faculty consists 
of faculty members appointed by the President 
on the basis of productive research, effective 
teaching, and other creative activities. The poli 






cies adopted by the graduate council are admin- 
istered by the dean of the Graduate School. 

The traditional degrees, Master of Arts and 
Master of Science, are offered in 26 and 42 dis- 
ciplines, respectively. The Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degree is offered in 74 disciplines. The 
University also offers professional master's de- 
grees in 22 areas, the Specialist in Education 
degree in 21 fields, and professional doctoral 
degrees in education, music, and public admin- 
istration. 

Mission 

The University of Georgia, a land-grant and sea- 
grant university with state-wide commitments 
and responsibilities, is the state's oldest, most 
comprehensive, and most diversified institution 
of higher education. Its motto, "to teach, to 
serve, and to inquire into the nature of things," 
reflects the University's integral and unique role 
in the conservation and enhancement of state's 
and nation's intellectual, cultural, and environ- 
mental heritage. The University of Georgia 
shares with the other research universities of the 
University System of Georgia the following core 
characteristics: 

1 . a statewide responsibility and commitment 
to excellence and academic achievements 
having national and international recogni- 
tion; 

2. a commitment to excellence in a teach- 
ing/learning environment dedicated to 
serve a diverse and well-prepared study 
body, to promote high levels of student 
achievement, and to provide appropriate 
academic support services; 

3. a commitment to excellence in research, 
scholarship, and creative endeavors that 
are focused on organized programs to cre- 
ate, maintain, and apply new knowledge 
and theories; that promote instructional 
quality and effectiveness; and that enhance 
institutionally relevant faculty qualifica- 
tions; 

4. a commitment to excellence in public ser- 
vice, economic development, and techni- 
cal assistance activities designed to 
address the strategic needs of the State of 
Georgia along with a comprehensive offer- 
ing of continuing education designed to 
meet the needs of Georgia's citizens in 
life-long learning and professional educa- 
tion; 



5. a wide range of academic and professional 
programming at the baccalaureate, mas- 
ter's and doctoral levels. 

With its statewide mission and core character- 
istics, the University of Georgia endeavors to 
prepare the University community and the state 
for full participation in the global society of the 
twenty-first century. Through its programs and 
practices, it seeks to foster the understanding of 
and respect for cultural differences necessary for 
an enlightened and educated citizenry. It further 
provides for cultural, ethnic, gender, and racial 
diversity in the faculty, staff, and student body. 
The University is committed to preparing the 
University community to appreciate the critical 
importance of a quality environment to an inter- 
dependent global society. 

As a comprehensive land-grant and sea-grant 
institution, the University of Georgia offers bac- 
calaureate, master s, doctoral and professional 
degrees in the arts, humanities, social sciences, 
biological sciences, physical sciences, agricul- 
tural and environmental sciences, business, edu- 
cation, environmental design, family and 
consumer sciences, forest resources, journalism 
and mass communication, law, pharmacy, social 
work, and veterinary medicine. 

The University attracts students nationally 
and internationally as well as from within Geor- 
gia. It offers the state's broadest array of possi- 
bilities in graduate and professional education, 
and thus a large minority of the student body is 
post-baccalaureate. The predominantly Geor- 
gian undergraduate student body is a mix of 
highly qualified students originally admitted as 
freshmen and selected transfer students princi- 
pally from other University System institutions. 

With original scholarship, basic and applied 
research, and creative activities constituting an 
essential core from which to draw, the impact of 
the land-grant and sea-grant mission is reflected 
throughout the state. Cooperative extension, 
continuing education, public service, experi- 
ment stations, and technology transfer are all de- 
signed to enhance the well-being of the citizens 
of Georgia through their roles in economic, so- 
cial, and community development. 

As it has been historically, the University of 
Georgia is responsive to the evolution of the 
state's educational, social, and economic needs. 
It aspires through its strategic planning to even 
closer contact and interaction with public and 
private institutions throughout the state as well 
as with the citizens it serves. 



Graduate School General Information / 17 



Accreditation 

The University of Georgia is accredited by the 
Commission on Colleges of the Southern Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor s, 
master s, the Specialist in Education, and doctoral 
degrees. In addition, a number of the University's 
13 colleges and schools are further accredited by 
appropriate educational associations. 

Admission 

Correspondence concerning admission to the 
Graduate School should be addressed to the Of- 
fice of Graduate Admissions, The University of 
Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-7402, Email 
gradadm@arches.uga.edu or www.gradsch.uga. 
edu/. Inquiries about facilities for advanced 
study and research, programs of study, and spe- 
cific departmental requirements should be ad- 
dressed to the appropriate department. 

Persons holding a bachelor's degree from any 
institution accredited by the appropriate regional 
accrediting association are eligible to apply for 
admission to the Graduate School. Applicants 
should have ranked in the upper half of their un- 
dergraduate class and should have completed the 
equivalent of an undergraduate major in the field 
in which they propose to study. Applicants are 
responsible for providing all application materi- 
als required for admission. These items include 
but are not limited to: the general application for 
admission, a $30 application-processing fee, 
transcripts, entrance test scores, letters of rec- 
ommendation, and any supplemental material 
required by the department. The application- 
processing fee is non-refundable and will not be 
credited toward the matriculation fee. Materials 
submitted in support of an application will not 
be returned. 

Applications and supporting credentials from 
domestic students must be received in the Office 
of Graduate Admissions by the following dead- 
lines: Fall semester, July 1 ; Spring semester, No- 
vember 15; Summer semester (pre-session), 
April 1; and Summer semester (all other ses- 
sions), May 1. Applicants are urged to apply as 
early as possible up to one year in advance of the 
desired matriculation date. All applicants should 
consult with the graduate coordinator of the spe- 
cific program for which they are making appli- 
cation to ascertain if the program adheres to an 
earlier application deadline. For information 
concerning deadlines for international applica- 
tions, refer to the section entitled International 
Applicants. 



Each completed application, with supporting 
materials, is forwarded to the department in which 
the applicant proposes to study, where it is consid- 
ered by the faculty of that department. No appli- 
cant will be admitted without the recommendation 
of an academic unit. Final consideration is given 
by the dean of the Graduate School. 

An applicant is admitted for a specific semes- 
ter. Applicants may not register unless they have 
been notified of their acceptance to the Graduate 
School by the Office of Graduate Admissions. 
Admission is valid only when the person regis- 
ters for the specified semester. The applicant, 
however, may request the Office of Graduate 
Admissions to defer his/her registration to an- 
other semester. Deferred applications are recon- 
sidered by the applicant's department. 

Entrance Tests 

Entrance test scores appropriate for each appli- 
cation must be sent to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions directly by the responsible testing 
agency. All test scores are subject to a five-year 
time limitation. 

Scores on the verbal and quantitative sections 
of the General Test of the Graduate Record Exam- 
inations (GRE) are required for admission as a 
prospective candidate for most graduate degrees. 
The Miller Analogies Test (MAT) may be used in 
lieu of scores on the GRE for admission to some 
Master of Education and Specialist in Education 
degree programs. The GMAT is required for ap- 
plicants seeking admission as prospective candi- 
dates for the Master of Business Administration 
and the Master of Accountancy degrees. Appli- 
cants for the Master of Marketing Research degree 
may submit either the GMAT or the GRE. The 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy pro- 
grams in business administration accept the 
GMAT or the GRE. The Master of Arts and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy programs in economics require 
the GRE. Either the GRE or GMAT may be sub- 
mitted in support of the MA in journalism and 
mass communication and the Master of Mass 
Communication (MMC) and PhD in mass com- 
munication. In all cases, applicants should consult 
the departments for information about specific test 
score requirements. Applicants who have been ad- 
mitted previously to a degree program and earned 
credit toward that degree at the University of 
Georgia may submit the same test scores in sup- 
port of an application for a new degree program. 
In this case, the scores are not subject to the five- 
year time limit but must meet the Graduate 
School's and department's minimum score re- 
quirement for the new program. 



18 / The University of Georgia 






The Graduate Record Examinations and the 
Graduate Management Admission Test are of- 
fered at numerous testing centers in the United 
States and abroad. Advance registration is re- 
quired. Registration forms and detailed informa- 
tion on the availability and character of each 
examination may be obtained by writing to the 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New 
Jersey 08541-6000 or at the following web ad- 
dress: www.ets.org. The Miller Analogies Test is 
given at various colleges and universities as ap- 
proved by The Psychological Corporation. For 
information concerning the test as given at the 
University of Georgia, contact the Office of 
Testing and Evaluation, Clark Howell Hall, 
(706) 542-3183. For information concerning 
other approved testing centers, contact The Psy- 
chological Corporation, 555 Academic Court, 
San Antonio, Texas 78204-2498. 

Retention of Records 

Applications and supporting documents for 
those who were denied admission, who were ac- 
cepted but failed to matriculate, or who did not 
complete the application procedure are retained 
in the Office of Graduate Admissions for a pe- 
riod of one year, after which they are discarded. 
Applications submitted without the applica- 
tion fee are not processed. Such applications are 
retained for one year. Transcripts, test scores, 
and any other information submitted without an 
application are retained for a period of one year. 

Immunization Requirements 

All new students attending University System of 
Georgia institutions must show proof of immu- 
nization for measles, mumps, and rubella. Im- 
munity may be verified by proof of (a) having 
had the disease, (b) having had the required im- 
munizations, or (c) having had laboratory evi- 
dence of immune titer. In compliance with this 
policy, all new students must complete a Uni- 
versity Health Center Report of Medical History 
form which will be sent by the Office of Gradu- 
ate Admissions at the time of acceptance. This 
form should be returned to the University Health 
Center at least two weeks prior to registration. 
Questions related to the certificate of immuniza- 
tion and/or the immunization policy should be 
directed to: The Medical Records Department. 
University Health Center, The University of 
Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-1755; telephone 
(706)542-8617. 



International Applicants 

Several months may be required to process an ap- 
plication from abroad; therefore, foreign nationals 
are urged to submit complete application materials 
as early as possible, but no more than one year in 
advance. The application must include the applica- 
tion form, two official transcripts (including proof 
of degree where applicable) from all colleges and 
universities attended, two official copies of test 
scores on an approved entrance test, a $30 non-re- 
fundable application fee, and three letters of rec- 
ommendation. If the original language of the 
academic record is not English, a certified English 
translation must accompany the official docu- 
ments. Recommendations from teachers who are 
familiar with higher education programs in the 
United States are advantageous. International ap- 
plicants, for whom English is not their native 
tongue, must submit Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) scores in addition to scores on 
an approved entrance examination. The applica- 
tion of a student from abroad, complete with sup- 
porting materials, must be in the Office of 
Graduate Admissions by the following deadlines: 
Fall semester, May 15; Spring semester, October 
15; Summer semester (all sessions), February 15. 
Departments may have earlier application dead- 
lines which take precedence over those established 
by the Graduate School. Applicants should consult 
the departments for their specific deadlines. 

Application for Readmission 

A student who has been out of school three or 
more semesters, including the summer semester, 
and wishes to return for the same admission 
classification and major must submit an applica- 
tion for readmission to the Office of Graduate 
Admissions. Note: A students who has not en- 
rolled during the previous six years must submit 
an application for admission. 

A student who has completed a graduate de- 
gree, and is applying for a second graduate de- 
gree, must submit an application for admission 
to the Office of Graduate Admissions. 

A student who is not currently enrolled and 
wishes to apply for a degree program different 
from that for which original!) admitted must 
submit an application tor admission to the Of- 
fice ol Graduate Admissions. 

A currently enrolled student applying tor a 

second graduate degree must submit an applica- 
tion for admission to the Office of Graduate Ail 

missions 

Applications lor admission or readmission 

must be submitted b\ the established deadlines. 



Graduate School General Information / 19 



Change of Degree Objective 

A student wishing to change his or her degree 
objective may do so with the approval of the de- 
partmental graduate coordinator and the dean of 
the Graduate School. A form requesting a 
change in degree objective may be submitted to 
the Graduate School if a student has registration 
eligibility and is 1) changing from provisional 
admission status to the status of a prospective 
candidate for a degree within the same depart- 
ment; 2) changing from one degree objective to 
another degree objective within the same depart- 
ment; and/or 3) changing from one major to an- 
other within the same department. 

A nondegree student or a transient student is 
not eligible to request a change of degree objec- 
tive and must apply for admission to be consid- 
ered for a graduate degree program. A currently 
enrolled student wishing to change from one de- 
gree and department/college to another degree 
and department/college must apply for admis- 
sion to the new department/college. 

Classification of Graduate 
Students 

At the discretion of individual schools or depart- 
ments and with the approval of the dean of the 
Graduate School, applicants may be considered for 
admission to one of the following classifications: 

1. Prospective candidate for a degree. Appli- 
cants who meet all requirements for admission 
to a degree program may apply as prospective 
candidates for a graduate degree. Applicants 
must submit the following to the Office of Grad- 
uate Admissions: the general application for ad- 
mission, a $30 application-processing fee, two 
official copies of transcripts from each institu- 
tion attended, except the University of Georgia, 
and two copies of official entrance test scores. If 
English is not the native language of the appli- 
cation, official TOEFL scores must also be sub- 
mitted. Applicants also must submit three letters 
of recommendation directly to the department to 
which they are applying, as well as any supple- 
mental information required by the department. 
Applicants are responsible for contacting the de- 
partmental graduate coordinator for information 
regarding any special requirements and any sup- 
plemental material which may be needed. 

Applicants upon whom some condition has 
been placed by the major department and/or the 
Graduate School may be admitted provisionally 
to a degree program if recommended by the de- 
partment and approved by the graduate dean. 



Applicants for the Specialist in Education de- 
gree are not eligible for provisional admission. 

2. Nondegree (ND). Applicants who do not in- 
tend to pursue a degree but who wish to take 
courses for professional advancement, licensure, 
or certification purposes, and who hold a bac- 
calaureate degree or higher degree from a re- 
gionally accredited institution, should apply for 
nondegree status. Applicants must submit the 
following to the Office of Graduate Admissions: 
the general application for admission, a $30 ap- 
plication-processing fee, two official copies of 
transcripts from the institution which awarded 
the highest degree, and a statement of purpose. 
If English is not the native language of the ap- 
plication, official TOEFL scores must also be 
submitted. Applicants are responsible for con- 
tacting the departmental graduate coordinator 
for information regarding any special require- 
ments or supplemental material which may be 
needed. 

Nondegree students who are later admitted as 
prospective degree candidates may apply a max- 
imum of nine hours of course work taken in non- 
degree status toward a graduate degree program. 
The inclusion of such course work on a program 
of study is subject to the approval of the major 
professor, the departmental graduate coordina- 
tor, and the dean of the Graduate School. 
Courses taken in the nondegree status may not 
be included on a program of study for the Spe- 
cialist in Education degree. 

3. Graduate Transient (TRANS). Transient ad- 
mission may be granted to students in good 
standing at regionally accredited graduate 
schools who wish to enroll for one semester at 
the University of Georgia. Applicants requesting 
this status must submit the following to the 
Office of Graduate Admissions: the general ap- 
plication for admission, a $30 application-pro- 
cessing fee, and certification of graduate 
standing in a regionally accredited institution. 
Additional information may be required by de- 
partments for admission to this classification; 
therefore, applicants should contact the appro- 
priate department. Students admitted in this 
classification who later wish to enroll as 
prospective candidates for a degree must make 
formal application to the Graduate School as de- 
scribed in item 1 above. 

Admission and Registration of 
Persons 62 Years of Age or Older 

According to the provisions of an amendment to 
the Constitution of the State of Georgia, senior 



20 / The Uni\crsii\ i>t Georgia 



citizens who are residents of Georgia now have 
access to institutional services available through 
University System units at reduced cost. The 
rules adopted by the Board of Regents regarding 
admission and registration of persons 62 years 
of age or older in units of the University System 
are listed below: 

1. Current or prospective students must be 
residents of Georgia, 62 years of age or older at 
the time of registration, and must present a birth 
certificate or other comparable written docu- 
mentation of age to enable the registrar to deter- 
mine eligibility. 

2. Persons who have been accepted through 
regular admission procedures may enroll as reg- 
ular students in courses offered for resident 
credit on a space available basis without pay- 
ment of fees, other than supply, laboratory, shop, 
and transportation charges. 

3. Prospective students must meet all system 
and institutional admission requirements to in- 
clude official transcripts of all high school 
and/or college credit; entrance test scores, i.e., 
SAT, GRE, GMAT, etc.; letters of recommenda- 
tion, and/or other materials as may be required. 

4. Students will be provided access to all ser- 
vices available at any particular system unit 
which are applicable to the creation and mainte- 
nance of student and institutional records. 

5. All degree-seeking students must meet all 
system, institutional, and legislated degree re- 
quirements such as the Regents' Test, major area 
examinations, preliminary and final oral and/or 
written examinations, and acceptable theses or 
dissertations. 

6. Students may not enroll in dental, medical, 
veterinary, or law schools under the provisions 
of this policy. 

The aforementioned rules became effective 
Fall 1977. 



Registration 



A graduate student using University facilities 
and/or staff time must register for a minimum of 
three hours of credit each semester. A student 
who holds an assistantship must register for a 
minimum of nine hours of credit each semester. 
Complete registration instructions are in- 
cluded in the University of Georgia Schedule of 
Classes for each semester. The Schedule of 
Classes is available in the Office of the Regis- 
trar, departmental offices, and deans' offices the 
first week of the semester preceding the semes- 
ter the student plans to register. 



Course Load 

A full-time course load is nine hours per semes- 
ter during the academic year and six hours dur- 
ing the summer semester. The minimum/ 
maximum course load for which a graduate stu- 
dent may enroll is governed by the following: 

Course Load 
(Sem. Hrs.) 





Minimum 


Maximum 


Students who do not have 






an assistantship 


3 


15 


Graduate Assistants: 






One-fourth (.25) time 


9 


12 


One-third (.33) time 


9 


12 


Four-ninths (.44) time 


9 


12 


One-half (.50) time 


9 


12 



To exceed the maximum course load, a stu- 
dent must obtain approval from his/her major 
professor and the dean of the Graduate School. 
The department head or the departmental gradu- 
ate coordinator may sign the overload request in 
the absence of the student's major professor. 

Generally, a request to exceed the maximum 
course load will not be approved unless the student 
satisfies the following guidelines: (1) is a prospec- 
tive candidate (or candidate) for a graduate degree, 
(2) has a cumulative graduate average of 3.5 or 
higher, (3) has no incompletes on his/her graduate 
record, and (4) is not a first- semester student. 

The maximum course load for an eight-week 
summer session is 12 hours. Permission to ex- 
ceed the maximum course load is not granted 
during the summer session. 

Course Numbers 

Courses numbered 8000-9999, taught by mem- 
bers of the graduate faculty, are advanced grad- 
uate courses and seminars which provide 
educational experiences at the highest level in a 
graduate student's program of study. Courses 
numbered 6000-6999 are fundamental knowl- 
edge courses; those numbered 7000-7999, ex- 
cept master's research (7000) and thesis (7300), 
are technique and professional courses Courses 
numbered 6000-7999 are normally taken earl) 
in the graduate student's program of Study. Joint 
undergraduate/graduate courses, numbered 
4000-4999/6000- 6999 and S000-S999/ 7000- 
7999, in which undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents are simultaneously enrolled are not 
normally used to provide the core requirements 
of a graduate degree program. Such courses ma\ 
be used as elect ives and as sen ice courses taken 
in other departments. 



CniJualf St hOOi General Information /21 



Enrollment in Graduate 
Courses — Law/Undergraduate 
Students 

Students enrolled in the School of Law, who 
hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited uni- 
versity/college and who are in good standing, 
may enroll in graduate courses with approval of 
their advisor and the dean of the Graduate 
School. An approval form may be obtained in 
the School of Law. 

Undergraduate students in good standing who 
are participating in the Honors Program may 
register for graduate courses with approval of 
their advisor and the dean of the Graduate 
School. An approval form may be obtained in 
the Honors Program Office. 

Undergraduate students, having received prior 
approval, may enroll for up to six semester hours 
of credit to be included in a graduate program of 
study if they are within three hours of completing 
requirements for the undergraduate degree. They 
may enroll for three hours of such credit if they are 
within six hours of completing degree require- 
ments. This credit must be in courses numbered 
4000-5999 which also have 6000-7999 listings. If 
work in the 4000-5999 numbered courses is satis- 
factory, credit at the graduate level will be granted 
after admission and registration in the Graduate 
School of the University of Georgia. A form to re- 
quest prior approval may be obtained in the Grad- 
uate School. 

Irregular Students 

A student registered in the University as an irreg- 
ular student cannot register for graduate courses. 
Course work taken in this classification cannot be 
counted for credit toward any graduate degree. 

Grade Reporting System 



The 

lows 


grad 

A 
B 
C 
D 
F 


e scale for graduate 

Excellent 

Good 

Satisfactory 

Passing 

Failure 


students is 


as 


fol- 



WF This designation indicates that the student 
was permitted to withdraw from a course 
while doing unsatisfactory work or with- 
drew after the midpoint of the grading 
period. The dropping of a course under 
these circumstances is equivalent to a 
failure. The symbol W will be assigned 
for withdrawals after the midpoint of a 



grading period in cases of a hardship. A 
determination that a hardship exists must 
be made by the Office of the Vice Presi- 
dent for Student Affairs and communi- 
cated to the Graduate School. 

S This symbol indicates that credit has been 
given for completion of degree require- 
ments other than academic course work. 
The grade of's must be assigned in thesis 
and dissertation courses (7300, 9300), 
where student performance or progress is 
satisfactory. The use of this symbol is ap- 
proved for seminars, applied projects, 
problems, internships, practicums, and re- 
search courses. Credit earned with an's 
grade will become part of cumulative hours 
earned, but the grade will not be included 
in the calculation of academic averages. 

U This symbol indicates unsatisfactory per- 
formance or progress in an attempt to 
complete degree requirements other than 
academic course work. The grade of U 
must be assigned in thesis and disserta- 
tion courses (7300, 9300), where student 
performance or progress is unsatisfactory. 
The use of this symbol has been approved 
for seminars, applied projects, problems, 
internships, practicums, and research 
courses. No credit is earned by a U grade. 
The grade is not included in the calcula- 
tion of academic averages. 

Once earned and recorded, a U grade can- 
not be changed to another grade. The 
grade of U is not acceptable as a terminal 
grade for thesis, problem, and dissertation 
courses. 

A/S This symbol indicates that both A-F and 
S/U grading systems are permitted in a 
course. Such courses are identified in 
their course description and are limited in 
number. The instructor should explain the 
conditions for the use of both grading sys- 
tems at the beginning of the course. 

If a student does not receive a grade in a 
course for which he/she enrolled, one of the fol- 
lowing designations must be placed on the stu- 
dent's record: 

I This letter indicates that a student was 

doing satisfactory work, but for nonacad- 
emic reasons beyond his/her control, was 
unable to meet full requirements of the 
course. When an incomplete is not re- 
moved within two terms (including sum- 
mer), the I automatically becomes an F. 



22 / The University of Georgia 



W This designation indicates that the student 
was permitted to withdraw from a course 
without penalty. Withdrawals without 
penalty will not be permitted after the mid- 
point of the total grading period except in 
cases of hardship. A determination that a 
hardship exists must be made by the Office 
of the Vice President for Student Affairs 
and communicated to the Graduate School. 

V This designation indicates an audit. No 
credit is given for an audit. Students may 
not transfer from audit to credit status or 
vice versa after the closing of the 
drop/add period of each semester. 

ER This symbol indicates an error in report- 
ing. If not removed after one semester, the 
ER becomes a grade of WF. Upon receiv- 
ing a grade of ER, the student should con- 
sult with the course instructor. 

All grade appeals must be initiated within one 
calendar year from the end of the term in which 
the grade was recorded. 

For purposes of computing semester, yearly, 
and cumulative grade point averages, letter 
grades must be converted into numerical equiv- 
alents. The equivalents are: 
A 4.0 WF 

B 3.0 I * 

C 2.0 S * 

D 1.0 U * 

F V * 



*Not computed 



Special Instructional 
Programs 

Combined Degree Programs 

The Graduate School offers certain combined 
degrees with other schools and colleges in the 
University. 

Selected students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences may be eligible for completion of com- 
bined AB and MA or BS and MS programs in a 
four-year period. Students in the College may 
also be allowed to complete AB and MBA or BS 
and MBA programs in five years. Students in- 
terested in these degree objectives should con- 
tact the University Honors Program. 

Certain students in the College of Family and 
Consumer Sciences may be eligible to pursue 
the combined degrees of BSHE and MBA; in the 



College of Journalism and Mass Communica- 
tion students may be allowed to pursue com- 
bined programs leading to the ABJ and MBA 
degrees; and in the Terry College of Business 
students may be eligible to pursue combined 
programs leading to the BBA and MAcc de- 
grees. All of these combined degree programs 
are designed to be completed in five years. 

Students interested in the JD and MBA or JD 
and MAcc four-year combined degree programs 
should contact the School of Law and the Terry 
College of Business. 

Selected pharmacy students may enter a com- 
bined degree program in which they receive the 
BS degree in pharmacy at the end of their third 
professional year and the MS degree in phar- 
macy at the end of one additional year. 

Study Abroad/Exchange Programs 

The various schools/colleges and departments of 
the University sponsor a number of study abroad 
programs. These include study in such countries 
as Belgium (international law), Italy (art, classics, 
Romance languages, journalism, and drama), 
England (international business and British his- 
tory, politics, literature, and culture), Brazil (Ro- 
mance languages), and France (international 
business). Other opportunities for study overseas 
are available through the University System of 
Georgia institutions, through programs offered by 
other educational institutions, and through UGA 
exchange programs in Argentina, France, En- 
gland, the Netherlands, and Germany. 

A student should receive verification in writing 
from the major professor, graduate coordinator, 
and dean of the Graduate School that credit earned 
through a study abroad or exchange program may 
be applied to the program of study for the gradu- 
ate degree. Students should also complete a Study 
Abroad Credit Approval Form, especially if they 
wish to apply student financial aid funds toward 
study abroad. This form may be obtained from the 
Office of International Education. 

If the study abroad or exchange program of- 
fers courses through UGA inserv ice/off-campus 
credit or through the REGT Studies Abroad Cur- 
riculum, the credit earned will be recorded as 
resident credit, otherwise the credit earned will 
be recorded as transfer credit. Students arc ld- 
vised to contact the Graduate School about poli- 
cies related to transfer credit. 

To explore the many programs tor studs. 
work, research, travel, internships, teaching, 
and/or volunteering overseas, contact the Office 
o\' International Education, The University o\ 



Graduate School General Information /23 



Georgia, 201 Barrow Hall, Athens, Georgia 
30602-2407, (706) 542-7903. 

Cortona Program 

The University of Georgia sponsors an interdis- 
ciplinary study abroad program year-round (fall, 
spring, summer) located in Cortona (Tuscany), 
Italy. The areas of study are art history, studio 
arts (book arts, ceramics, design, drawing, inte- 
rior design, jewelry and metalsmithing, painting, 
papermaking, photography, printmaking, sculp- 
ture, and watercolor), landscape architecture, 
Italian, Italian culture, and classics. Extensive 
travel to major sites (Rome, Pompeii, Siena, 
Urbino, Florence, Venice, etc.) are part of the 
itinerary. The program offers courses for under- 
graduate and graduate credit. 

For more information concerning this pro- 
gram, contact Studies Abroad Cortona Program, 
School of Art, Bishop House, Room #1, (706) 
542-7011. 

Volcani Program for Graduate 
Students from the College of 
Agricultural and Environmental 
Sciences 

A 1987 agreement between the University of 
Georgia and the Israeli Agricultural Research 
Organization, Volcani Center, provides for coop- 
erative educational and research activities in the 
agricultural sciences and related topics. Gradu- 
ate studies are available to University of Georgia 
students interested in conducting research in arid 
and semi-arid zones, leading to an advanced de- 
gree; to Israeli graduate students and to candi- 
dates from developing countries interested in 
international training, experience in Israel and a 
graduate degree from the University. 

Cooperative Education 

Cooperative Education (Co-op) is a structured 
educational plan alternating periods of work 
with periods of academic study. Cooperative Ed- 
ucation helps students to relate career and aca- 
demic goals and to develop skills systematically 
in both areas. Employment is salaried, related to 
the field of study, regular, continuing, increasing 
in difficulty and responsibility, and usually par- 
alleling the academic curriculum. 

University of Georgia cooperative education 
takes place in a variety of business, industrial, 
and federal government settings in many states 
throughout the country. Opportunities are avail- 



24 / The University "I Georgia 



able to graduate students at the master's level in 
a variety of academic fields. For information, 
write the Career Planning and Placement Center, 
Clark Howell Hall, or call (706) 542-3375. 

Academic Regulations and 
Procedures 

Statements set forth in this bulletin are for infor- 
mational purposes only and should not be con- 
strued as the basis of a contract between a 
student and the institution. While every effort is 
made to provide accurate and current informa- 
tion, the University reserves the right to change, 
without notice, statements in the bulletin con- 
cerning rules, policies, fees, curricula, courses, 
calendar, or other matters. Students enrolled at 
the University agree to comply with the Univer- 
sity's rules and regulations and to accommodate 
to any changes necessary. 

Students have the responsibility for keeping 
themselves apprised of current graduation re- 
quirements for their particular degree program. 

Use of Credit 

Course and resident credit used to satisfy the re- 
quirements of one degree cannot be used to sat- 
isfy the requirements of another degree. 

Cumulative Graduate Average 

To be eligible for admission to candidacy and 
graduation, a student must maintain an average 
of 3.0 (B) on all graduate courses taken and on 
all courses on the program of study. No grade 
below C (2.0) will be accepted as part of a pro- 
gram of study for a graduate degree. 

When a graduate course is repeated, the last 
grade received will be used in calculating the cu- 
mulative graduate average that is used for pro- 
bation, dismissal, admission to candidacy, and 
graduation. Grades received in all graduate 
courses will be included in the graduate cumula- 
tive average. 

Extension and Correspondence 

Graduate credit is not allowed for work done in 
extension or by correspondence. 

Resident Credit in Graduate 
Centers 

I. For course work leading to a professional mas- 
ter's degree, credit on a resident basis will be 
granted for graduate courses taken at a graduate 



center approved by the Board of Regents, pro- 
vided: 

1 . the student has been admitted to the Grad- 
uate School of the University of Georgia 
prior to taking the course; 

2. the physical facilities such as classrooms, 
library, and teaching aids are adequate as 
determined by a site visit of at least three 
persons, one appointed by the dean of the 
school or college offering the course, one 
appointed by the Director of Libraries, and 
one appointed by the dean of the Graduate 
School; and 

3. the instructor is the same one who teaches 
the course on campus, or is approved by the 
dean of the school or college offering the 
course and the dean of the Graduate School. 

II. Resident credit will be granted for course 
work or research leading to degrees other than 
professional master's degrees offered at off- 
campus locations provided: 

1 . the student has been admitted to the Grad- 
uate School prior to taking the course; 

2. the requirement of two consecutive semes- 
ters of full-time work on campus in Athens 
for all doctoral students is satisfied; 

3. the requirement of two semesters of full- 
time work on campus in Athens (which need 
not be consecutive) is, in general, satisfied 
for all candidates for MA and MS degrees. 
An exception to the above may be made for 
students who prefer to spend one semester 
of full-time work abroad in a program of 
study approved by the University of Georgia 
or the Board of Regents. Such study shall be 
counted as resident credit; and 

4. the instructor is the same one who teaches 
the course or directs the research on cam- 
pus, or is approved by the dean of the 
school or college offering the work and the 
dean of the Graduate School. 

III. Residence or nonresidence credit for Studies 
Abroad is determined by the department from 
which a student is seeking a degree. 

Application for Graduation 

An application for graduation must be filed with 
the Graduate School no later than Friday of the 
second full week of classes two semesters prior to 
the anticipated graduation date. Application forms 
may be obtained from the Graduate School. 

Final Registration Requirement 

Students must be registered at the University <>f 
Georgia for a minimum of three hours of credit 



the semester in which they complete all degree 
requirements. Once degree requirements have 
been completed, no further registration is re- 
quired, even if the official graduation date is in a 
following semester. 

A graduate course, GRSC 9270 (Graduate 
Study Completion), is designed for students 
completing degree requirements who will be 
using staff time or University facilities and for 
whom no regular course is appropriate. Permis- 
sion to register for this course must be granted 
by the Graduate School. 

Students will not be approved for graduation 
if they have a grade of I or ER which, when 
changed to a recorded grade, could cause the 
graduate grade point average to fall below the 
minimum required for graduation. 

Graduation Exercises 

Formal commencement exercises are held in May 
and December. Students who graduated in August 
may participate in the December commencement 
exercises if they wish to do so. Candidates for de- 
grees are urged to participate in graduation exer- 
cises, but they are not required to attend. 

Awarding Doctoral Degrees — 
University Faculty 

No member of the faculty of the University of 
Georgia above the rank of instructor will be 
awarded a doctoral degree by the University. 

Probation and Dismissal 

Students may be dismissed by their department at 
the end of any semester if they have not made suf- 
ficient academic progress to warrant continuance 
of study. Termination of students will follow poli- 
cies and procedures adopted by the department 
and reported to the Graduate School. Dismissal by 
an academic department may be appealed to the 
dean of the Graduate School after all avenues ot 
appeal have been exhausted at the departmental 
level. When students are terminated by a depart- 
ment, but not simultaneous!) by the Graduate 
School, they may apply for admission to another 
graduate program if they wish to do so. 

Students with a cumulative graduate course 
average below 3.0 tor two consecutive terms are 
placed on academic probation bv the Graduate 
School. They then must make a 3.0 or higher se- 
mester graduate average each succeeding semes- 
ter that their overall cumulative graduate 
average is below 3.0. These students are no 
longeron probation when their cumulative grad- 



Groduau School General Information /25 



uate average is 3.0 or above. If they make below 
a 3.0 semester graduate average while on proba- 
tion, they are dismissed. When students repeat a 
graduate course, the last grade will be utilized to 
calculate the cumulative graduate average that is 
used for probation, dismissal, admission to can- 
didacy and graduation. Grades of S, U, I, and V 
will not be used in calculating the cumulative 
graduate average. When students are dismissed 
under the terms of this policy, they may not 
apply for admission to another graduate program 
offered by the University. 

Students who are dismissed by the Graduate 
School for academic reasons may appeal the dis- 
missal to the dean of the Graduate School. The 
appeal must be submitted to the dean within 30 
calendar days following receipt of notice of dis- 
missal. Information concerning the appeal 
process may be obtained in the Graduate School. 

Appeals 

University of Georgia students have the right to 
appeal academic decisions. Usually the appeal 
goes first to the unit responsible for the decision 
(for example, grades or departmental require- 
ments to the department; college or school 
requirements to the school; university require- 
ments to the Educational Affairs Committee). An 
unfavorable ruling at one level can be appealed to 
the successive levels (viz. a department ruling can 
be appealed to the college in which the institu- 
tional unit is located; a college-level ruling can be 
appealed to the University Council Educational 
Affairs Committee; the Educational Affairs Com- 
mittee ruling can be appealed to the President of 
the University; and the President's ruling can be 
appealed to the Board of Regents). Additional de- 
tails on appeals of academic matters can be ob- 
tained from the Office of Academic Affairs, 110 
Old College, telephone (706) 542-8947. Policies 
regarding appeals in the Graduate School may be 
obtained from the Office of the Dean, Room 516, 
Boyd Graduate Studies Research Center, or by 
phoning (706) 542-4795. 

Student Education Records 

The federal Family Educational Rights and Pri- 
vacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights 
with respect to their education records. They in- 
clude the following: 

(1) The right to inspect and review the stu- 
dent's education records, subject to certain spe- 
cific exceptions. A student wishing to review 
his/her education records should submit to the 
registrar, academic dean or other appropriate of- 



ficial a written request that identifies the records 
he/she wishes to inspect. The University official 
will make arrangements for access and notify 
the student of the time and place where the 
records may be inspected. If the records are not 
maintained by the University official to whom 
the request was submitted, that official will ad- 
vise the student of the correct official to whom 
the request should be addressed. 

(2) The right to request the amendment of the 
student's education records. A student may ask the 
University to amend a record that he/she believes 
is inaccurate or misleading. The student should 
write the University official responsible for the 
record, clearly identifying the part of the record 
he/she wants changed and specifying how it is in- 
accurate or misleading. If the University decides 
not to amend the record as requested by the stu- 
dent, the University will notify the student of the 
decision and advise the student of his/her right to 
a hearing as well as the hearing procedures. 

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of per- 
sonally identifiable information contained in the 
student's education records, except to the extent 
that FERPA authorizes disclosure without the 
student's consent. One exception is disclosure to 
other University officials who have been deter- 
mined to have a legitimate educational interest 
in the information. 

Upon request, the University also discloses 
education records without the student's consent 
to officials of another school in which a student 
seeks or intends to enroll. In addition, directory 
information may be disclosed without a stu- 
dent's consent unless the student has advised the 
registrar in writing and he/she wishes to restrict 
access to this information. Directory informa- 
tion includes, but is not limited to, the student's 
name, address, telephone listing, e-mail address, 
date and place of birth, major field of study, par- 
ticipation in officially recognized activities and 
sports, dates of attendance, degrees and awards 
received and the most recent previous educa- 
tional agency or institution attended by the stu- 
dent, as well as the weight and height of 
members of athletic teams. 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. 
Department of Education concerning the Univer- 
sity's alleged failure to comply with FERPA. The 
name and address of the office that administers 
FERPA is Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. 
Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, 
S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-4605. 

Copies of the complete University policy 
statement regarding FERPA may be obtained 
from the Office of the Registrar. 



26 / The University of Georgia 



Academic Honesty 

Academic integrity is an adherence to a high stan- 
dard of values regarding life and work in an aca- 
demic community. Pursuit of knowledge and the 
creation of an atmosphere conducive to learning 
are both definite aspects of academic integrity, but 
its basis lies in the standard of honesty. 

Students at the University of Georgia are re- 
sponsible for maintaining and adhering to the 
strictest standards of honesty and integrity in 
every aspect of their lives. Honesty in academic 
matters is a large part of this obligation. Specific 
regulations governing student academic conduct 
are contained in the Student Handbook, and these 
should be read to avoid any misunderstanding. 

Students and faculty who suspect that an act 
of academic dishonesty has taken place should 
contact the Office of the Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs. 

Research with Human 
Participants 

As a matter of University policy, research pro- 
jects involving human participants must not be 
carried out until an application describing the 
project has been submitted and approved by the 
Institutional Review Board in the Office of the 
Vice President for Research. This policy applies 
to all research, regardless of whether internal, 
external, or no funding is involved. Failure to 
obtain this approval for research is a violation of 
University policy and federal regulations. 
Human participation is considered to be in- 
volved any time data are collected on individu- 
als even if there is no contact with the 
participants. The policy extends to all projects 
involving faculty, staff, students, or facilities of 
the University, including research performed by 
students as part of their degree or class require- 
ments. The major professor is responsible for 
seeing that student projects are approved. Ap- 
proval is necessary for any type of research in 
any area of study. Some, but not all, examples 
include marketing research, behavioral or psy- 
chological studies, research involving children 
in classrooms, and on-the-street interviews. 

The detailed guidelines of this policy and the 
application forms necessary to obtain approval of 
a research protocol are available on the world- 
wide-web at http://www.ovpr.uga.edu/hso/. Ques- 
tions concerning these guidelines may be directed 
to that office at (706) 542-3 1 99. Projects involving 
no risk to subjects can usually be approved expe- 
ditiously, but it is recommended that the forms be 



submitted well in advance of the date you would 
like to begin the research and, if applicable, prior 
to submitting a proposal for external funding. 

Student Services 
Housing 

The Family and Graduate Housing Complex at 
the University of Georgia offers 579 one- and 
two-bedroom furnished and unfurnished apart- 
ments to married students, students with chil- 
dren, and single graduate and professional 
students. Acceptance for enrollment to the Uni- 
versity does not ensure an assignment to Family 
and Graduate Housing, and the demand for 
Family and Graduate Housing often exceeds the 
number of available apartments. Interested per- 
sons are advised to submit an application and 
non- refundable application fee as early as pos- 
sible. Applicants will not be placed on the wait- 
ing list until their application and fees are 
received in the Family and Graduate Housing 
Office. Applications and information for Family 
and Graduate Housing may be obtained by writ- 
ing the Family Housing Office, University of 
Georgia, 710 East Campus Road, Athens, Geor- 
gia 30602-4622 or by calling (706) 542-1473. 

Additionally, there are 17 residence halls on 
campus which provide a variety of living options. 
While graduate and professional students are wel- 
come in these residence halls, it should be noted 
that the population of these buildings is over- 
whelmingly undergraduate and no single occu- 
pancy rooms are available for new residents. 
Although most residence halls operate according 
to the University's academic calendar, three resi- 
dence halls, Morris Hall, Payne Hall, and Reed 
Hall, operate on a 12-month calendar and provide 
continuous service during academic recesses, 
while McWhorter Hall is open continuously dur- 
ing the 9-month academic year. Sixteen of the res- 
idence halls are air-conditioned, and cable TV and 
local phone service are provided in e\ery room 

Applications for on-campus housing will be 
accepted after students have been admitted to 
the University. For additional information, write 
to the Department of University Housing. Rus- 
sell Hall, University ot Georgia, Athens. Geor- 
gia 30602-5575. or call (706) 542-1421. 

Food Services 

Universit) food Services operates four food ser- 
vice facilities tor general student use: Bolton Hall. 
Oglethorpe Hall. Snelling Hall, and the Talc Stu- 



Gradueue St hook General Information /27 



dent Center. With the exception of the Tate Student 
Center, which operates under a cash only policy, 
students may pay for each meal on a cash basis or 
may purchase meal plans on an academic year 
contract basis. Students who purchase the meal 
plan enjoy the privilege of unlimited access and 
unlimited servings as well as the choice of eating 
in any of the cafeterias. Students are also eligible 
to participate in special events offered by Food 
Services. In addition to the major facilities, Food 
Services provides various cash food outlets 
throughout the campus. For further information, 
write the Food Services Business Office, Snelling 
Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 
30602-3772, call (706) 542-1256, or visit the Food 
Services web site at www.uga.edu/~food-serv. 

Transportation 

The Campus Transit System, which is funded 
each semester by a transportation fee paid by all 
students, provides bus service on a no-fare basis. 
The buses run on a regular schedule to all parts 
of the campus and in adjacent residential areas. 
Furthermore, the City of Athens and the Univer- 
sity of Georgia have an arrangement that permits 
students to ride any Athens Transit System bus 
without charge upon presentation of University 
of Georgia identification card. The transporta- 
tion fee includes a parking permit. All students 
are allowed to register cars on campus. 

University Health Center 

Before their arrival on campus, students must 
complete and return to the University Health 
Center the University Health Center Report of 
Medical History which includes a record of their 
immunizations. Students may not register for 
classes without documentation for the immu- 
nization requirements for new students man- 
dated by the Board of Regents. 

The University Health Center offers a compre- 
hensive outpatient health care program to all stu- 
dents who are registered in classes. The Health 
Center, with its 14 full-time physicians and a com- 
plete clinical staff, has regular medical clinics as 
well as special clinics in acute care, women's 
health, dentistry, sports medicine, physical ther- 
apy, and allergy and travel medicine. Additionally, 
the Department of Health Promotion offers stu- 
dents preventive health and counseling programs 
in areas that include: alcohol, tobacco and other 
substances, campus safety, nutrition, sexual 
health, and stress management. The department 
also offers an anonymous HIV counseling and 
testing program. The Mental Health Clinic offers 

28 / The University of Georgia 



individual, couples, and group therapy, a compre- 
hensive eating disorders program, a relaxation 
therapy training room, and consultation, evalua- 
tion, and testing services. Supplemental health in- 
surance is available to help cover costs of medical 
emergencies away from campus or beyond the 
scope of care available at the Health Center. For 
more information, write the University Health 
Center, The University of Georgia, Athens, Geor- 
gia 30602-1755, or call (706) 542-1162 or access 
our web site at www.uhs.uga.edu. 

Career Services Center 

The Career Services Center in Clark Howell Hall 
assists students in exploring career opportunities 
and in formulating a job search campaign. It offers 
a comprehensive career advising placement ser- 
vice, including campus interviews with prospec- 
tive employers, job vacancy listings and referrals, 
credentials files, and continuing career counseling 
for students and alumni. In conjunction with these 
efforts, schools and departments have their own 
services which put students in touch with prospec- 
tive employers in specific fields of study. 

Students may contact the Student Employment 
Service in Clark Howell Hall for help in finding 
part-time work on campus, employment in the 
Athens community, and summer or vacation 
work. Assistance from this office is also available 
in finding full-time employment for students' 
spouses. For information, call (706) 542-3375. 

Non-academic employment at the University 
is handled through the Employment and Em- 
ployee Relations Department, Human Resources 
Building, S. Jackson Street, The University of 
Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-4135. For in- 
formation, call (706) 542-2623. 

Disability Services 

The mission of Disability Services (DS) is to 
create an accessible academic, social, and phys- 
ical environment for students with disabilities at 
the University of Georgia. DS seeks to eliminate 
attitudinal barriers that exist on campus and 
serves as an advocate for students with disabili- 
ties. DS also encourages students to develop 
independence and responsibility as they partici- 
pate in university life. 

DS provides services to students who have ei- 
ther a physical or mental impairment which sub- 
stantially limits one or more major life activities, 
ie. ADD/ADHD, cerebral palsy, hearing impair- 
ments, psychological disorders, quadriplegia, 
acquired brain injuries, cardiac disease, deafness 
and blindness. To qualify for services, student 



must have a verifiable disability by providing 
current documentation from a qualified health 
professional. 

DS provides a variety of academic and sup- 
port services to ensure equal access to Univer- 
sity programs and activities. DS also provides 
assistive devices and state-of-the-art adaptive 
computer equipment specifically designed for 
people with disabilities. 

Centrally located on the first floor of Clark 
Howell Hall, DS is open M-F from 8 am to 5 pm. 
For more information, call (706) 542-8719 or visit 
our web site at: http://www.dissvcs.uga.edu/. 

Campus Security 

Each year the University of Georgia publishes a 
campus security report. This report contains in- 
formation on campus safety programs as well as 
advice on crime prevention and the procedures 
to follow in reporting crimes. The report also 
contains statistics about crimes on campus dur- 
ing the last three calendar years. This report is 
available upon request from the Office of Grad- 
uate Admissions, The University of Georgia, 
Athens, Georgia 30602-7402, (706) 542-1787. 

Financial Information 
Expenses 

The University of Georgia converted from the 
quarter system to the semester system beginning 
Fall 1998. Matriculation fees for the semester 
system will be determined in April of each year, 
after the printing of this bulletin. For semester 
fee information, visit the Graduate School web 
site at http://www.gradsch.uga.edu or call the 
Banking and Trust Department, (706) 542-1625. 
The web site will be updated with semester in- 
formation as it becomes available. 

The current (1999-00) estimate cost of educa- 
tion for a Georgia resident is $12,840 per aca- 
demic year. This estimate includes tuition and 
fees, books and supplies, room and board, insur- 
ance, and personal expenses. An additional out- 
of-state fee assessed of all non-Georgia residents 
increases this estimate to $21,528. These esti- 
mates to not include travel. 

Students who hold a graduate assistantship 
pay a matriculation fee of $55 per academic year 
of two semesters, payable $25 at the beginning 
of each semester. This figure is based on the 
minimum registration for a graduate assistant of 
nine hours each semester. Nonresident fees are 
waived for these graduate assistants. Students 



holding graduate assistantships must also pay 
the activity, athletic, transportation, and health 
fees. The doctoral candidate must pay a $55 mi- 
crofilm fee. Those students pursuing degrees re- 
quiring a thesis or dissertation must also pay a 
binding fee (or archiving fee) of at least $19.95 
for the three copies retained by the university. 

Agencies sponsoring regularly enrolled stu- 
dents who receive special academic programming 
or administrative services are expected to pay fees 
in addition to those normally charged for the usual 
administrative services. While rates charged will 
be determined by contract arrangements, the 
scheduled fees for such services will be $125 per 
semester, payable in U.S. dollars only. 

All fees at the University are subject to change 
at any time as approved by the Board of Regents. 

Fee Refunds/Repayments 

Please be aware that the current policy on fee re- 
funds is only valid until August 1 , 2000. New poli- 
cies regarding fee refunds will be implemented 
beginning 2000 Fall semester according to 
changes required by the Higher Education 
Amendments of 1998 (HEA 1998). Information 
regarding the new policy is not available at this 
time. Please visit the website http://www.bul- 
letin.uga.edu/ for further information and updates 
on the new policy. In order to receive a refund of 
fees due to withdrawal from school, students must 
contact the Office of the Vice President for Stu- 
dents Affairs and formally withdraw. (Note: With- 
drawal from school cannot be accomplished 
through drop/add after the first day of class). Stu- 
dents who formally withdraw from the University 
on or before the first day of class are entitled to a 
refund of 100 percent of fees paid for that term; 
withdrawal after the first day of class but before 
the end of the first 10 percent (in time) of the pe- 
riod of enrollment, 90 percent; withdrawal after 
the first 10 percent (in time) of the period of en- 
rollment but before the end of the first 25 percent 
(in time) of the period of enrollment, 50 percent; 
withdrawal after the first 25 percent (in time) of 
the period of enrollment but before the end of the 
first 50 percent (in time) of the period of enroll- 
ment, 25 percent. Refunds will be made at the end 
of the term. No refunds for reduction in hours alter 
the drop/add period are allowed unless such re- 
duction is the fault of the University 

The following arc not entitled to an) refund ot 
fees paid: students who withdraw after the first 
50 percent (in time) of the period of enrollment, 
students suspended tor disciplinary reasons, stu- 
dents who leave the University when discipli- 



(innluutt St hii<>l General Information /29 



nary action is pending, or students who do not 
formally withdraw. 

Students attending the University for the first 
time who receive assistance under Title IV of the 
Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended are en- 
titled to a pro-rata refund of that portion of the tu- 
ition, fees, room and board, and other charges 
assessed the student by the institution equal to that 
portion of the period of enrollment for which the 
student has been charged that remains on the last 
day of attendance by the student up to the sixty 
percent point in time in the period of enrollment. 
In the event a student receives Title IV aid and 
fails to complete registration and/or fee payment 
for the academic term for which financial assis- 
tance was awarded, the full amount of the Title IV 
aid received must be repaid immediately. In the 
event a student receives Title IV aid, completes 
registration, and subsequently reduces his/her en- 
rollment status or withdraws, the amount of funds 
to be returned to the Title IV programs will be in 
accordance with federal regulations concerning 
refunds and repayments to the Title IV programs. 

All refunds, up to the amount of the aid re- 
ceived for the term, will be returned to the Title 
IV programs according to the following priority: 

1 . Federal Family Educational Loans 

2. Federal Direct Student Loans 

3. Federal Perkins Loans 

4. Other federal sources of aid 

5. Other state, private, or institutional aid 

6. Student 

All repayments, up to the amount of the aid re- 
ceived for the term, will be returned to the Title IV 
programs according to the following priority: 

1 . Federal Perkins Loans 

2. Other federal sources of aid 

3. Other state, private, or institutional aid 

Academic Common Market 

The University of Georgia participates in the 
Academic Common Market, an agreement 
among states in the southern region for sharing 
unique academic programs. Residents of the 
participating states who qualify for full (uncon- 
ditional) admission to the specified graduate de- 
gree program and who are approved by their 
state coordinator may enroll at the University of 
Georgia on an in-state tuition basis. 

To qualify for waiver of the non-resident fee, 
a student must establish eligibility for participa- 
tion in the Academic Common Market by the 
midpoint of each semester. Eligibility is not 
retroactive to previous academic terms. 

For further information about the Academic 



30 / The University <>l Georgia 



Common Market, persons should contact the 
Graduate School (706) 542-4795, or the South- 
ern Regional Education Board, 1340 Spring 
Street, N.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30309. 

Classification of Students for 
Tuition Purposes 

With respect to resident/nonresident student clas- 
sification, University System policies provide: 

1. (a) If a person is 18 years or age or older, 
he or she may register as an in-state stu- 
dent only upon a showing that he or she 
had been a legal resident of Georgia for a 
period of at least twelve months immedi- 
ately preceding the date of registration, 
(b) No emancipated minor or other person 
1 8 years of age or older shall be deemed to 
have gained or acquired in-state status for 
tuition purposes while attending any educa- 
tional institution in this State, in the absence 
of a clear demonstration that he or she has in 
fact established legal residence in this State. 

2. If a person is under 18 years of age, he or 
she may register as an in-state student only 
upon a showing that his or her supporting 
parent or guardian has been a legal resident 
of Georgia for a period of at least twelve 
months immediately preceding the date of 
registration. 

3. If a parent or legal guardian of a minor 
changes his or her legal residence to an- 
other state following a period of legal res- 
idence in Georgia, the minor may continue 
to take courses for a period of twelve con- 
secutive months on the payment of in-state 
tuition. After the expiration of the twelve- 
month period, the student may continue his 
or her registration only upon the payment 
of fees at the out-of-state rate. 

4. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia 
is appointed as guardian of a nonresident 
minor, such minor will not be permitted to 
register as an in-state student until the ex- 
piration of one year from the date of court 
appointment, and then only upon a proper 
showing that such appointment was not 
made to avoid payment of the out-of-state 
fees. 

5. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident 
students; provided, however, that an alien 
who is living in this country under an im- 
migration document permitting indefinite 
or permanent residence shall have the 
same privilege of qualifying for in-state tu- 
ition as a citizen of the United States. 



6. Waivers: Based upon the student's aca- 
demic performance (GRE and grade point 
average), an institution may waive out-of- 
state tuition for: 

(a) nonresident students who are finan- 
cially dependent upon a parent, parents, or 
spouse who has been a legal resident of 
Georgia for at least twelve consecutive 
months immediately preceding the date of 
registration; provided, however, that such 
financial dependence shall have existed for 
at least twelve consecutive months imme- 
diately preceding the date of registration; 

(b) international students, selected by the in- 
stitutional president or his authorized repre- 
sentative, provided that the number of such 
waivers in effect does not exceed one percent 
of the equivalent full-time students enrolled 
at the institution in the fall semester immedi- 
ately preceding the semester for which the 
out-of-state tuition is to be waived; 

(c) full-time employees of the University 
System, their spouses, and their dependent 
children; 

(d) medical and dental residents and med- 
ical and dental interns at the Medical Col- 
lege of Georgia; 

(e) full-time teachers in the public schools 
of Georgia or in the programs of the State 
Board of Technical and Adult Education 
and their dependent children. Teachers em- 
ployed full-time on military bases in Geor- 
gia shall also qualify for this waiver; 

(0 career consular officers and their de- 
pendents who are citizens of the foreign 
nation which their consular office repre- 
sents, and who are stationed and living in 
Georgia under orders of their respective 
governments. This waiver shall apply only 
to those consular officers whose nations 
operate on the principle of educational rec- 
iprocity with the United States; 
(g) military personnel and their dependents 
stationed in Georgia and on active duty un- 
less such military personnel are assigned 
as students to System institutions for edu- 
cational purposes; 

(h) selected graduate students at Univer- 
sity-level institutions; 
(i) students who are legal residents of out- 
of-state counties bordering on Georgia 
counties in which an institution of the Uni- 
versity System is located and who arc en- 
rolled in said institution. 

7. A student is responsible for registering under 
the proper residency classification. A student 



classified as a nonresident who believes that 
he/she is entitled to be classified as a legal 
resident may petition the Registrar for a 
change in status. The petition must be filed 
no later than sixty (60) days after the semes- 
ter begins in order for the student to be con- 
sidered for reclassification for that semester. 
If the petition is granted, reclassification will 
not be retroactive to prior semesters. The 
necessary forms for this purpose are avail- 
able in the Registrar's office. 
8. Questions concerning classification for 
fee-payment purposes should be directed 
to one of the following persons: 
Graduate applicants for admission: 

Director of Graduate Admissions 

534 Boyd Graduate Studies 

Research Center 
Currently enrolled students: 

Assistant Registrar 

105 Academic Building 

Financial Assistance and 
Awards 

More than 2,800 graduate students receive some 
form of financial assistance from the University. 
Persons holding an assistantship pay a reduced 
matriculation fee of only $25 and a modest ac- 
tivity fee (currently $310) each semester. Recip- 
ients of these awards must be fully admitted to 
the Graduate School in a degree-seeking status. 
For additional information and application pro- 
cedures, contact the graduate coordinator of the 
department. 

General University Awards 

Graduate School Assistantships 

The Graduate School each year selects univer- 
sity-wide graduate assistants from a list o\~ 
highly qualified students who are nominated by 
their major departments. Each nominee is evalu- 
ated by a faculty panel in early March. Selec- 
tions are based on the applicant's academic 
record, test scores, recommendations, and other 
pertinent information. 

Predoctoral Assistantships 

Predoctoral assistantships are awarded on a 

competitive basis to faculty members of Georgia 

colleges upon nomination by the president of the 
college in which the) are teaching. Hie stipend 
is approximately 112,600 per academic year. 
Recipients are expected to have no work obliga- 



Graduat* Sdwol General Information 31 



tion to their home institution and enroll for full- 
time graduate work. Nominations should be 
made to the Director of the Institute of Higher 
Education, The University of Georgia, by Febru- 
ary 1 5 of each year. 

Regents' Waivers of Out-of-State Tuition 

The Graduate School awards out-of-state tuition 
waivers to students who are classified as non-resi- 
dents of the State of Georgia. The awards are based 
upon applicants' academic records and the recom- 
mendations of their major departments. The 
waiver renews each semester contingent upon re- 
cipients earning at least a 3.50 graduate grade 
point average on twelve hours of graduate course 
work. These awards waive only the non-resident 
portion of a student's tuition. Students interested in 
being nominated for this award should contact the 
graduate coordinator in their major department. 

Regents' Opportunity Scholarships 

The Regents' Opportunity Scholarships were es- 
tablished by the Georgia General Assembly in 
1978 to assist certain economically disadvantaged 
students who have been accepted for admission as 
incoming graduate or professional students en- 
rolled in institutions of the University System. 
Students must be residents of the State of Georgia. 
The scholarships are awarded in the amount of 
$5,000 per year and are renewable. Students must 
maintain good academic standing and full-time 
status. Priority is given to renewals. Application 
must be made by April 1. Applicants should con- 
tact the dean of the appropriate academic col- 
lege/school for additional information. 

Departmental Assistantships and 
Awards 

A variety of fellowships, scholarships, and as- 
sistantships are awarded by the various depart- 
ments and divisions of the University. The 
amount of the award and the expected work re- 
quired vary from department to department. 
Deadlines for submitting applications for depart- 
mental assistantships also vary among depart- 
ments. Students holding graduate assistantships 
that require thirteen hours of work per week 
must register tor a minimum of nine hours of 
course work to be eligible for the reduced ma- 
triculation fee. For information concerning these 
awards contact the appropriate department. 

Teaching or Research Assistantships 

These assistantships carry stipends ranging from 
$4,500 to $18,000 depending on the qualifica- 



tions of the applicant, period of appointment, 
and the amount of work specified. Tuition and 
fees charged to graduate assistants are $335 per 
semester. Application should be made to the stu- 
dent's major department. 

Academy of American Poets Prize 

This award is given annually to a student in the 
Department of English whose poetry is deemed 
by a faculty committee to be outstanding. It is 
made as part of the University and College Prize 
Program, founded in 1955, established to en- 
courage interest in poetry and writing among 
college students. At The University of Georgia, 
the prize is given in memory of Virginia R. Wal- 
ter, an undergraduate English major from Savan- 
nah. The prize has a value of $100. 

The Gilles and Bernadette Allan! Geology 
Award Fund 

This fund was established at the University of 
Georgia Foundation to provide awards to sup- 
port geology graduate students for field related 
research expenses. The fund was initiated by Dr. 
Jeff Reid (PhD, UGA, 1981) upon the retirement 
of Professor Allard. The award is given each 
spring to a geology graduate student by the de- 
partment head, based on the recommendation of 
the Geology Admissions and Awards Commit- 
tee. Students must apply for the award by sub- 
mitting a one-page project description along 
with a faculty letter of support. 

School of Art Scholarships 

Betty Cabin Scholarship. This scholarship is des- 
ignated to assist a worthy student majoring in any 
program of the school. In most instances, it is 
awarded to an undergraduate, but in exceptional 
cases, it may be awarded to a graduate student. 

Wince Dooley Scholarship. This scholarship is 
awarded to assist a worthy student majoring in any 
program of the school. In most instances, it is 
awarded to an undergraduate, but in exceptional 
cases, it may be awarded to a graduate student. 

Mary Rosenblatt Graduate Award. This 
scholarship was established primarily to assist 
students who are planning a career in teaching; 
however, it is not limited to students majoring in 
art education. 

Dorothy H. McRac Ceramic Arts Scholarship. 
The purpose is to provide scholarships to out- 
standing graduate students in the ceramic area 
based on excellence of work and academic record. 

John I), and Marilyn M. Kehoe. This scholar- 
ship is awarded to assist talented and deserving 
students to study in Cortona, Italy. 



32 / The University of Georgia 



W. Robert Nix Scholarship. This scholarship 
is designated to recognize and assist deserving 
art education students. 

When sufficient earnings are available in any 
of the scholarship funds, the school may offer 
more than one award. 

The Dolores E. Artau Scholarship in 
Romance Languages 

Two awards of approximately SI, 000 are given 
annually to doctoral students enrolled in the De- 
partment of Romance Languages. 

W. Tapley Bennet, Jr. Scholarship 

This scholarship is available to outstanding stu- 
dents who wish to pursue graduate study in the 
Department of Political Science. The amount 
and frequency of the award depend upon the se- 
lection committee's judgment of the qualifica- 
tions of candidates and upon income produced 
annually by the bequest. The amount awarded 
most recently was $2,500. For more informa- 
tion, contact the Political Science Department. 

Best Student Paper Award — Institute of 
Ecology 

Papers must have been accepted for publication 
in a professional journal. There are two cate- 
gories, basic ecology and applied ecology, and 
one award ($ 1 50) is given for each category. The 
names of winners are engraved on a plaque in 
the Institute of Ecology. 

Kathryn S. Bigham Scholarship Fund 

The purpose is to provide scholarship awards to 
graduate students and prospective graduate stu- 
dents with financial need in the School of Social 
Work. Special consideration will be given to in- 
ternational students. Applications should be 
made to the dean of the School of Social Work. 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Graduate Assistantship Enhancement Award 

The award is given to distinguished students who 
have demonstrated outstanding creativity and in- 
novation, academic preparedness, and leadership 
in professional, extra-curricular and co-curricular 
activities. The award provides an enhancement to 
assistantship at $100.00 or S 1 50(H) or $250.00 per 
month starting on September I tor a maximum pe- 
riod of twelve months. A recipient may be renom- 
inated for the following year. Nominations are due 
on August 1 to the Graduate C(x)rdinator. Biolog- 
ical and Agricultural Engineering Department. 
Contact the Graduate Coordinator for additional 
information at gradprog(« bae.uga.edu. 



The Alvin B. Biscoe Fellowship 

This fellowship was established in 1967 by Mrs. 
Helen Biscoe in memory of her husband. Dr. 
Biscoe served as dean of the Terry College of 
Business from 1945 to 1949 and later as dean of 
Faculties of the University. This fellowship is 
awarded annually to two outstanding entering 
doctoral students in the Terry College of Busi- 
ness. Awards are based on scholastic achieve- 
ments and professional potential. 

Coral Jo Bishop Fellowship 

(The Little Red School House for Special Chil- 
dren, Inc.) 

The purpose of this fund is to create the Coral 
Jo Bishop Fellowship, which shall be an annual 
fellowship to one or more students who are can- 
didates for the Master of Education degree in the 
Department of Special Education, College of 
Education. 

Teresa and Robert Blumberg Scholarship 

This scholarship was established to recognize stu- 
dents for academic achievement and professional 
potential. The scholarship is awarded annually to 
an outstanding MBA assistantship recipient. The 
award is based on scholastic achievements and is 
a supplement to the assistantship stipend. 

Boardman, Forehand, Jackson Award 

This award was established by Dr. Katherine B. 
Boardman in memory of her husband, who was 
Professor of Psychology. An outstanding ad- 
vanced student in the Clinical Psychology Pro- 
gram is selected each year. The award includes a 
cash prize of $100. 

Ray E. Bruce Academic Support Fund 

The purpose of this fund is to provide study 
grants each year to students who are enrolled in 
the Department of Educational Leadership to 
support research activities. Awards are made by 
the department head, in consultation with other 
faculty, on the basis of academic excellence and 
the promise of the studs making a significant 
contribution to the field of education. Further in- 
formation concerning procedures for application 
can be obtained from the Department of Educa- 
tional Leadership. 

Glenn and Helen Burton Feeding the 
Hungry Scholarship 

The College of Famil) and Consumer Sciences 
otters this scholarship to doctoral students hold- 
ing assistantships whose research involves 
human nutrition, or crop breeding tor food or 
teed. The scholarship has a \alue of $2,500 and 
is renewable. 

. iuutc S( Hooi Gene r al Informatlot 33 



James L. Carmon Scholarship 

This scholarship honors the late Dr. James L. Car- 
mon, who was assistant to the president of the uni- 
versity for computing activities and assistant vice 
chancellor for computing systems in the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia. The Carmon Scholarship 
is awarded in the fall semester to a graduate stu- 
dent in the sciences and creative arts whose the- 
sis/dissertation research involves an innovative 
use of computers. The scholarship will provide a 
$2,000 stipend for one academic year. Recipients 
of the award are eligible to apply in subsequent 
years. Only full-time graduate students in good 
standing at either the master's or doctoral level are 
eligible. The recipient must have completed three 
semesters of graduate school and have selected a 
thesis research project. Further information may 
be obtained by contacting the Office of the Vice 
President for Research, (706) 542-6512. 

Elmer Jackson Carson Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 

Through a gift from Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ferdi- 
nand Carson, Jr., an academic year scholarship 
will be awarded for graduate study in the area of 
reading, education. The scholarship will be 
awarded each academic year in the amount of 
$750. A letter of application, including three (3) 
letters of recommendation from persons who 
can attest to the applicant's academic potential 
and commitment to reading education must be 
submitted to the department. 

Department of Chemistry — Outstanding 
Teaching Assistant Awards 

These awards are supported by a gift from Dr. 
Kenneth W. Whitten. $1,000 is awarded to out- 
standing teaching assistants in the Department 
of Chemistry each year. 

Department of Classics Summer Tuition 
Reductions and Scholarships for Latin 
Teachers 

Limited scholarship assistance is available to 
Latin teachers enrolled in the department's 
Georgia Classics Summer Institute; in addition, 
teachers from out of state are awarded waivers 
reducing tuition for the Institute to the in-state 
level. Inquiries should be sent, no later than Feb- 
ruary I, directly to the Department of Classics. 

Jerome L. Clutter Memorial Fellowship 

This fellowship was established in 1983 by the 
Clutter Family and the University of Georgia in 
memory of the late Dr. Jerome L. Clutter. The 
purpose of this fellowship is to encourage supe- 

34 / The University of Georgia 



rior students to pursue a graduate program in for- 
est biometrics or timber management. The 
stipend is $5,000 for the academic year. Applica- 
tion information is available from the Office of 
the Associate Dean, School of Forest Resources. 
Applications must be received prior to March 1 . 

The Edward T. Comer Fellowships 

The Comer Fellowships of $2,000 are awarded on 
a competitive basis to new and current PhD stu- 
dents in business administration. Students are 
nominated by their departments for these non-ser- 
vice fellowships, and selection is based on merit. 

Thomas F. Comer Scholarship 

This scholarship is available to a master's degree 
student who will be offered an assistantship. Ap- 
plicants must have been accepted in the College of 
Family and Consumer Sciences, have a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 and have a minimum GRE score of 
1000. A written statement about the applicant's 
professional goals and the need for financial assis- 
tance to achieve them must accompany the appli- 
cation. The scholarship has a value of $500. 

Charles L. Darby Award 

This award is given annually for excellence in 
instruction to the outstanding graduate teaching 
assistant in the Department of Psychology. 

Maurice Doan Memorial Scholarship 

The Maurice Doan Memorial Scholarship was 
established by friends and former students of the 
late Maurice Doan, a University of Georgia doc- 
toral student in Risk Management and Insur- 
ance. Up to $500 per year can be awarded to a 
current Insurance doctoral student who exhibits 
outstanding teaching abilities and concern for 
students. 

Distinguished Teaching Award — Institute of 
Ecology 

Graduate teaching assistants are nominated by 
their students for this award. One award of $100 
is given each year. Their name is engraved on a 
plaque in the Institute of Ecology. 

A.S. Edwards Award 

The student is chosen for excellence of scholar- 
ship, meritorious conduct, service to the Psy- 
chology Department, and future promise as a 
scholar. This award was established by the Uni- 
versity of Georgia Chapter of Psi Chi to honor 
Austin Southwick Edwards, Head, Department 
of Psychology, 1916 to 1951. The award in- 
cludes a cash prize of $200. 



Endsley-Peifer Student Research Award 

This award recognizes students whose research 
during graduate school have made a significant 
contribution to the field in the College of Fam- 
ily and Consumer Sciences. Students must be 
sole or senior author in a peer-reviewed, jour- 
nalism article. There are two $500 awards one 
for physical/biological science and one for be- 
havioral/social science. 

Faculty Development in Georgia 

The Faculty Development in Georgia program as- 
sists in the professional development of faculty 
members in Georgia's colleges and universities. 
Assistantships and tuition waiver are awarded on 
a competitive basis for full-time doctoral study at 
the University of Georgia. To participate, an ap- 
plicant must be nominated by their college presi- 
dent, receive a year's leave of absence from the 
home institution, and be accepted to a doctoral 
program of study at the University of Georgia. 
Faculty members of public and private institutions 
are eligible for the award. Each semester recipi- 
ents participate in a seminar focusing on teaching 
and learning offered by the Institute of Higher Ed- 
ucation. For additional information, contact the 
Institute of Higher Education, (706) 542-3464 or 
(706) 542-0575. 

June and Bill Flatt Nutrition Excellence 
Scholarship 

This scholarship is presented to a graduate student 
in Foods and Nutrition who has excelled academ- 
ically, possesses strong research interests, and 
shows promise of leadership in the field. Recipi- 
ents will have demonstrated service and involve- 
ment in extracurricular activities. Value $1250. 

Food Science and Technology Special Awards 

In addition to normal graduate research and teach- 
ing assistantships, two graduate scholarships are 
available from the Department of Food Science 
and Technology. The Association of American 
Candy Technologists scholarship offers $1,000- 
$2,000 to students interested in a career in candy 
technology. The John J. Powers scholarships 
($l,000-$2,000) are for food science graduate stu- 
dents displaying leadership character. Exceptional 
graduate students also may apply through the de- 
partment head for fellowships ($1,000-$ 10,000) 
from the Institute of Food Technologists. Applica- 
tions for all of these are due February 1 . 

Hazel and Gene Franklin Scholarships 

Three scholarships are available. Applicants 
must be registered in the College of Family and 



Consumer Sciences and have at least two se- 
mesters remaining in their degree programs. Ev- 
idence of academic excellence and professional 
commitment must be presented by the applicant. 
These scholarships have a value of $500 each. 

Gamma Iota Sigma Scholarships 

Various members of the Georgia Insurance in- 
dustry have contributed to the Gamma Iota 
Sigma Scholarship. Up to five $600 scholarships 
are awarded each year. The risk management 
and insurance faculty, at its discretion, may sup- 
plement this scholarship for an additional $400. 
The maximum award is $1,000. 

Genetics Predoctoral Training Grant, 
National Institutes of Health 

These fellowships for graduate study in the area of 
genetics carry a stipend of $14,688 for a twelve- 
month period and, in addition, include provisions 
for reimbursement of tuition and fees, certain 
travel expenses, and limited funds for research 
support. Application should be made to the Grad- 
uate Coordinator, Department of Genetics. 

Georgia Bankers' Association Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1978 by the 
Georgia Bankers' Association to recognize acade- 
mic achievement and potential in a banking career. 
Students holding a master's level assistantship 
through the Terry College of Business and special- 
izing in the field of banking and finance are invited 
to apply for the $500 scholarship. Application 
should be made to the Director of Graduate Pro- 
grams, Terry College of Business. Selection of re- 
cipients is made by a faculty committee. 

Georgia Feed and Grain Association 
Graduate Fellowship in Animal Nutrition 

This fellowship of $2,000 is awarded annually 
to a U.S. citizen who is a graduate student in an- 
imal nutrition or in animal and dairy science, 
poultry science, or crop and soil sciences. Funds 
for the award are provided by the Georgia Feed 
and Grain Association. This nonrenewable fel- 
lowship is in addition to and independent o\' any 
other financial support. 

Georgia Review Editorial Assistantship 

Awarded annually to an outstanding graduate in 
the Department of English, this nine-month as- 
sistantship pays a monthly stipend and includes 

a waiver of tuition. The assistant works with the 
staff of the Georgia Review and assists in vari- 
ous editorial duties. One third-time service is re- 
quired, with a maximum course load each 



Graduate School General Information / iS 



semester of nine hours. The competition for this 
award occurs each winter, and the winner is se- 
lected by the editor and staff of the Review. 

O. William Gottlieb Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by O. William 
Gottlieb to recognize academic achievement in 
business administration. The scholarship is 
awarded annually to an MBA assistantship re- 
cipient based on scholastic achievements. 

Donald L. Grant Award 

This award is given annually to the graduate stu- 
dent chosen for the outstanding master's thesis 
in the applied psychology program. 

Martin J. Hillenbrand Graduate Fellowship 

The Martin J. Hillenbrand Graduate Fellowship in 
the Department of Political Science at the Univer- 
sity of Georgia is given to a student who does re- 
search within the scope of international relations, 
global studies, or comparative politics on the sub- 
ject of transatlantic relations (United States Ger- 
many or United States - European Union). This 
award, for an incoming student, carries a $10,000 
stipend and a tuition and fee waiver. 

Department of History Awards 

The Thomas Pleasant Vincent, Sr, Award. Up to 
$1,500 for distinguished students of history at 
the undergraduate or graduate level with an ex- 
pressed interest in Georgia history. This award 
may be given to students in fields other U.S. his- 
tory, but it does require an expressed interest in 
Georgia history. 

The Warner-Fite Award. Up to $1,200, limited 
to students in American history. 

In some years, the Vincent, Sr., award and the 
Warner-Fite award may be divided among two 
recipients. 

Carl Vipperman Awards for Outstanding Teach- 
ing Assistants. $100 apiece (2 or 3 awards per 
year) for graduate teaching assistantships for out- 
standing performance in teaching undergraduates. 

Nominations from the faculty for these 
awards are solicited in early May, the deadline 
for nominations are in late May, and awards are 
presented in early June. For further information, 
please contact the graduate coordinator in his- 
tory at (706) 542-2053. 

James D. Home Scholarship Fund 

The purpose is to provide a scholarship to an un- 
dergraduate or graduate student in the School of 
Social Work, selected by the dean and a funding 
committee, with preference given, but not lim- 

36 / The University of Georgia 



ited to a student whose major emphasis or 
practicum is the homeless. 

Almonte Howell Fellowship Award 

This award was established in memory of Al- 
monte C. Howell, Jr., research professor of music, 
by his wife, Kathryn, and friends. Its purpose is to 
provide research support for outstanding and de- 
serving graduate students in musicology. Nomina- 
tions are initiated by the School of Music and the 
Almonte Howell Fellowship Committee. The 
value of the award is $1,000. 

Nancy Hailey Hunt and Mary Strickland 
Hailey Scholarship 

This scholarship is available to a master's de- 
gree candidate in the College of Family and 
Consumer Sciences, who has a minimum of 18 
semester hours remaining to complete the de- 
gree program. Preference will be given to appli- 
cants with an expressed financial need. This 
scholarship has a value of $500. 

Walter Isaac Memorial Graduate Student 
Travel Awards 

Awards are for unusual travel circumstances, such 
as but not necessarily limited to, travel to a con- 
vention to receive an award or travel to a labora- 
tory or conference to learn a technique or serve as 
an invited participant in a symposium or work- 
shop. Awards are not intended for routine travel to 
a convention to make an oral presentation or to 
present a poster. Applicants are limited to graduate 
students in psychology who have completed the 
requirements for a master's degree. Department- 
wide, two awards may be given per year. 

Ivy-Smyth Entrepreneurial Scholarship 

This Family and Consumer Science's scholar- 
ship is renewable for up to two semesters in the 
amount equal to fees and tuition for an in-state 
graduate or undergraduate student. The appli- 
cant must work a minimum of 10 hours a week 
to support their education and have an entrepre- 
neurial spirit. 

Martha Jo Walker Johnson Memorial Fund 

This fund was established in 1973 by Dr. 
Richard E. Johnson in memory of his wife. This 
fund is to provide one or more annual awards to 
graduate students majoring in social psychology 
who need financial assistance to complete re- 
search projects. Preference is to be given to fe- 
male students, to be selected by a committee 
composed of the social psychology program fac- 
ulty. The award includes a cash prize of $250. 



Wilbur P. Jones Scholarship 

This scholarship in memory of Wilbur P. Jones is 
awarded yearly to one or more black students in 
the School of Social Work who have demonstrated 
academic excellence and need for financial assis- 
tance. Maximum award for a Master of Social 
Work student is $750 during the first through 
fourth semesters of enrollment. Maximum award 
for a Bachelor of Social Work student is $750 in 
either the junior or senior year of enrollment. Ap- 
plication should be made to Wilbur Jones Scholar- 
ship Committee, School of Social Work. 

Virginia Wilbanks Kilgore Scholarship 

This scholarship is available to either undergradu- 
ate or graduate students in the College of Family 
and Consumer Sciences. GRE scores and cumula- 
tive averages in previous work must be docu- 
mented. To be eligible, applicants must have at 
least 1100 on the GRE or have a 3.5 grade point 
average. Value of $2000 first year, renewable at 
$1000 second year. Six awards are available. 

Louise Kindig Research Award 

The Kindig Research Award was established in 
1995 in honor of Dr. Louise Kindig who taught 
physical education at the university from 1970- 
1986. The annual award is presented in alternate 
years to graduate students with the Department 
of Physical Education and Sport Studies and the 
Department of Exercise Science. The award is 
based on the merit of a research proposal pre- 
sented to a faculty member. 

Rosabelle Carr Koelsche Scholarship 

This award is open to both undergraduate and 
graduate students enrolled in the College of 
Family and Consumer Sciences. Undergraduate 
applicants should have at least 60 hours of 
course work remaining in which to complete 
their program; graduate applicants should have a 
minimum of 18 hours remaining. These scholar- 
ships have a value of $500. 

Leisure Careers Foundation 
Scholarship/Loan Program 

The Leisure Careers Foundation, a non-profit 
organization of the Georgia Recreation and Park 
Association, awards low interest loans to upper- 
class undergraduates and graduate students who 
are pursuing a degree in recreation and leisure 
studies. Repayment of the loan is cancelled if 
graduates become employed in Georgia in the 
field of parks or recreation within one year of 
graduation. Applications must be full-time stu- 
dents who arc pursuing a degree in recreation 



and leisure studies. Application deadline is May 
15. Contact the Department of Recreation and 
Leisure Studies for further information. 

John Sanford Levy Memorial Award in 
Marine Geology 

A fund was established in 1980 in memory of John 
Sanford Levy, an outstanding graduate student in 
marine geology, by his wife, Elizabeth, and by his 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Alvin Thomas Levy. The in- 
come from this fund is used to support graduate 
students in the Department of Geology in the spe- 
cific area of marine sciences. In recent years, indi- 
vidual awards have been as much as $1,000. 
Application should be made to the Department of 
Geology, through the Marine Geology Committee. 

Pauline Lide Scholarship 

This fund, established in honor of a retired asso- 
ciate dean, is used to provide financial aid to 
needy and superior graduate students in the 
School of Social Work. Applications should be 
made to the dean of the School of Social Work. 

Dean Lindholm Memorial Award 

This award provides $300 towards travel to field 
sites. The name of the recipient is engraved on a 
plaque in the Institute of Ecology. 

H.O. Lund Scholarship 

These funds are awarded to recognize excellence 
in academics and research in entomology. They 
may include financial enhancement awards. 

Martha Love May Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1986 by Pro- 
fessor Emeritus Jack T. May in memory of his 
wife. The stipend of $1,500 is awarded annually 
to a female student in the School of Forest Re- 
sources. The student may be undergraduate or 
graduate and must have displayed outstanding 
scholarship in her chosen area of study. Applica- 
tions must be received by March 1 in the Office 
of the Associate Dean of the School of Forest 
Resources. 

Carroll Wade McGuffey Scholarship 

The purpose of the fund is to provide a scholar- 
ship to be awarded to a doctoral student! s) in ed- 
ucational leadership, whose studies will include 
research into the impact of the school's physical 

environment on teacher behavior, pupil behavior 

and/or pupil learning. Further information con- 
cerning procedures tor application can be ob- 
tained from the Department o\ Educational 

Leadership. 



Graduate School General Infbrma 



The Mekis Scholarship 

The Mekis Scholarship is available to outstand- 
ing students who wish to pursue graduate study 
in political philosophy at The University of 
Georgia. The amount and frequency of the 
award depend upon the selection committee's 
judgment of the qualifications of candidates and 
upon the income produced annually by the 
Mekis bequest. The amount awarded most re- 
cently was $2,500. It is expected that the Mekis 
Scholarship will be offered in conjunction with 
other fellowships or assistantships for which the 
recipient is competitive. For more information 
contact the Department of Political Science. 

David J. Mullen Scholarship 

This scholarship fund was established by the fam- 
ily, friends, and students of Dr. David J. Mullen, 
Sr. The purpose of the fund is to provide scholar- 
ship assistance to a doctoral candidate preparing 
for a public school position in the Department of 
Educational Leadership. This $1,000 scholarship 
is non-renewable and is to be awarded during the 
year of writing the doctoral dissertation. Further 
information concerning eligibility and procedures 
for application can be obtained from the Depart- 
ment of Educational Leadership. 

Gwendolyn Brooks O Connell Scholarship 

This award will be presented annually to a grad- 
uate student with outstanding performance who 
shows most promise in the instructional area. 
The candidates must be nominated from their 
departments and must have been enrolled in the 
College of Family and Consumer Sciences for at 
least one semester. The value of the award is 
$500. 

Robert E. Parks Essay Award 

This award is given each year to a graduate stu- 
dent in English whose essay is selected by the 
department faculty as the most distinguished 
graduate essay of the academic year. The award 
carries a value of $300. 

Archie E. Patterson Scholarship Fund 

This scholarship fund was established in 1987 
by T&S Hardwoods, Inc., of Milledgeville, in 
honor of Professor Emeritus Archie E. Patterson. 
The award recognizes superior scholarship and 
is available to juniors, seniors, and graduate stu- 
dents enrolled in the School of Forest Re- 
sources. The stipend is for the amount of one 
years in-state tuition. Applications must be re- 
ceived by March 1 in the Office of the Associate 
Dean of the School of Forest Resources. 

38 / The University oj Georgia 



Joe and Diane Perno Memorial Fund 

This fund was established by the Perno family in 
memory of Joe and Diane Perno. The purpose of 
these awards is to recognize superior students in 
the School of Social Work. Awards include tuition 
supplements and research awards. Application 
should be made to the School of Social Work. 

Perryco Fellowships 

Perryco Fellowships are available for doctoral 
students in insurance. These awards are made by 
the Department of Insurance, Legal Studies, 
Real Estate and Management Sciences and are 
available for incoming PhD students. 

Phelps-Stokes Graduate Fellowship 

The holder of this fellowship must pursue stud- 
ies in one of the following departments: eco- 
nomics, education, history, political science, 
social work, or sociology. The recipient must 
make a scientific study of the role of blacks in 
American civilization. The value of this scholar- 
ship at present is $1,500 a year. Application 
should be made to the student's major depart- 
ment in the university. 

Emily Quinn Pou and Joe (J.W.) Pou 
Scholarship 

This scholarship is open to undergraduate or 
graduate students currently enrolled in the Col- 
lege of Family and Consumer Sciences having at 
least two semesters remaining in their degree 
program. A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required for 
consideration. A written statement about the ap- 
plicant's professional goals and how the scholar- 
ship may assist in the achievement of these goals 
must accompany the application. The value of 
the award is $500. 

Charles M. Rose Scholarship 

Watt Publishing Company sponsors a scholarship 
in the name of Mr. Charles M. Rose. This scholar- 
ship is made annually to a graduate or undergrad- 
uate student in poultry science. Selection is based 
on scholarship, professional and extracurricular 
activities, and departmental and university ser- 
vice. The stipend is $1,000 each year. 

Elizabeth T. Sheerer Graduate Scholarship 

Available to a deserving graduate student in the 
Department of Child and Family Development 
who has excelled academically, has strong re- 
search interests and competencies, and shows 
promise for leadership in the field of Family and 
Consumer Sciences. The scholarship has a value 
of $750. 



Robert A. Sheldon Scholarship 

This award is made yearly to a student in the In- 
stitute of Ecology for graduate student summer 
research. The stipend is approximately $750 
each year. Application should be made to the 
head of the Institute of Ecology. 

Gene M. Simons Fellowship Award 

The purpose of the fund is to provide fellowship 
and research support to outstanding and deserv- 
ing graduate students whose major field of study 
is music education. Preference will be given to 
graduate students whose professional and re- 
search interests lie in one or more of the follow- 
ing areas: (a) music in early childhood, (b) 
research in early childhood music; and (c) choral 
music education. Nominations are initiated by 
the School of Music faculty and the Gene M. Si- 
mons Fellowship Committee. 

Martin Reynolds Smith Fund 

By the gift of $2,000, Mr. J. Warren Smith estab- 
lished this fund in memory of his son, Martin 
Reynolds Smith. The interest from this investment 
is to be used as prizes for excellence in research in 
chemistry. Applications should be directed to the 
head of the Department of Chemistry. 

Charles D. Smock Memorial Award 

This award is given annually to the most promis- 
ing senior graduate student in the Developmen- 
tal Psychology Program. 

Solitary Glove Award 

This award is given to a student in ecology with 
distinguished contribution to community service. 
The award is for $500 and the recipient's name is 
engraved on a plaque in the Institute of Ecology. 

Mary Ella Lunday Soule Award 

A memorial fund was established in 1979 to 
honor Mary Ella Lunday Soule, who was head 
of the Women's Physical Education Department 
from 1925 to 1960. These funds are awarded to 
outstanding women students enrolled in the De- 
partment of Physical Education and Sport Stud- 
ies based upon scholastic achievement and 
professional contributions. Monetary awards are 
given each year to an undergraduate student, to 
a master's student, and to a doctoral student. 



The Miriam Watts-Wheeler Scholarship Fund 

The Miriam Watts-Wheeler Scholarship Fund 
was established in 1996 by the late Mr. Harold 
Elton Wheeler in honor of his wife, the late 
Miriam Watts Wheeler. The Wheelers were 
Doner Friends of the University. Mrs. Wheeler's 
life long interest in rocks and minerals gave 
them many years of pleasure as they traveled 
throughout the United States and abroad gather- 
ing specimens for her collection. Mrs. Wheeler 
was very impressed by University of Georgia 
and Mr. Wheeler established this fund in her 
memory. The purpose of the fund is to support 
graduate students in the Department of Geology, 
including but not limited to, scholarships, sum- 
mer stipend support, travel, equipment, and re- 
lated research expenses. In the past few years, 
individual awards have been as much as $1,500. 
Application should be made to the Department 
of Geology, through the department head and 
Geology Admission and Awards Committee. 

Robert H. West Scholarship 

This award is presented annually to an outstand- 
ing student working towards a graduate degree 
in English. It is given in memory of the late Dr. 
Robert H. West, a member of the department 
from 1936 to 1974, and department head from 
1962 to 1972. The $500 award is made by the 
faculty of the Department of English. 

Karin E. Willis Scholarship 

This scholarship is open to both undergraduate 
and graduate students enrolled in the College of 
Family and Consumer Sciences. Applicants 
must have a minimum GPA of 2.75 and the 
scholarship is renewable. Preference will be 
given to student athletes, including cheerleaders 
and twirlers. The value of the award is $500. 

Heather Christina Wright Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 

This School of Social Work scholarship fund was 
established by family and friends in memor\ o\ 
Heather Christina Wright. The purpose of these 
awards is to recognize students who exempUf) the 
character and enthusiastic spirit of Heather and the 
desire to dedicate their h\cs to serving and help- 
ing caneer patients and their families. 



lull Teaching Assistantships 

Recipients are responsible for teaching account- 
ing principles courses each semester. Guidance 
is provided by the School of Accounting faculty. 
The stipend is $4,500. Recipients must be en- 
rolled for a minimum of nine hours. 



Florene M. Young Award 

Two students are chosen who best represent the 
ideals of Dr. Florene M. Young. The award 
process emphasizes both clear merit in the ap- 
plied science ot clinical psychology as well as a 
Strong commitment to helping others. The award 



Graduate School General Informc 



was established in 1989 by the clinical psychol- 
ogy program, the Department of Psychology, 
and the many admirers of Dr. Young in recogni- 
tion of her pivotal role in establishing a nation- 
ally recognized, empirically oriented clinical 
psychology program at the University of Geor- 
gia. Each award includes a cash prize of $300. 

The Herbert Zimmer Scholar Awards 

Each year an outstanding third- or fourth-year 
graduate student in each area of specialization in 
the Department of Psychology is selected to re- 
ceive a Herbert Zimmer Scholar in Psychology 
Award. These awards recognize outstanding po- 
tential for research and include a cash prize of 
$100. 

Graduate Research Facilities 
Centers and Institutes 

Artificial Intelligence Center 

Director: Dr. Donald Nute, (706) 542-0358. 
The Artificial Intelligence Center is a multidisci- 
plinary group dedicated to basic and applied ar- 
tificial intelligence research, especially in 
knowledge representation, expert systems, nat- 
ural language processing, neural nets, and 
genetic algorithms. The Center currently admin- 
isters a master of science program in artificial 
intelligence. Fellows include faculty from the 
Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, the Terry 
College of Business, the College of Agricultural 
and Environmental Sciences, and the College of 
Education. The Center has additional Fellows 
from institutions in North America, Europe, and 
Australia. Visiting appointments are available to 
researchers with sabbatical or other support. The 
Center has a Worldwide Web page at www. 
ai.uga.edu. For further information, contact the 
Director, Artificial Intelligence Center, 111 
Boyd Graduate Studies Research Center, The 
University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7415 
(dnute@ai.uga.edu). For information about the 
graduate program, contact Dr. Walter D. Potter 
at the same address (potter@cs.uga. edu) or 
Angic Paul (aspaul @ai. uga.edu). 

Center for Advanced Ultrastructural Research 

Director: Dr. Mark A. Farmer, (706) 542-4080. 
The Center for Advanced Ultrastructural Research 
serves the University System by providing a 
repository of facilities and expertise to assist in 
pursuing research and instructional needs employ- 
ing light, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. 
Facilities include two TEMs, a Field Emission 



SEM, two confocal microscopes, X-ray micro- 
analysis, and image processing and analysis work- 
stations. Formal courses in microscopy are offered 
through the Division of Biological Sciences. 

Center for Applied Isotope Studies 

Director: Dr. John E. Noakes, (706) 542-1395. 
The Center for Applied Isotope Studies is a multi- 
disciplinary self-supporting research facility fo- 
cusing on the application of nuclear analytical 
technology to critical contemporary problems. An 
emphasis is placed on innovative applied research, 
including the development of improved methods 
for low-level and ultra low-level measurement 
of radioisotopes, a stable isotope program for 
food/flavor and hydrologic research, an aquatic 
survey program for environmental and mineral re- 
source applications, development of remote sens- 
ing systems for environmental monitoring, and a 
geohydrology research program. The Center is in 
process of establishing a facility for accelerator 
mass spectrometry (AMS), expected to go online 
in September of 2000. The AMS instrument will 
be capable of measuring carbon isotopes at the 
atom level of detection, requiring only very small 
(microgram) size samples, and will have numer- 
ous applications in biotechnologial and environ- 
mental sciences. The CAIS also provides 
analytical services on a fee basis, including radio- 
carbon dating, stable isotope measurements, trace 
element determinations, 60Co gamma irradiation 
of samples, and low-level detection of tritium and 
other radionuclides for environmental monitoring 
and assessment. The CAIS plays a strong support 
role on the UGA campus, assisting academic de- 
partments, research units, and individuals with 
problems related to instrumentation, methods, and 
techniques in isotopic analysis. Offices and labo- 
ratories are located at 1 20 Riverbend Road in the 
CAIS Building. 

Center for Archaeological Sciences 

Director: Dr. George A. Brook, (706) 542-2322. 
The Center for Archaeological Sciences promotes 
research between the humanities archaeology, an- 
thropology, and art history and the sciences geol- 
ogy, geography, geochemistry, chemistry, and 
biology. The Center coordinates the research of 
university scholars in fields relating to archaeol- 
ogy and art history, facilitates collaboration with 
experts outside the university, serves as a resource 
center of laboratory equipment and technical sup- 
port for archaeologists, art historians, and muse- 
ums worldwide, and coordinates interdisciplinary 
undergraduate and graduate degree programs in 
the archaeological sciences. 



40 / The University <>l Georgia 



Center for Asian Studies 

Director: Dr. Farley Richmond, (706) 542-2836. 
E-mail: richmond@arches.uga.edu. 
The Center for Asian Studies exists to nurture and 
guide academic programs and exchanges on Asia 
for students, faculty, and appropriate staff mem- 
bers. While these programs focus on language and 
area studies, they also involve students and faculty 
from law, business, agriculture, education, jour- 
nalism, veterinary medicine, as well as the arts and 
sciences. Specific purposes and programs focus 
on ( 1 ) curriculum planning, review, and develop- 
ment in modern Asian languages and related area 
studies; (2) a speakers and visitors program of dis- 
tinguished Asianists to address and exchange 
ideas with students, faculty, and community on 
Asian topics; (3) student and faculty exchange 
agreements such as the ones recently concluded 
with Kansai Gaidai and Yokohama University in 
Japan and the established one at Kagoshima Uni- 
versity in Japan; (4) development of library and 
related instructional and research facilities neces- 
sary for a credible academic program in Asian 
studies; (5) planning and application for external 
funding for Asian Studies at UGA; and (6) re- 
search and research collaboration on East Asia. A 
certificate program in East Asian Studies based on 
concentration in either Chinese or Japanese is 
available for graduate students and is administered 
jointly by CAS and the Center for Global Policy 
Studies. 



The Center for Computational Quantum Chem- 
istry seeks to develop theoretical and computa- 
tional methods through mathematical models for 
describing and understanding the movement and 
function of electrons in molecules and to apply the 
theoretical methods to significant problems of 
broad chemical interest. Some of the theoretical 
methods under development include the configu- 
ration interaction, coupled cluster, and Brueckner 
methods and associated analytic gradient tech- 
niques. Additional theoretical work involves den- 
sity functional theory, the evaluation of electron 
repulsion integrals, and the treatment of relativis- 
tic effects. Currently applications to several areas 
of chemistry are of special concern: (1) the poten- 
tial energy hypersurfaces that govern elementary 
gas phase chemical reactions, including systems 
pertinent to combustion; (2) fundamental prob- 
lems in physical organic chemistry involving, for 
example, carbenes and other biradical species and 
systems such as the [n] paracyclophanes and [10] 
annulene; (3) organosilicon chemistry, specifically 
the prediction and understanding of the properties 
of silicon analogs of both common and unknown 
hydrocarbon compounds; (4) hydrogen bonding in 
systems as complicated as the guanine-cytosine 
base pair; (5) the study of molecular anions, in- 
cluding systems pertinent to atmospheric and en- 
vironmental chemistry; and (6) chemical vapor 
deposition, a process critical to the microelectron- 
ics industry. 



Center for Biological Resource Recovery 

Director: Dr. Lars G. Ljungdahl, (706) 542-7640. 
The Center for Biological Resource Recovery is 
comprised of investigators from the departments 
of biochemistry and molecular biology, botany, 
microbiology, and marine sciences at the univer- 
sity and from the Richard B. Russell Agricultural 
Research Center. The Center puts special empha- 
sis on the use of enzymes and microorganisms in 
the pulp and paper industry and in agriculture, but 
it is also committed to extending the biotechnol- 
ogy required for the use of microorganisms and 
their enzymes as inexpensive and energy-efficient 
catalysts for converting our main renewable re- 
source, biomass to desired products, such as fuel 
and industrial feedstock chemicals. Studies in- 
clude the physiology, biochemistry, genetics and 
ecology of bacteria and tungi that arc important 
for biotechnological industries. 

Center for Computational Quantum 
Chemistry 

Director: Dr. Henry F. Schaefcr III. (706) 542- 
2067. 



Center for International Trade and Security 

Director: Dr. Gary K. Bertsch, (706) 542-2985. 
Center for International Trade and Security 
(CITS) (formerly the Center for East- West Trade 
Policy) is an interdisciplinary and inter-university 
research, teaching, and service project designed to 
contribute to enlightened trade and security poli- 
cies. CITS strives to produce policy-relevant re- 
search on political, economic, and security issues 
related to international trade and technology trans- 
fer. The center encourages and coordinates collab- 
orative research, teaching, and service-related 
activities within the university, the state, the na- 
tion, and overseas. CITS currently directs interna- 
tional research projects on trade and security 
issues in the new independent states o\~ the former 
Soviet Union, in Asia, and in the Caribbean. 

Center for Latin American and Caribbean 
Studies 

Director: Dr. Brent Berlin. (706) 542-1452; 
Associate Director: Dr. FatlStO O. Sarmiento. 
(706) 542-9079. 



lirticltuilt' School General Inform.. 



FAX: (706) 542-8432; E-mail: clacs@arches. 
uga.edu; Web site: http://www.uga.edu/clacs/. 
The Center coordinates interdisciplinary re- 
search, curriculum offerings, and public pro- 
grams which deal with Latin America and the 
Caribbean. Through colloquia, conferences, 
small travel grants for students and faculty, and 
an undergraduate certificate program, the Center 
brings together researchers currently engaged in 
work in Latin America from all colleges and 
schools of the university. 

Center for Metalloenzyme Studies 

Co-Directors: Dr. Michael K. Johnson (706) 
542-9378; Dr. Michael W. Adams, (706) 542- 
2060. 

The Center for Metalloenzyme Studies was es- 
tablished to encourage interdisciplinary research 
to determine the roles of metals in biological 
systems and how metalloproteins are synthe- 
sized and regulated. Through collaborative re- 
search, discussions, and seminars, new insights 
are obtained concerning enzymes that catalyze 
life-supporting processes such as nitrogen fixa- 
tion, respiration, photosynthesis, sulfur conver- 
sions, and hydrogen production. Use of the latest 
technologies and analytical equipment enables 
faculty of the center and its postdoctoral and 
graduate students to investigate the catalytic 
mechanisms of metalloenzymes at the molecular 
level. The center faculty organize state-of-the- 
art courses in inorganic biochemistry, biochem- 
istry, enzymology, fermentation technology, as 
applied to metalloprotein production, structure, 
and function. 

Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping 
Science 

Director: Dr. Roy A. Welch, (706) 542-2359. 
The Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping 
Science (CRMS) undertakes research and train- 
ing in the fields of remote sensing, geographic 
information systems (GIS), photogrammetry, 
digital image processing, and computer graph- 
ics, particularly as applied to the physical and bi- 
ological sciences. Typical research topics 
include quantitative methodologies for measur- 
ing soil erosion from agricultural lands by 
photogrammetric techniques, mapping environ- 
mental disturbances from aerial photographs and 
satellite images, development of integrated 
image processing/GIS software and advanced 
technologies for monitoring the earth's surface 
from digital image data. Close associations are 
maintained with remote sensing organizations 
and scientists in Canada, Europe, South Amer- 



ica, and Asia. The CRMS provides technical as- 
sistance to universities and to local, state, and 
federal agencies. 

Center for Simulational Physics 

Director: Dr. David Landau, (706) 542-2909. 
The Center for Simulational Physics functions 
as a center for research and training in simula- 
tional physics, with emphasis on the use of su- 
percomputers and novel parallel architectures. 
Because of this work, close interaction with the 
University Computing and Networking Services 
is maintained, and collaborative research pro- 
grams with major institutions in the United 
States and Europe are developed. The Center's 
staff consists of research and adjunct professors, 
visiting research scientists, and postdoctoral as- 
sociates. 

Complex Carbohydrate Research Center 

220 Riverbend Road; Tel.: (706) 542-4401 ; Fax: 
(706) 542-4412. Internet: http://www. ccrc.uga. 
edu. 

Co-Directors: Dr. Peter Albersheim, (706) 542- 
4404; Dr. Alan Darvill, (706) 542-441 1. 
The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center 
(CCRC) includes a U.S. Department of Energy- 
funded Center for Plant and Microbial Complex 
Carbohydrates and a National Institutes of 
Health Resource Center for Biomedical Com- 
plex Carbohydrates. The Center's scientists 
study the structures and functions of the com- 
plex carbohydrates of plants, microbes, and ani- 
mals to determine the role of carbohydrates in 
growth and development, host-pathogen interac- 
tions, and disease processes. The CCRC's 
68,000 sq. ft. building is specifically designed 
for the interdisciplinary and equipment-inten- 
sive nature of carbohydrate science. Scientists at 
the CCRC investigate the chemistry and the 
physiological, developmental, and molecular bi- 
ology of complex carbohydrates having biologi- 
cal importance using advanced analytical 
techniques, including mass spectrometry, nu- 
clear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, 
computer modeling, artificial neural networks, 
tissue culture, monoclonal antibodies, chemical 
and enzymatic synthesis, and recombinant ge- 
netics. The CCRC provides analytical services 
to scientists, conducts four annual extramural 
hands-on laboratory training courses, and devel- 
ops computer software to assist the study of 
complex carbohydrates. MS and PhD students in 
the Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular 
Biology, Botany, and Chemistry can apply to 
conduct their graduate research under the direc- 



42 / The University nf (', 



tion of a CCRC faculty member. The Complex 
Carbohydrate Structure Database and its search 
program, CarbBank, were written and developed 
by CCRC scientists under the direction of an in- 
ternational executive board. The database is 
available on the internet in a Windows95/NT 
format and currently contains more than 49,000 
records. CCRC personnel are presently engaged 
in more than 140 collaborations with scientists 
in North and South America, Europe, and Japan. 

James M. Cox, Jr., Center for International 
Mass Communication Training and 
Research 

Director: Dr. Lee B. Becker, (706) 542-5023. 
The James M. Cox, Jr., Center for International 
Mass Communication Training and Research 
serves to facilitate international mass communi- 
cation training and research programs in which 
scholars from the United States and foreign 
countries, students, and mass communication 
professionals can cooperate. The center helps to 
coordinate efforts to improve the state of knowl- 
edge in the field and to encourage practical 
training, education, and service projects. 

Housing and Demographics Research Center 

Director: Dr. Anne L. Sweaney, (706) 542-4877 
The Housing and Demographics Research Cen- 
ter (HDRC) provides sound housing research, 
promotes a more rational regulatory environ- 
ment for the building community, and dissemi- 
nates research findings to policy-makers, 
interested parties, and the general public. The 
HDRC was created in partnership with the Re- 
search Center of the National Association of 
Home Builders and was officially recognized as 
a center in June of 1996. It is part of a network 
of housing research centers located regionally at 
major research universities. The faculty have 
garnered support from the Athens-Clarke 
County Government, Department of Commu- 
nity Affairs, Georgia Department of Human Re- 
sources, Georgia Department of Transportation, 
the National Association of Housing Counselors 
and Agencies, Inc., and SMART House Limited 
Partnership, Inc., among others. 

Institute for Behavioral Research 

Director: Dr. Rex L. Forehand, (706) 542-1806. 
The Institute for Behavioral Research is a multi- 
disciplinary research organization, the purpose 
of which is to encourage a pooling of the exper- 
tise of staff members and graduate students from 
various departments to attack significant social 



and behavioral problems at both basic and ap- 
plied levels. 

Staff members are assembled from a variety 
of departments from the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, College of Education, College of Family 
and Consumer Sciences, and the School of So- 
cial Work. Staff members hold faculty rank in 
their respective departments and have a joint ap- 
pointment in the Institute. Many hold research 
grants or contacts, and research assistants are 
appointed to further these and other ongoing re- 
search efforts. Current activities include re- 
search health, family, workplace, environment, 
and cognition. IBR serves as an umbrella for 
several enterprises: the Survey Research Center, 
the Center for Research on Behavioral Health 
and Human Service Delivery, and the Center for 
Family Research. In addition, there is a contex- 
tual Research Group and a Models and Methods 
Group. 

The Institute is housed in Barrow Hall, with 
ready access to the University Computer Center, 
a technical library, and related facilities. 

The Institute does not confer degrees; how- 
ever, students interested in the Institute's activi- 
ties may correspond with the graduate 
coordinator of any department collaborating 
with the Institute or with the Director, Institute 
for Behavioral Research, The University of 
Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2401. 

Institute of Ecology 

Director: Dr. C. Ronald Carroll, (706) 542-2968. 
The Institute of Ecology was founded in 1961 to 
promote interdisciplinary research in ecology. 
The Institute currently administers a master's 
and doctoral program in ecology and an inter- 
disciplinary master of science program in con- 
servation ecology and sustainable development. 
A core administrative, technical, and profes- 
sional staff is supported by state funds. Most of 
the support for the large research projects and 
for graduate and post-doctoral students working 
on these projects comes from grants. 

In addition to the faculty of the Institute, a 
larger affiliated membership represents many 
academic disciplines, coming from at least 20 
Universit} departments or schools. Besides 
these academic units, members are on the stalls 
of the Institute of Community and Area Devel- 
opment, the Institute of Government, the Savan- 
nah River Ecology Laboratory, and the Marine 

Science Program. EcologlStS from the I S. For- 

est Service and is Environmental Protection 
Agency, who ctosel) interact with Institute sci- 
entists, are also members. 



Graduate School General Informal 43 



The Institute has a long-standing and highly 
productive research and training relationship 
with the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in 
Aiken, SC, and the U.S. Forest Service's 
Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory in Franklin, 
NC. The Institute also has research and aca- 
demic relationships with the Joseph W. Jones 
Ecological Research Center in southwest Geor- 
gia. Additional field studies are also underway at 
Cumberland Island National Seashore, Sapelo 
Island, the Ogeechee River, the McGarity Wet- 
lands, the Coastal Plains Experiment Station, 
Horseshoe Bend, and the Florida Keys; interna- 
tional field research sites include Costa Rica, 
Ecuador, Guatemala, Puerto Rico, the Philip- 
pines, and Burkina Faso. The Institute supports 
research in marine and freshwater ecology, radi- 
ation ecology, ecological toxicology, evolution- 
ary ecology, conservation biology, landscape 
ecology, restoration ecology, agroecosystem 
ecology, and resource management. Graduate 
students participate in various Institute research 
projects. Their research usually contributes to 
their thesis or dissertation. 

A special graduate student research program 
is offered through the University's Savannah 
River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). Funded by 
the U.S. Department of Energy, the laboratory is 
located on DOE's 250,000-acre Savannah River 
site. The site contains a variety of natural and 
disturbed habitats. Research is jointly super- 
vised by the student's university research com- 
mittee and SREL. Stipends are available. A 
pre-doctoral fellowship program is also avail- 
able. All participants in SREL's educational pro- 
gram must be U.S. citizens. 

Several researchers at the Jones Center hold 
faculty appointments in the Institute. For stu- 
dents working with these faculty, agreements to 
share student stipend costs have been made. 

For additional information on the Institute of 
Ecology, contact Dr. C. Ronald Carroll, Institute 
of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, 
Georgia 30602-2202. For additional information 
on the degree programs in ecology, contact Ms. 
Patsy Pittman, Ecology Program, Ecology 
Building, The University of Georgia, Athens, 
Georgia 30602-2202. Persons interested in 
SREL programs should contact Ms. Jannell Gre- 
gory, SREL, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 
29802. 

Institute of Higher Education 

Director: Dr. Ronald D. Simpson, (706) 542-3464. 
Located in the historic and newly renovated 
Meigs Hall, the Institute of Higher Education is 



an instruction, service, and research agency of 
the University of Georgia and works closely 
with other educational agencies and institutions 
in cooperative programs dealing with planning, 
development, and evaluation. The Institute is in- 
volved in many activities related to the overall 
development of higher education and the im- 
provement of institutions and programs. Staff I 
members participate in statewide, regional, and 
national studies of institutional goals, program 
development, instructional improvement, and 
assessment. The institute co-coordinates with 
the Office of Instructional Support and Develop- 
ment the Governor's Teaching Fellows Program. 
Another function includes cooperation with the 
Graduate School in helping faculty members of 
Georgia colleges continue their graduate educa- 
tion and to improve their administrative and 
teaching skills. Institute faculty conduct numer- 
ous workshops, seminars, and conferences on 
the campuses of other institutions. Closely re- 
lated to all Institute activities . is a doctoral 
program specifically designed to study post-sec- 
ondary education. 

Inquiries should be addressed to: Admissions 
Committee, Institute of Higher Education, 
Meigs Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, 
Georgia 30602-1772. 

Institute for Natural Products Research 

Director: Dr. S. William Pelletier, (706) 542-5800. 
The Institute for Natural Products Research car- 
ries out a broad range of research on naturally 
occurring substances of plant origin, with partic- 
ular attention to plant species of Georgia and the 
Southeast. Projects involve research on alka- 
loids, terpenes, antitumor agents, phytoalexins; 
the development of new synthetic methods; and 
the application of modern spectroscopic meth- 
ods to structure elucidation problems. Research 
involves the isolation and elucidation of chemi- 
cal structures of new compounds possibly useful 
as drugs for the treatment of human disease. The 
institute serves as a training center for visiting 
faculty and for postdoctorate and graduate stu- 
dents who are doing research in natural prod- 
ucts. 

Marine Facilities 

Two units of the University of Georgia's School 
of Marine Programs, the Marine Extension Ser- 
vice and the Marine Institute on Sapelo Island 
operate extensive coastal facilities available for 
research and training in marine sciences. In ad- 
dition, the School of Marine Programs' Depart- 
ment of Marine Sciences operates two 



44 / The University oj Georgi 



freshwater research and educational facilities, 
one on Clarks Hill Lake at Mistletoe State Park 
and the other in the Okefenokee Swamp in col- 
laboration with the Okefenokee National 
Wildlife Refuge. 

The Marine Extension Service's education 
center and shellfish research laboratory are on 
Skidaway Island, near Savannah. The education 
center houses a 10,000-gallon teaching aquar- 
ium, educational exhibits, lecture rooms, four 
teaching laboratories, and two research laborato- 
ries. A 50-bed dormitory and dining room facil- 
ity operate in support of the marine education 
program. The shellfish research laboratory has 
seawater and tank systems to hold brood stock, 
constant-temperature rooms to control spawn- 
ing, and illuminated temperature-controlled 
chambers for maintaining stock algal cultures 
and mass algal culture systems. A modern, solar- 
efficient greenhouse was added in 1989 to pro- 
duce algae. The Skidaway branch of the UGA 
Science Library occupies 6100 sq ft and has 
holdings of 18,000 volumes and 200 marine-re- 
lated journal subscriptions. The Seadawg, a 42- 
ft converted lobster boat, makes about 300 short 
cruises a year in support of the education and re- 
search programs. 

Other Marine Extension Service facilities in- 
clude a fisheries research station on the water- 
front in Brunswick. The 15,000-sq-ft Center for 
Fisheries Research was recently augmented with 
conference rooms and flexible space for con- 
ducting seminars and short courses, as well as 
additional laboratories for research addressing 
the problems of seafood processors and har- 
vesters. The 73-ft research vessel, Georgia Bull- 
dog, is based at the Center and used for gear 
research and marine biological sampling pur- 
poses. 

The University of Georgia Marine Institute is 
located on Sapelo Island in a setting of diverse 
natural marine habitats. The Institute is a valu- 
able resource, both in terms of research on the 
estuarine and nearshore environment and in im- 
plementing the training of students. Additional 
financial support is provided by the Sapelo 
Foundation, a private, charitable, nonprofit or- 
ganization founded by the late Mr. R. J. 
Reynolds. 

The Institute's resident staff consists of about 
10 scientists, who hold appointments as adjunct 
professors in the Department of Marine Sci- 
ences, as well as a number of technical and sup- 
port personnel. Members o\' the campus faculty 
and students, as well as scientists and students 
from other institutions, are in periodic residence 



at the Institute. Field trips and graduate research 
by campus-based groups are encouraged. Cur- 
rent research programs include energy flow, nu- 
trient cycling, and factors regulating the 
metabolism of the salt marsh and nearshore 
ecosystems. 

In 1976, under the Coastal Zone Management 
Act of 1972, the nation's second estuarine sanc- 
tuary was established encompassing the south- 
ern portion of Sapelo Island, the Duplin River, 
and adjacent wetlands and surrounding areas. 
The primary purpose of the sanctuary was to 
provide a natural area so that ecological rela- 
tionships can be studied over the long term. The 
sanctuary is now known as the Sapelo Island 
National Estuarine Research Reserve and is 
managed by the Georgia Department of Natural 
Resources and funded by the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration. 

In addition to the School of Marine Programs' 
coastal facilities, all of which are available for 
student research and training, the Department of 
Marine Sciences also maintains extensive re- 
search and instructional laboratory facilities on 
the main campus in Athens. These are equipped 
to conduct research on a wide range of marine- 
related physical, biological, chemical, and geo- 
logical topics as well as on marine and coastal 
law and policy. 

The department recently established an 
aquatic instructional and research station 90 
minutes from Athens at Clarks Hill Lake, a large 
reservoir on the Savannah River near Augusta. 
The station has a 1000 sq. ft. instructional activ- 
ities building, and is home base for small boats. 
The department also operates the 39 ft. research 
vessel Underdog, used to train students in ma- 
rine and aquatic measurements and sampling 
techniques. 

The Department of Marine Sciences main- 
tains laboratory, office, and limited dormitory 
space in a modern modular building at the Oke- 
fenokee National Wildlife Refuse near Folkston. 
GA. The facility is operated in collaboration 
with the U.S. Fisheries and Wildlife Service and 
provides access to a wide range o\~ open water, 
marsh, swamp, and upland wilderness habitats 
in the Okefenokee Swamp Ecosystem. 

McPhaul Child and Family Development 
Center 

Curriculum Coordinator: Dr. Lily PagUlO, (706) 

542-4929. 

The McPhaul Child and Family Development 

Center provides developmental!) appropriate 
programs tor both universit) and community 



militate School General In forma n i 45 



families with children 6 months to 5 years. Both 
half- and full-day programs are available. Half- 
day programs are for infants, toddlers, two-year 
old children as well as four-year old children in 
the Head Start program. Full-day programs exist 
for three- and for four-year-old children in a 
state-funded Pre-Kindergarten classroom. Chil- 
dren with a disability are served throughout the 
Center. The purpose of the center's programs 
are: (1) to provide training opportunities for uni- 
versity students in the Department of Child and 
Family Development as well as other academic 
units to observe and interact with young children 
and their families; (2) to conduct research on the 
development of children and families and ways 
to optimize their development; and (3) to pro- 
vide a quality developmental program for young 
children and to channel other resources of the 
College of Family and Consumer Sciences to 
families. 

Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center 

Director: Dr. Stanley H. Kleven, (706) 542-5644. 
The Department of Avian Medicine carries out 
basic and applied research programs on the dis- 
eases which are of economic importance to the 
poultry industry of Georgia. Diagnostic, labora- 
tory, and consultative services are provided to 
individuals and groups in all phases of poultry 
production. 

Dean Rusk Center for International and 
Comparative Law 

Director: Professor Thomas J. Schoenbaum, 
(706)542-5140. 

The Dean Rusk Center for International and 
Comparative Law was founded in 1977 as part 
of the School of Law to improve the effective- 
ness of relations among citizens, private sector 
entities, and government at the local, state, fed- 
eral, and international levels. Using advanced 
electronic information-processing techniques, 
the center's professional staff and part-time re- 
searchers mobilize university, business, and 
governmental resources to develop theoretical 
and practical approaches to improve the effi- 
ciency of governance, trade, and investment. On 
occasion the center also helps implement the ap- 
proaches by providing the private and public 
sectors with essential manpower and informa- 
tion. In the past the Dean Rusk Center has de- 
veloped several major initiatives for federal 
action concerning North American cooperation 
and overseas trade regulation and representa- 
tion. It also has analyzed new approaches for ex- 
panding Georgia agricultural exports. The center 



publishes research reports, holds conferences, 
and sponsors research for Georgia citizens that 
cover fiscal and monetary policy, international 
arrangements, and domestic affairs. 

Torrance Center for Creative Studies 

Director: Dr. Juanita Matthews-Morgan, (706) 
542-5104.; e-mail: nitamm@ arches, uga.edu; or 
www.coe.uga.edu/edpsych/ docs 1 /gifted/docs 1/ 
torrance.html. 

The mission of the Torrance Center for Cre- 
ative Studies is to promote scholarly inquiry into 
the study, development and evaluation of gifted 
and creative abilities in individuals from diverse 
age-groups, cultures, and economic back- 
grounds. Center activities are primarily designed 
to facilitate the completion of practica and in- 
ternship requirements by graduate students ma- 
joring in gifted and creative education. To 
signify completion of practicum and internship 
requirements, graduate students develop portfo- 
lios that contain records of the balanced set of 
experiences they have had in teaching, basic and 
applied research, and outreach. University of 
Georgia faculty, both inside and outside the De- 
partment of Educational Psychology and other 
local, state, regional, national, and international 
scholars are also involved in the research, in- 
structional, and outreach (service) activities pro- 
moted through the Center. These activities 
include the Challenge Programs, the Future 
Problem Solving Program, and the E. Paul Tor- 
rance Lecture. 

The Center maintains a comprehensive data 
base of information on giftedness, creativity, and 
futures studies from three major sources: (a) the 
clients who participate in Center programs and 
activities; (b) the work of Gifted and Creative 
Education faculty; and (c) the work of Dr. E. 
Paul Torrance, a pioneer in research on creativ- 
ity, giftedness, and futures studies, and the per- 
son for whom the Center is named. 

Research Organizations 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities 

Since 1948, students and faculty of the Univer- 
sity of Georgia have benefitted from its mem- 
bership in Oak Ridge Associated Universities 
(ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of colleges and 
universities and a management and operating 
contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy 
(DOE) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU 
works with its member institutions to help their 
students and faculty gain access to federal re- 



46 / The University <>l Georgia 



search facilities throughout the country; to keep 
its members informed about opportunities for 
fellowship, scholarship, and research appoint- 
ments; and to organize research alliances among 
its members. 

Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science 
and Education, the DOE facility that ORAU 
manages, undergraduates, graduates, postgradu- 
ates, as well as faculty enjoy access to a multi- 
tude of opportunities for study and research. 
Students can participate in programs covering a 
wide variety of disciplines including business, 
earth sciences, epidemiology, engineering, 
physics, geological sciences, pharmacology, 
ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear 
chemistry, and mathematics. Appointment and 
program length range from one month to four 
years. Many of these programs are especially 
designed to increase the numbers of under rep- 
resented minority students pursuing degrees in 
science- and engineering-related disciplines. A 
comprehensive listing of these programs and 
other opportunities, their disciplines, and details 
on locations and benefits can be found in the Re- 
source Guide, which is available at the world- 
wide web at http://www.orau.gov/ orise/resgd/ 
htm, or by calling either of the contacts below. 

ORAU's Office of Higher Education Initia- 
tives seeks opportunities for partnerships and al- 
liances among ORAU's members, private 
industry, and major federal facilities. Activities 
include faculty development programs, such as 
the Junior Faculty Enhancement Awards and the 
Visiting Industrial Scientist Program, and vari- 
ous services to chief research officers. 

For more information about ORAU and its 
programs, contact Mr. Kirk D. Bertram, ORAU 
Council member, at (706) 542-3184; contact 
Monnie E. Champion, ORAU Corporate Secre- 
tary, at (423) 576-3306; or the ORAU home 
page at http://www.orau.gov. 

Organization for Tropical Studies 

The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS), a 
nonprofit scientific and educational corporation, 
was formed in 1963 by a group of educational 
institutions that have a long history of interest in 
developing tropical science. The fifty-six mem- 
ber institutions, which include Universidad de 
Costa Rica, University of California, University 
of Connecticut, Duke University, University of 
Florida, The University of Georgia, Harvard 
University, University of Hawaii, Indiana Uni- 
versity, University of Kansas, Louisiana State 
University, University of Miami, University of 
Michigan. Michigan State University, Univer- 



sity of Missouri, North Carolina State Univer- 
sity, University of Ohio, Stanford University, 
Smithsonian Institution, University of South 
Carolina, Texas Technological College, Univer- 
sity of Washington, and University of Wiscon- 
sin, are dedicated to the purpose of developing a 
sound educational and research program with 
adequate facilities and support to provide the 
base support for a massive effort in solving 
problems in tropical science. Initial emphasis 
was placed on biological sciences and closely al- 
lied fields, but activities have been expanded 
gradually to include other fields in which study 
may be most effectively carried out in the trop- 
ics. 

The initial objectives of the OTS are: 

1 . to provide a sound formal educational base 
in tropical biology available to all inter- 
ested students and scientists in the Ameri- 
cas; 

2. to contribute to the education of students 
and scientists by providing basic back- 
ground and facilities for tropical research; 

3. to develop an educational center that will 
provide fundamental insight into the prin- 
ciples of tropical biology; 

4. to develop an educational center that will 
provide an intellectual resource in science 
for the hemisphere; and 

5. to stimulate and assist programs of educa- 
tion and research throughout the tropics, 
primarily through the education of compe- 
tent tropical scientists. 

To implement these objectives, OTS has es- 
tablished an educational center for tropical stud- 
ies in Costa Rica. Central headquarters are in 
San Jose in association with the campus of the 
Universidad de Costa Rica, but the entire repub- 
lic serves as a classroom and laboratory. Estab- 
lishment of a network of field stations in 
appropriate tropical habitats where classes may 
meet continuously from one to several weeks is 
an integral feature of OTS planning. OTS is 
committed to the concept that in order to soke 
the problems of tropical education and meet the 
goals of the organization it is necessary to main- 
tain a continuing program of course work pre- 
sented in a rigorous and organized manner. 
Coordinated with the course program must also 
be a program ol research to ensure maximum in- 
tellectual challenge 

Enrollment in OTS courses is based on na- 
tional competition, with graduate students and 
recent postdoctoral lacult\ selected on the basis 
of academic record and interest in tropical stud- 
ies Descriptions of regularly presented courses 



Graduate School General Inform 



and their prerequisites are given under listings in 
biology, forestry, and geography. 

The University of Georgia Tropical Studies 
Group, with about 50 members in 19 depart- 
ments, sponsors seminars and workshops on the 
campus in support of the OTS field program. 
Membership is open to graduate students and 
faculty. 

Interested persons should contact Dr. Cathy 
Pringle, Institute of Ecology, or Dr. James L. 
Hamrick, Department of Botany, who serve on 
behalf of the University as members of the OTS 
Board of Directors. 

Veterinary Medical Experiment Station 

Director: Dr. Harry W. Dickerson, (706) 542- 
5734. 

The Veterinary Medical Experiment Station co- 
ordinates and conducts research on disease prob- 
lems of food- and fiber-producing animals, 
including poultry and fish. Companion animals, 
horses, and wildlife are also included. The re- 
search programs, which have applied, basic, and 
comparative medical orientation, are divided 
broadly into four main categories: infectious dis- 
eases, noninfectious diseases, diagnostic tech- 
niques, and therapeutic procedures. Research 
facilities are located at the College of Veterinary 
Medicine, the Poultry Diagnostic and Research 
Center, and the Veterinary Diagnostic Laborato- 
ries in Athens and Tifton. Opportunities for 
graduate training in the biomedical sciences are 
provided by the station's research programs. 

Libraries 

University Librarian: Dr. William Gray Potter, 
(706)542-0621. 

The University of Georgia Libraries are com- 
posed of three major on-campus libraries: the 
Main Library, Science Library and the Law Li- 
brary, administered by the School of Law. There 
are several small collections such as those at the 
Curriculum Materials Center (Education), the 
Georgia Center for Continuing Education Li- 
brary, the Veterinary Medicine reading room, 
and various lab collections. The UGA Libraries' 
system also includes libraries at the experiment 
stations in Griffin and Tifton and the marine sta- 
tions at Sapelo and Skidaway. 

The UGA Library is the largest library in the 
State of Georgia and serves as the Regional De- 
pository for federal government publications lor 
the state of Georgia. It is a member of the pres- 
tigious Association of Research Libraries, con- 
sisting of the largest research libraries in North 



America and ranks in the top third of these li- 
braries. 

The libraries contain more than 3.5 million 
books, serials, and documents, plus many other 
items including manuscripts, photographs, 
drawings, music scores, audio/video materials, 
and newspapers. The map collection incorpo- 
rates nearly 600,000 items, and the microform 
collection numbers more than 5.6 million. The 
collections support the instructional, research, 
and public service activities of the university 
and are available to library users both on the 
campus and across the state. 

An outstanding feature of the Main Library is 
the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 
a repository of rare and priceless relics. Among 
the special collections are the works and memo- 
rabilia of Erskine Caldwell and Margaret 
Mitchell, the original Confederate Constitution, 
Confederate imprints, a notable Georgiana col- 
lection, many Southern historical manuscripts, 
and the sheet music of many well-known musi- 
cians. 

The Richard B. Russell Library for Political 
Research and Studies, an annex to the Main Li- 
brary, houses the papers and memorabilia of the 
late Senator Russell, as well as the papers of for- 
mer Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Senator Her- 
man E. Talmadge, and many other elected 
officials and government appointees. The 
archives of the Peabody Award house over 
40,000 radio and television programs represent- 
ing the best in broadcasting. 

The University Libraries offer a variety of 
electronic databases for use by the campus com- 
munity. Information in over 130 networked 
databases can be accessed through workstations 
within the Libraries, with most of the databases 
also available on the internet at the GALILEO 
homepage (http://www.galileo.peachnet.edu). 
The Libraries' catalog and selected other elec- 
tronic resources are available through GIL 
(GALILEO Interconnected Libraries), a web- 
based system initiated by the University System 
of Georgia. In addition, specialized electronic 
resources are available in the Libraries on dedi- 
cated workstations. The Main Library also 
houses a computer lab operated by UCNS. Sta- 
tistical databases are available through the Data 
Services unit on the 6th floor of the Main Li- 
brary. Many government produced databases 
can be found in the Government Documents De- 
partment in the Main Library. Additional data- 
bases, full text of journals and reference sources, 
are available through GALILEO, a statewide 
electronic library service. 



48 / The University of Georgia 



More than 460,000 volumes are housed in the 
University's Law Library. It has a complete col- 
lection of American legal resources and one of 
the finest foreign and international collections in 
the country. 

Special services of particular interest for grad- 
uate students include tours of the libraries and 
orientation to their services and collections; in- 
dividual reference conferences for persons un- 
dertaking a major research paper, thesis, or 
dissertation; and access to information in over 
200 computer databases through searching done 
either by the user or with assistance by librari- 
ans. 

For additional information on Libraries col- 
lections and services, contact the Office of the 
University Librarian, The University of Georgia, 
Athens, Georgia 30602-1641, (706) 542-0621. 

Museums 

rhe Georgia Museum of Art 

Director: Dr. William U. Eiland, (706) 542-4662. 
rhe Georgia Museum of Art, founded by Alfred 
H. Holbrook in 1948, serves the university, the 
:ommunity, and the state. In recognition of the 
museum's statewide significance and growing 
national prominence, the Georgia General As- 
sembly designated it the official State Museum 
;>f Art in 1982. The permanent collection of the 
museum now numbers over 7,000 works, with 
primary emphasis on 19th- and early 20th-cen- 
tury American paintings and American and Eu- 
ropean prints and drawings from the 16th 
through the 20th century. The building is located 
in the Performing and Visual Arts Complex. 
Works in the collection and curatorial files are 
available for study by students and scholars. An 
active publications program includes a quarterly 
museum newsletter and catalogues for selected 
exhibitions organized by the museum. The mu- 
seum features highlights of its permanent collec- 
tion and major traveling exhibitions as well as 
temporary exhibitions of other works from its 
collection. Lectures, gallery talks, films, family 
days, and other events are scheduled to comple- 
ment these exhibitions. The Museum Shop of- 
fers a variety of books, cards, and arts-related 
gifts. 

The Georgia Museum of Natural History 

Director: Dr. Elizabeth J. Reitz, (706) 542-1663. 
The Georgia Museum of Natural History con- 
tains the most extensive collection of Georgia 
natural history artifacts and specimens and is 



one of the largest natural history museums in the 
Southeast. It ranks within the top 50 in the na- 
tion in terms of the size of its collections and the 
scope of its research and service programs. The 
museum comprises twelve separate collection 
areas: Archaeology Collection (3.5 million arti- 
facts), Botany Herbarium (200,000 plant speci- 
mens), Arthropod Collections (500,000+ pinned 
insects, 100,000 alcohol-preserved insects), Ge- 
ology Collections (10,000 economic geology 
ore specimens, 10,000 mineral specimens, and 
10,000 invertebrate and vertebrate fossils), Ju- 
lian H. Miller Mycological Herbarium (25,000 
fungi), Pollen and Plant Microspores Laboratory 
(a worldwide collection of fossil pollen sam- 
ples), Zooarchaeology Collection (4,800 com- 
parative reference skeletons), Herpetology 
(37,000 specimens), Ichthyology (325,000 spec- 
imens), Invertebrates (34,000 specimens) Mam- 
malogy (27,000 specimens), and Ornithology 
(5,200 specimens). 

The Museum's collections are crucial to qual- 
ity education in over 20 specialized graduate and 
undergraduate courses in the natural sciences at 
the University. The educational role of the Mu- 
seum extends well beyond the campus. Each 
year the Museum provides loans of educational 
materials and access to its collections to other 
institutions and the individuals within the Uni- 
versity System, primary and secondary schools, 
and state agencies. Also, through specialized ed- 
ucational programs, lecture series, and short 
courses, the Museum reaches thousands of indi- 
viduals and groups throughout Georgia each 
year. 

The State Botanical Garden of 
Georgia 

Director: Dr. A. Jefferson Lewis, III, (706) 542- 
1 244; http://www.uga.edu/botgarden. 
The State Botanical Garden is a public educa- 
tional facility under the auspices of the Univer- 
sity of Georgia. Its mission is to acquire and 
disseminate botanical knowledge and to foster 
appreciation, understanding, and stewardship of 
plants and nature through research, educational 
programs, plant collections, and horticultural 
displays. The Garden is located two miles south 
of campus. Founded in 1%8. it now encom- 
passes more than 3(K) acres, much of which bor- 
ders the Middle Oconee Ri\er. The Garden 
features a number o\' specialty Gardens and col- 
lections plus five miles of nature trails. The 
modern Visitor Center/Conservator} features a 
permanent display o( tropical and semitropical 



Graduate School General Informc 



plants along with classrooms, a gift shop, cafe, 
and other visitor facilities. The adjacent Interna- 
tional Garden includes an herb and physic gar- 
den, a bog garden, a collection of endangered 
plants of the southeastern United States, as well 
as representative species from the floras of the 
Mediterranean region, Latin America, China, 
and the southeastern states. The nearly 2,500 
types of plants in the accessioned collections are 
about equally divided between species and culti- 
vated varieties. 

The Garden is a living laboratory for univer- 
sity teaching and research. Students and faculty 
utilize the collections and natural plant commu- 
nities for studies in a variety of disciplines, in- 
cluding plant reproductive biology, vegetation 
analysis, ecosystem studies, plant pathology, 
animal behavior, taxonomy, plant physiology, 



horticultural trials, museum studies, and anthro- 
pology. Conservation programs at the Garden 
focus on rare and endangered species of Georgia 
and adjacent states. The Garden is a member of 
the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance 
(GPCA), the American Association of Botanical 
Gardens and Arboreta (AABGA) and Botanic 
Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), the 
latter a worldwide network of botanical gardens 
and arboreta committed to conservation educa- 
tion and research. A computerized geographic 
information system (GIS) is under development 
to facilitate and promote research activities. Stu- 
dents and faculty are encouraged to contact the 
Director of Research at (706) 542-6144 for fur- 
ther information concerning academic use of the 
Garden facilities. 



50 / The University of Georgia 



GENERAL DEGREES 




General Degrees 



Master of Arts (MA) and 
Master of Science (MS) 

Master of Arts 

The Master of Arts degree will be conferred 
upon candidates who have met the requirements 
of this degree with major study in one of the fol- 
lowing fields: anthropology, art history, business 
administration, classics, comparative literature, 
economics, education, English, French, geogra- 
phy, German, Greek, history, journalism and 
mass communication, Latin, linguistics, mathe- 
matics, mathematics non-thesis, music, philoso- 
phy, political science, religion, Romance 
languages, sociology, Spanish, and speech com- 
munication. 

Master of Science 

The Master of Science degree will be conferred 
upon candidates who have met prescribed require- 
ments, with major study in one of the following 
fields: agricultural economics; agricultural engi- 
neering; agronomy; anatomy (veterinary); animal 
science; artificial intelligence; biochemistry and 
molecular biology; biological engineering; 
botany; cellular biology; chemistry; child and 
family development; computer science; conserva- 
tion ecology and sustainable development; dairy 
science; ecology; entomology; environmental 
economics; environmental health; food science; 
foods and nutrition; forest resources; genetics; ge- 
ography; geology; horticulture; housing and con- 
sumer economics; marine sciences, medical 
microbiology; microbiology; pharmacology (vet- 
erinary); pharmacy; physics; physiology (veteri- 
nary); plant pathology; poultry science; 
psychology; statistics; textiles, merchandising, 
and interiors; toxicology; veterinary parasitology; 
and veterinary pathology. 

Requirements 

1. Admission. An applicant may be admitted 
as a prospective candidate for the Master of Arts 



or Master of Science degree upon recommenda- 
tion of the major department and approval of the 
dean of the Graduate School. 

2. Residence. The minimum residence re- 
quirement is one academic year (two semesters 
of full-time study). 

3. Time Limit. All requirements for the degree 
must be completed within six years beginning 
with the first registration for graduate courses on 
the program of study. An extension of time may 
be granted only for conditions beyond the con- 
trol of the individual. 

4. Research Skills Requirements. Upon the 
option of the student's major department, a read- 
ing knowledge of a modern foreign language or 
other research skills may be required of a candi- 
date for the Master of Arts or the Master of Sci- 
ence degrees. A prospective student should 
request information concerning the research 
skills requirements from the departmental grad- 
uate coordinator if the requirements are not de- 
scribed under the departmental heading in this 
bulletin. 

5. Advisory Committee. Before the end of the 
first semester of residence and upon the recom- 
mendation of the departmental graduate coordi- 
nator, the dean of the Graduate School shall 
appoint an advisory committee for the student. 
The committee will consist of a major professor, 
as chairman, and two additional members. The 
major professor and at least one of the other 
members of the committee must be members or 
provisional members of the graduate faculty. 
Only faculty members of the rank of assistant 
professor or above, or the equivalent, are per- 
mitted to serve as committee members. The 
committee will be recommended to the dean of 
the Graduate School by the graduate coordinator 
after consultation with the student and faculty 
members involved. 

The advisory committee, in consultation with 
the student, is charged with planning the stu- 
dent's program of study. It is also charged with 
approving the program of study, reading and ap- 



52 / The University of Ceori>ia 



proving the thesis, and administering the final 
examination. 

6. Program of Study. A student must complete 
a program of study which constitutes a logical 
whole. Master of Arts and Master of Science de- 
grees require a minimum of 30 semester hours 
consisting of at least 24 hours of course work 
and 6 hours of thesis and related research. Of the 
24 hours of course work, at least one-half of this 
credit must be in University of Georgia courses 
open only to graduate students. The requirement 
of at least 12 semester hours of credit open only 
to graduate students may not be reduced by 
credit in 7000 (Master's Research). A maximum 
of six semester hours of 7000 may be included 
on the program of study. 

The program of study must be submitted on 
the proper form with approval by the student's 
major professor, the departmental graduate coor- 
dinator, and the dean of the Graduate School. 
This step should be completed by Friday of the 
second full week of classes of the semester in 
which degree requirements are completed. Ex- 
ception: If degree requirements will be com- 
pleted during summer term, the program of 
study will be due by Friday of the first full week 
of classes in that semester. 

7. Acceptance of Credit by Transfer. If gradu- 
ate credit earned at an accredited institution con- 
stitutes a logical part of the student's program, 
transfer of credit may be allowed when recom- 
mended by the student's major professor and 
graduate coordinator, and when approved by the 
dean of the Graduate School. Such transfer of 
credit cannot exceed six semester hours and 
must fall within the time limit of the degree. No 
grade below B may be transferred. The courses 
to be transferred may not have been used in a de- 
gree program at another institution. Transfer 
grades are not used in calculating cumulative av- 
erages. All requests for transfer credit, with ac- 
companying official transcripts, must be in the 
Graduate School at least 30 days prior to the 
time the student plans to graduate. 

8. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program of study. 

9. Thesis. A candidate must submit a thesis 
which shows independent judgment in develop- 
ing a problem from primary sources. (In the De- 
partments of Mathematics and Statistics, the 
thesis requirement may be replaced by nine se- 
mester hours of graduate work in 8000-level 
courses.) The thesis shall be written under the 
direction of the student's major professor. The 



thesis must be approved by the major professor, 
who will distribute copies to the remaining 
members of the advisory committee and sched- 
ule a final examination. Written assent of two of 
the three committee members will be required 
before a thesis will be approved as ready for a 
final defense. 

One complete copy of the thesis must be sub- 
mitted to the Graduate School no later than three 
weeks prior to graduation for a format check. All 
requirements for the thesis must be completed 
no later than one full week prior to graduation. 

A candidate must register for at least three se- 
mester hours of thesis under the course number 
7300. Instructions for typing the thesis may be 
obtained in the Graduate School. 

10. Final Examination. A final examination 
on both the program of study and the thesis is re- 
quired of all Master of Arts and Master of Sci- 
ence candidates. That part of the examination 
dealing with the program of study may be writ- 
ten or oral; that part concerned with the thesis 
must be an oral examination. The final examina- 
tion will be administered by the advisory com- 
mittee, with the major professor serving as 
chairman. All members of the advisory commit- 
tee must be present. 

1 1 . Binding the Thesis. Three copies of the 
thesis must be deposited with the University Li- 
brary for binding. Each copy must carry a cer- 
tificate of approval signed by the major 
professor and the dean of the Graduate School. 

12. Electronic Submission of Thesis. The 
Graduate School now accepts the submission of 
the thesis in electronic format. The format pro- 
cedures are the same as for that of the paper 
copy, however the submission process is differ- 
ent. Please contact the Graduate School for more 
details pertaining to electronic submission. 

13. Final Clearance. All requirements for the 
degree must be completed and reported to the 
Graduate School no later than one week prior to 
graduation. A student must enroll for a minimum 
of three hours of credit the semester in which he/ 
she completes degree requirements. 

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 

The University established this degree for the 

purpose of providing properly qualified students 
with the opportunity to pursue research and 
other scholarly activities beyond the point that is 
possible in programs tor the master's degn 

present, opportumtv for such advanced graduate 
work is provided in adult education, agricultural 



Graduate .s< kooi General I >■ S3 



economics, agronomy, animal and dairy science, 
animal nutrition, anthropology, art, biochemistry 
and molecular biology, biological and agricul- 
tural engineering, botany, business administra- 
tion, cellular biology, chemistry, child and 
family development, communication sciences 
and disorders, comparative literature, computer 
science, counseling and student personnel ser- 
vices, counseling psychology, drama, early 
childhood education, ecology, economics, edu- 
cational psychology, elementary education, En- 
glish, entomology, exercise science, food 
science, foods and nutrition, forest resources, ge- 
netics, geography, geology, health promotion and 
behavior, higher education, history, horticulture, 
housing and consumer economics, instructional 
technology, language education, linguistics, 
marine sciences, mass communication, mathe- 
matics, mathematics education, medical micro- 
biology, microbiology, middle school education, 
music, pharmacology (veterinary), pharmacy, 
philosophy, physical education and sport stud- 
ies, physics, physiology (veterinary), plant 
pathology, political science, poultry science, 
psychology, reading education, Romance lan- 
guages, science education, social foundations of 
education, social science education, social work, 
sociology, special education, speech communi- 
cation, statistics, textile sciences, toxicology, 
veterinary parasitology, and veterinary pathol- 
ogy- 

This degree will be granted in recognition of 
proficiency in research, breadth and soundness 
of scholarship, and thorough acquaintance with 
a specific field of knowledge, not upon comple- 
tion of any definite amount of work prescribed 
in advance. Evidence of such attainment must be 
provided through the presentation of an accept- 
able dissertation based upon independent re- 
search and the passing of such written and oral 
examinations as may be prescribed. 

Departments that have been approved to offer 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree may implement 
this degree program by the adoption of appro- 
priate rules and regulations. Departmental rules 
and regulations may not, however, conflict with 
the policies, rules, and regulations of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

Requirements 

1. Admission. An applicant may be admitted 
as a prospective candidate for the Doctor of Phi- 
losophy degree upon certification by the major 
department that he or she is a person of proper 
attainment and promise, that appropriate courses 



may be adequately given, and that the student's 
research can be adequately supported and di- 
rected. Such admission must be to an authorized 
field and must be approved by the dean of the 
Graduate School. 

2. Residence. The granting of this degree pre- 
supposes a minimum of three full years of study 
beyond the bachelor's degree. At least two con- 
secutive semesters of full-time work (i.e., en- 
rollment for a minimum of 30 hours of 
consecutive course work included on the pro- 
gram of study) must be spent in resident study 
on this campus. Undergraduate courses taken ei- 
ther to fulfill research skills requirements or to 
remove deficiencies may not be calculated in the 
30 consecutive hours of resident credit. 

3. Time Limit. All requirements for this de- 
gree, except the dissertation and final oral exam- 
ination, must be completed within a period of 
six years. This time requirement dates from the 
first registration for graduate courses on a stu- 
dent's program of study. 

A candidate for the doctoral degree who fails 
to complete all degree requirements within five 
years after passing the comprehensive examina- 
tion, and being admitted to candidacy, will be re- 
quired to take the comprehensive examinations 
again and be admitted to candidacy a second 
time. 

4. Research Skills Requirements. To pursue 
research effectively a student must develop a fa- 
cility with certain research skills or tools such as 
statistics, computer science, or foreign lan- 
guages. The student's major department deter- 
mines the skill or skills required of candidates 
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. A prospec- 
tive student should request information concern- 
ing research skills requirements from the 
departmental graduate coordinator if the require- 
ments are not described under the departmental 
heading in this bulletin. 

5. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program of study. 

6. Advisory Committee. Before the end of the 
first year of residence of a prospective candidate 
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree and upon 
the recommendation of the departmental gradu- 
ate coordinator, the dean of the Graduate School 
shall appoint an advisory committee for the stu- 
dent. The committee will consist of a major pro- 
fessor, as chairman, and four additional 
members. The major professor and at least two 
of the other members of the committee must be 
appointed members of the graduate faculty. The 



54 / The University of Georgia 



committee will be recommended to the dean of 
the Graduate School by the graduate coordinator 
after consultation with the student and faculty 
members involved. 

The advisory committee, in consultation with 
the student, is charged with planning the stu- 
dent's program of study. It is also charged with 
approving the program of study, arranging the 
comprehensive written and oral examinations, 
approving a subject for the dissertation, and ap- 
proving the student's defense of his or her re- 
search. The committee should advise the student 
of required research skills and other require- 
ments. 

Departmental recommendations for the advi- 
sory committee, and any replacements, shall be 
determined by procedures approved by a major- 
ity of the graduate faculty of that department. 

7. Programs of Study. A preliminary program 
of study, developed by the major professor and 
the doctoral student and approved by a majority 
of the advisory committee, will be submitted to 
the graduate coordinator by the end of the stu- 
dent's first year of residence. The program of 
study should constitute a logical whole and con- 
sist primarily of 8000- and 9000-level courses in 
addition to research and independent study. 

A final program of study will be submitted to 
the Graduate School prior to notification of the 
comprehensive examination. This program of 
study must be submitted on the proper form for 
approval by the advisory committee, the gradu- 
ate coordinator, and the dean of the Graduate 
School. The final program of study must show 
all graduate courses relevant to the doctoral pro- 
gram (including courses from the master's de- 
gree and courses transferred from other 
universities), and not just courses satisfying the 
minimum degree requirement. A minimum of 
three hours of 9300, doctoral dissertation, must 
be included on the program of study. 

Each department should evaluate carefully 
and fully each doctoral student's progress and 
qualifications at the end of the first year of study 
in order to advise the student whether or not to 
continue in the program. 

8. Comprehensive Examinations. A student 
must pass formal, comprehensive written and 
oral examinations before being admitted to can- 
didacy for the degree. These examinations are 
administered by the student's advisory commit- 
tee. 

The written comprehensive examination, al- 
though administered by the advisory committee, 
may be prepared and graded according to the 
procedures and policies in effect in the student's 



department. The oral comprehensive examina- 
tion will be an inclusive examination within the 
student's field of study. An examination of the 
student's dissertation prospectus may precede or 
follow the oral comprehensive examination but 
may not take the place of the oral comprehen- 
sive examination. All members of the student's 
advisory committee must be present for the en- 
tire period of both oral examinations. 

The oral comprehensive examination is open 
to all members of the faculty and shall be an- 
nounced by the Graduate School. The graduate 
coordinator must notify the Graduate School of 
the time and place of this examination at least 
two weeks before the date of the examination. 
This notice must be in writing. Following each 
examination, written and oral, each member of 
the advisory committee will cast a written vote 
of pass or fail on the examination. At least four 
out of a possible five positive votes are required 
to pass each examination. The results of both ex- 
aminations will be reported to the Graduate 
School. 

9. Admission to Candidacy. The student is re- 
sponsible for initiating an application for admis- 
sion to candidacy so that it is filed with the dean 
of the Graduate School at least two full semes- 
ters before the date of graduation. This applica- 
tion is a certification by the student's major 
department that the student has demonstrated 
ability to do acceptable graduate work in the 
chosen field of study and that: 

( 1 ) all prerequisites set as a condition to ad- 
mission have been satisfactorily com- 
pleted; 

(2) research skills requirements, if applica- 
ble, have been met; 

(3) the final program of study has been ap- 
proved by the advisory committee, the 
graduate coordinator, and the dean of the 
Graduate School; 

(4) an average of 3.0 (B) has been main- 
tained on all graduate courses taken and 
on all completed graduate courses on the 
program o\' study (no eourse with a grade 
below C may be placed on the final pro- 
gram of study); 

(5) written and oral comprehensive exami- 
nations have been passed and reported to 
the Graduate School; 

(6) the advisory committee, including any 
necessary changes in the membership, is 

confirmed and all its members have been 
notified ot the appointment: and 

(7) the residence requirement has been met 



Graduate School General Degn < 55 



After admission to candidacy, a student must 
register for at least two additional semesters and 
a total minimum of ten hours of dissertation or 
other appropriate credit. A student must register 
for a minimum of three hours of credit in any se- 
mester when using University facilities and/or 
staff time. 

Once a student has been admitted to candi- 
dacy, the department has an ethical responsibil- 
ity to ensure that appropriate faculty mentorship 
is provided to the candidate for completion of 
the degree. 

10. Dissertation Planning. A student pursuing 
this degree must present a dissertation on some 
subject connected with his or her major field of 
study. The dissertation must represent originality 
in research, independent thinking, scholarly 
ability, and technical mastery of a field of study. 
The conclusions must be logical, the literary 
form must be acceptable, and the contribution to 
knowledge merit publication. 

Persons who serve on the advisory committee 
at the time the dissertation research is under- 
taken must be faculty members knowledgeable 
in the areas of the student's research. They 
should be selected irrespective of their depart- 
mental affiliation. Sometimes membership of 
the advisory committee will remain unchanged 
during a student's entire doctoral program, while 
at other times changes in the original committee 
will be necessary. 

The major professor has the primary responsi- 
bility for guiding research, but the student 
should consult all members of the advisory com- 
mittee to draw upon their expertise in relevant 
areas. 

The major professor and advisory committee 
shall guide the student in planning the disserta- 
tion. The student will prepare a dissertation 
prospectus. When the major professor certifies 
that the dissertation prospectus is satisfactory, it 
must be formally considered by the advisory 
committee in a meeting with the student. This 
formal consideration may not take the place of 
the comprehensive oral examination. 

Approval of the dissertation prospectus signi- 
fies that members of the advisory committee be- 
lieve that it proposes a satisfactory research 
study. Approval of the prospectus requires the 
agreement of at least four of the five members of 
the advisory committee as evidenced by their 
signing an appropriate form, which, together 
with the approved prospectus, is filed with the 
graduate coordinator. 

1 1 . Dissertation Approval and Defense. When 
the major professor is satisfied with the com- 

56 / The University cf Georgia 



pleted dissertation, he or she will certify that it 
has his or her approval and is ready to be read. 
The major professor will then distribute copies 
of the dissertation to the remaining members of 
the advisory committee, schedule a final oral de- 
fense, and notify the Graduate School at least 
two weeks prior to the defense. Subsequently, 
the Graduate School will announce the time and 
place of the defense of the dissertation to the 
University community. The committee members 
will have three weeks to read and evaluate the 
completed dissertation. 

Written assent of three of the four committee 
members (other than the major professor) will 
be required before a dissertation will be ap- 
proved as ready for a final defense. If the advi- 
sory committee declines to approve the 
dissertation as ready for the final defense, the 
major professor will notify the student and the 
Graduate School. 

The defense of the dissertation will be chaired 
by the student's major professor and attended by 
all members of the advisory committee. Four of 
the five members of the advisory committee 
must approve the student's dissertation and de- 
fense and must certify their approval in writing. 
The results of the defense of the dissertation 
must be reported to the Graduate School at least 
one week prior to graduation. 

Once the dissertation has been approved by 
the advisory committee and the final oral exam- 
ination has been passed, the dissertation must be 
submitted to the Graduate School for final ap- 
proval no later than the last day of classes of the 
following semester. Dissertations which are not 
submitted by this deadline must be defended 
again and approved by the Advisory Committee 
before they will be considered by the Graduate 
School for final approval. 

12. Binding the Dissertation. Three official 
copies of the dissertation must be filed in the 
University Library for binding. Each copy must 
carry a certificate of approval signed by the 
major professor and the dean of the Graduate 
School. 

13. Electronic Submission of Dissertation. 
The Graduate School now accepts the submis- 
sion of the dissertation in electronic format. The 
format procedures are the same as for that of the 
paper copy, however the submission process is 
different. Please contact the Graduate School foi 
more details pertaining to electronic submission 

14. Other Requirements. Before the degree 
will be awarded, the student must file a copy ol 
the abstract of the dissertation (not more thar 
350 words) with the Graduate School and the li- 



brary. At the same time, the student must submit 
a receipt showing that he or she has deposited 
with the treasurer of the University the amount 
of $55 to cover the cost of microfilming the dis- 
sertation. 

All requirements for the degree must be com- 
pleted and reported to the Graduate School no 
later than one week prior to graduation. A stu- 
dent must enroll for a minimum of three hours of 
credit the semester in which graduation require- 
ments are completed. 

Interdisciplinary Program 

Toxicology 

Cham E. Dallas, Director and Chair of Coordi- 
nating Committee 

Raghubir Sharma, Graduate Coordinator, 542- 
2788 

(Veterinary Medicine Building) 

The Toxicology Program is an interdisciplinary 
program designed to train students to assume 
positions as toxicologists in academia, industry 
and government. The faculty participants come 
from a number of departments to which persons 
may apply for admission. These include ecol- 
ogy, entomology, environmental health science, 
foods and nutrition, forest resources, medical 
microbiology, pathology, pharmaceutical and 
biomedical sciences, physiology and pharmacol- 
ogy, and poultry science. The Toxicology Fac- 
ulty cooperate both in graduate training and in 
collaborative research. Thus, graduate students 
interact with scientists from different disciplines 
and have the opportunity to specialize in one of 
a number of areas. 

Toxicology is the study of harmful effects of 
chemicals on humans and other living organ- 
isms. It is inherently a broad, multi-disciplinary 
field requiring expertise in a number of biologi- 
cal sciences. In recognition of this breadth, the 
program has two parallel tracks: (a) human and 
animal toxicology; and (b) environmental toxi- 
cology. The focus of each track is different, but 
there is overlap of prerequisites and core course 
requirements. Courses listed under a number of 
departments are available for the program. Re- 
quired courses for the human and animal track 
include biochemistry, physiology and pathology. 
Requirements for the environmental track in- 
clude biochemistry, environmental chemistry, 
and population and ecosystem ecology. Princi- 
ples of toxicology, chemical toxicology, and 
graduate seminar are required courses for both 
tracks. Other core courses for the environmental 



tract are aquatic toxicology and quantitative eco- 
logical toxicology. The organ system toxicology 
course is required for the human and animal 
track. Students may select from a variety of elec- 
tives according to their own interests and pro- 
gram of study. 

Graduate students may obtain a Master of Sci- 
ence or Doctor of Philosophy, with a major in 
toxicology. Individuals can initially contact the 
Graduate Coordinator of the Interdisciplinary 
Graduate Program in Toxicology for informa- 
tion. Visits will be set up with faculty working in 
a person's area(s) of interest. Applications for 
admission can be made to either to the toxicol- 
ogy program or the home department of the fac- 
ulty member with whom the applicant wants to 
work. The student is assisted in selecting a pro- 
gram of study and research topic by an advisory 
committee chaired by the major professor. Each 
student must pass a written and an oral qualify- 
ing examination. After being admitted to candi- 
dacy, a thesis or dissertation must be completed. 
The successful candidate who majors in toxicol- 
ogy will receive a master's or doctorate degree 
through the home department of his/her major 
professor. 



Graduate School General Degrees I 57 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 




Professional Degrees 



Master's Degrees 

General Requirements 

Listed below are the general requirements gov- 
erning professional master's degree programs. 
For policies pertaining to the Master of Laws 
(LLM) degree, which deviate from these general 
requirements, see the LLM program description. 

1 . Admission. An applicant may be admitted as 
a prospective candidate for a professional degree 
upon the recommendation of the major department 
and approval of the dean of the Graduate School. 

2. Residence. The minimum residence re- 
quirement for most professional master's de- 
grees is two semesters, which do not have to be 
consecutive. See the following program descrip- 
tions for specific requirements. 

3. Time Limit. All requirements for a profes- 
sional master's degree must be completed within 
six years beginning with the first registration for 
courses on the student's program of study. An 
extension of time may be granted only on condi- 
tions beyond the control of the student. 

4. Language Requirement. A candidate for a 
professional master's degree is required to show 
correctness and good taste in the use of both 
written and spoken English. 

5. Program of Study. A program of study 
should be prepared by the student and the major 
professor during the student's first semester in 
residence. This program of study, approved by 
the major professor and the graduate coordina- 
tor, must be submitted to the Graduate School by 
Friday of the second full week of classes of the 
semester in which degree requirements are com- 
pleted. If degree requirements will be completed 
during summer term, the program of study is due 
by Friday of the first full week of classes. 

6. In-Service Credit. A maximum of 1 8 hours of 
graduate in-service course credit taken at non-res- 
ident centers may be included in certain programs. 
This maximum will be reduced by any credit trans- 
ferred from another institution. A student is re- 



60 / The University of Georgia 



sponsible for contacting the department in which 
he or she is enrolled to ascertain if in-service 
courses are acceptable on the program of study. 

7. Accepting Credit by Transfer. Graduate 
work taken at an accredited institution which 
constitutes a logical part of a student's program 
of study may be transferred if recommended by 
the student's major professor and graduate coor- 
dinator and approved by the dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. Such transfer of credit cannot exceed 
six semester hours, cannot reduce residence re- 
quirements, and must fall within the time limit 
of the degree. No grade below B may be trans- 
ferred. The courses to be transferred may not 
have been used as part of the requirements for 
another degree. Transfer grades are not used in 
calculating semester and cumulative averages. 
All requests for transfer credit, with accompany- 
ing official transcripts, must be in the Graduate 
School at least 30 days prior to the date the stu- 
dent plans to graduate. A combination of in-ser- 
vice and transfer credit may not exceed 18 
semester hours on any program of study. 

8. Thesis. If a thesis is required for a profes- 
sional master's degree, inquiry should be made 
to the appropriate department concerning proce- 
dures to be followed. 

9. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program of study. 

10. Final Examination. The candidate must 
pass a final examination administered by the de- 
partment. If an oral examination is given, it must 
be administered by a committee of no fewer than 
three faculty members. The results of this exam- 
ination must be reported to the Graduate School 
by the major professor. This requirement has 
been waived for degrees offered in the Terry 
College of Business. 

1 1 . Registration Requirement. A student must 
be registered at the University of Georgia for a 
minimum of three hours of credit the semester in 
which all degree requirements are completed. 



12. Final Clearance. All requirements for the 
degree must be completed and reported to the 
Graduate School no later than one week prior to 
graduation. 

Program Descriptions 
Master of Accountancy (MAcc) 

There are two graduate accounting programs: 
the Master of Accountancy (MAcc) and the 
Five- Year Program (BBA/MAcc). Each evalu- 
ates students based on a review of accounting 
grades, overall grades, test scores, letters of rec- 
ommendation and other factors that indicate suc- 
cess in the accounting profession. The graduate 
course requirements for both programs are the 
same. Request an application/information 
packet for the latest statement on the minimum 
requirements to be considered for admission. 

The MAcc program is a standard, post-bac- 
calaureate degree. Students must have completed 
an undergraduate degree from an accredited insti- 
tution before enrolling in the MAcc program. Stu- 
dents applying for admission to the MAcc 
program are expected to complete a foundation of 
business and accounting courses. 

The Five- Year Program allows outstanding 
UGA accounting students to begin Graduate 
School during their fourth (senior) year. Students 
complete their final two years of study as graduate 
students and hence may be considered for a grad- 
uate assistantship during their enrollment. Please 
contact the Program Coordinator for details. 

Based on a student's intended area of special- 
ization, the MAcc program consists of the fol- 
lowing courses beyond the basic accounting and 
business prerequisites. Guidance is provided by 
the school regarding specific prerequisites and 
requirements. 

Audit, Systems, or Managerial Track 

• ACCT 7030 Advanced Financial I 
•ACCT7410 Tax II 

ACCT 7740 Accounting Policy & 

Research 

Nine hours from: ACCT 8050, Financial 
Statement Analysis and 
ACCT 8100, Cost II 
ACCT 8200, Audit II 
ACCT 8300. Systems II 
ACCT 7800, Internship 
(maximum of 6 hours) 

• Twelve hours of MBA Electives as 
determined by the chosen track. 



Advanced Financial I 
Partnership Tax 
Estate & Gift Tax 
Corporate Tax I 
Tax Policy & Research 



Tax Track 

• ACCT 7030 

• ACCT 7420 

• ACCT 7430 

• ACCT 7440 

• ACCT 7730 

• Six hours from 

either ACCT 8440 Corporate Tax II 
and 3 hours from: ACCT 8050, Financial 
Statement Analysis 
ACCT 8100, Cost II 
ACCT 8200, Audit II 
ACCT 8300, Systems II 
or: ACCT 7800, Internship (maximum of 6 
hours) 

• Nine hours of MBA Electives as determined 
for the tax track 

Master of Agricultural 
Economics (MAE) 

This degree is designed for students who wish to 
acquire specialized training in agribusiness. The 
program blends business and economics with 
the applied science of agriculture, providing 
methods for solving real-world problems. An in- 
ternship and technical report are required in lieu 
of a thesis. 

Master of Agricultural Extension 
(MAExt) 

This degree is designed especially for coopera- 
tive extension workers, agricultural educators, 
and other continuing educational professionals 
engaged in informal educational settings. In ad- 
dition to general Graduate School requirements, 
a baccalaureate degree appropriate to one's work 
and one year of field experience in cooperative 
extension, or its equivalent, is desired before a 
prospective candidate may begin the program. 
Candidates must complete an approved program 
of 36 semester hours of graduate work. 

A master's report or thesis is required. The 
content of the problem or analysis must relate to 
needs within the field of extension education. 

Master of Applied Mathematical 
Science (MAMS) 

The Master of Applied Mathematical Science is 
a terminal degree program designed for students 
who seek a broad training in applied quantitative 
methods as preparation for professional employ- 
ment in business, government, or industry. For 
such students, this program will provide a StTUC- 



(IraJuaif Sihool Professional Degntei 61 



ture that blends various applied mathematical 
sciences with particular reference to their appli- 
cation to real-world problems. 

The program of study includes 30 semester 
credit hours of graduate courses. In lieu of a the- 
sis, students in the program are required to pre- 
pare a technical report. The preparation of the 
technical report will provide the student with 
an opportunity to apply the tools of the mathe- 
matical sciences to one or several problems of 
interest, by developing appropriate models, ob- 
taining needed data, and analyzing the results 
for their decision implications. The technical re- 
port must be filed with the student's department. 

Three distinct options, at four different loca- 
tions on campus, are available to accommodate 
students with different career goals. A student 
may apply for MAMS study with concentrations 
in: (1) applied mathematics in the Department of 
Mathematics, (2) statistical analysis in the De- 
partment of Statistics, or (3) computer science in 
the Department of Computer Science. All candi- 
dates for the degree must satisfy as prerequisites 
one year of calculus, a course in linear algebra, 
an introductory course in statistical methods, 
and two in computer programming. Additional 
prerequisites are required for some options. If 
the student has not completed all prerequisites, 
he or she must complete them early in the pro- 
gram. Courses taken to meet prerequisites may 
be graduate or undergraduate courses, but may 
not be applied to the program of study for the 
degree. 

Master of Art Education (MAEd) 

The Master of Art Education degree is designed 
for art teachers and supervisors of art with 
course work in curriculum, instructional 
methodology, and educational research along 
with theoretical, historical, and psychological 
foundations of art in education. Students may 
select courses in studio, art history and aesthet- 
ics, and criticism as part of their program. The 
program requires 33 semester hours of course 
work, including ARED 7650, Applied Project in 
Art Education. Prerequisite for admission is a 
bachelor's degree in art or art education. (See 
MEd degree description for details.) 

Master of Arts for Teachers 
(MAT) 

The Master of Arts for Teachers program is de- 
signed to prepare teachers for employment in 
secondary schools and junior colleges. The de- 



gree may be earned in English, French, German, 
Romance languages, and Spanish. There is no 
thesis or language requirement. 

In general, admission requirements for pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Arts for Teachers 
degree are the same as admission requirements 
for programs leading to the Master of Arts de- 
gree. Applicants should contact the department 
in which they plan to enroll for information con- 
cerning admission to specific programs. In addi- 
tion to departmental admission requirements, all 
applicants for the MAT program must hold a 
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college 
or university, with an undergraduate major of at 
least 35 semester hours in the appropriate field 
of study. 

Each student will be required to meet the fol- 
lowing program requirements before being 
granted the MAT degree: 

(1) complete 24 hours of graduate course 
work in the subject area, with approval 
of the student's academic department; 

(2) complete 9 semester hours of graduate 
course work in education and related 
fields, with approval of the appropriate 
department in the College of Education; 

(3) pass a final comprehensive examination 
covering course work and a reading list; 
and 

(4) receive training in methods of research 
in the appropriate subject field. 

The Master of Arts for Teachers degree pro- 
gram has not been approved for certification by 
the State Department of Education in Georgia. 
Any question relating to certification for teach- 
ing in the public schools needs to be addressed 
to the Department of Education in the state in 
which employment is sought. 

Master of Avian Medicine 
(MAM) 

This degree is designed to provide veterinarians 
with specialized training in the diagnosis, treat- 
ment, and prevention of poultry diseases. The 
degree is open to students who hold the Doctor 
of Veterinary Medicine degree or its equivalent. 
Candidates for this degree must complete a 
program of study which meets departmental and 
graduate school requirements. To complete re- 
quirements, the candidate must stand for an oral 
examination before the faculty of the department 
of Avian Medicine. No thesis or foreign lan- 
guage is required. 



62 / The University of Georgia 



Master of Business 
Administration (MBA) 

Applicants with baccalaureate degrees in any 
field of study are eligible to apply to the MBA 
program. Students with undergraduate business 
degrees from AACSB accredited institutions are 
eligible to apply to an accelerated one-year pro- 
gram consisting of a minimum of 41 semester 
hours. All other students are eligible to apply to 
the two-year program. All students must have 
completed at least one semester of calculus with 
a grade of C or better and are expected to enter 
the program computer proficient. 

The one-year program begins in the summer. 
During summer all one-year students take a set 
of four required courses and two electives. Dur- 
ing the regular academic year, the format of the 
one-year program is identical to the second year 
of the two-year program. 

The first year of the two-year curriculum con- 
sists of required core course work. These 
courses provide the student with basic analytical 
tools as well as the functional and managerial 
skills necessary to deal with today's business 
problems. This background provides the student 
with a basic understanding of organizations and 
the role of managers in these organizations. 

The second year consists of sequence and 
elective courses. Each department in the Terry 
College of Business offers sequences which stu- 
dents use to develop expertise in two or more 
areas. Students are required to complete two se- 
quences of at least six hours each. In addition, 
each student must complete at least one interna- 
tional business course unless he/she can docu- 
ment international experience or previous 
coursework in international business. Electives 
can be taken toward the goal of strengthening 
sequence areas or as a way to develop breadth 
across functional lines. 

Two- Year Curriculum 

First- Year Courses 

Fall Semester: 

Financial Accounting 

Applied Business Statistics 

Business Economics (Micro & Macro) 

Management Information Systems 

Business Ethics+ 

Negotiation+ 

Developing Leadership Skills* 



Spring Semester: 

Finance Management 

Marketing Management 

Integrated Resource Management II 

Legal & Regulatory Environment of Business 

Strategic Management and Communication 

Internal Uses of Accounting Information 

Second Year Courses 

Fall Semester: 

Sequence 1 , course 1 

Sequence 2, course 1 

Free elective or sequence 3 course 

Free elective or sequence 4 course 

International course or free elective 

MBA P.L.U.S. activities 

Spring Semester: 

Sequence 1 , course 2 

Sequence 2, course 2 

Free elective or sequence 3 course 

Free elective or sequence 4 course 

International course or free elective 

MBA P.L.U.S. activities 

One- Year Curriculum 

The one-year MBA program is designed to meet 
the needs of students with an undergraduate de- 
gree in business. Entering students must have 
fulfilled the calculus requirement before they 
matriculate and are expected to enter the pro- 
gram computer proficient. 

Summer Term: 
First VA weeks module: 
Business Ethics* 
Negotiation* 
Business Statistics* 

Second 3 'A weeks module: 

Marketing Management** 

Financial Management** 

Survey of Accounting** 

Survey of Economics** 

Integrated Resources Management I** 

Management Information Systems Overview** 

Strategic Management and Communication 



+ = taken in three weeks prior to fall term 



* Required course. 
** Elective course Students will take two of m\. 
baud on previous iourse work and planned se- 
quent < 

Fall//Spring Semesters: Same as the second 
year of the Two- Year Program 

Note: The Business School requires appli- 
cants to submit information in addition to that 



Graduate School Professional Degrees I 63 



required by The Graduate School. Files will not 
be reviewed by the Terry College of Business 
until they are complete. Inquiries concerning the 
MBA program may be made by writing or call- 
ing: MBA Program, Terry College of Business, 
346 Brooks Hall, The University of Georgia, 
Athens, Georgia 30602-6264, (706) 542-5671. 
E-mail: terrymba@terry.uga.edu; internet: 
www.terry.uga.edu/mba. 

Master of Education (MEd) 

The Master of Education degree is designed for 
the student whose vocational objectives require 
preparation for teaching, supervision, counsel- 
ing, and/or first line administration in grades P- 
12 and other educational or professional 
agencies. 

This degree is offered in the following fields: 
adult education, agricultural education, business 
education, college student affairs administration, 
communication sciences and disorders, com- 
puter-based education, early childhood educa- 
tion, educational leadership, educational 
psychology, English education, exercise science, 
family and consumer sciences education, guid- 
ance and counseling, health promotion and be- 
havior, human resource and organizational 
development, instructional technology, market- 
ing education, mathematics education, middle 
school education, occupational studies, physical 
education and sport studies, reading education, 
recreation and leisure studies (plan B), rehabili- 
tation counseling, safety education, science edu- 
cation, social science education, special 
education, teaching additional languages, and 
technological studies. 

Students who contemplate becoming candi- 
dates for this degree should contact the appro- 
priate school, division, or department in the 
College of Education as to the program to be fol- 
lowed. This degree may be attained through ei- 
ther of the two following plans of work: 

PLANA 

The requirements for the degree of Master of 
Education may be met by the completion of an 
approved program of a minimum of 33 semester 
hours of graduate course work. Under this plan, 
the following two courses must be included in 
the student's program: a research course and 
7650-Applied Project in Education. A maximum 
of 15 hours of non-resident in-service credit is 
allowed on the program of study. 



64 / The University oj Georgia 



PLANB 

Under this option, the requirements for the Mas- 
ter of Education degree may be met by a mini- 
mum of 36 semester hours of approved graduate 
course work. A research course must be included 
in the student's program. A maximum of 18 
hours of non-resident in-service credit is al- 
lowed on the program of study. 

Master of Fine Arts (MFA) 

The basic requirements for this degree are satis- 
factory completion of an approved program of 
graduate course work including a creative proj- 
ect or problem which will carry three hours 
credit. 

In art, emphasis will be placed upon a high 
degree of technical and artistic accomplishment. 
The student must also have a general knowledge 
of art history and criticism. Current minimum 
course requirements are 57 semester hours of 
approved graduate course work plus 3 hours of 
ARST 9210, Graduate Exit Studio. ARST 9210 
consists of an exhibition of creative work, a 
written report descriptive of the issues the can- 
didate's work addresses, and a final oral exami- 
nation. Concentrations are available in ceramics, 
drawing and painting, fabric design, interior de- 
sign, jewelry and metalwork, photography, 
printmaking, and sculpture. The prerequisite for 
a program in art is the Bachelor of Fine Arts or 
its equivalent. 

In drama, emphasis will be placed not only 
upon a high degree of technical and artistic ac- 
complishment but also on a general knowledge 
of relevant history and literature. The program 
calls for a minimum of 60 semester hours. For 
persons already holding a master's degree in 
drama, up to six of these hours may be waived. 
Concentrations are available in acting, 
design/technical theater, dramatic writing, and 
dramatic media. The prerequisite for a program 
in drama is the Bachelor of Arts or its equiva- 
lent. 

Master of Forest Resources 
(MFR) 

This is a professional degree program. The Mas- 
ter of Forest Resources degree is an approved 
program of 33 semester hours of graduate credit. 
At least 12 of these hours must be in forest re- 
sources and form a logical major. At least 9 
hours must be taken outside the field of forest 
resources. No thesis is required. 



Master of Historic Preservation 
(MHP) 

Consistent with the multi-disciplinary nature of 
historic preservation, persons with baccalaureate 
degrees in architecture, landscape architecture, 
urban planning or design, interior design, art his- 
tory, social history, law, archaeology, real estate, 
economics, or related disciplines are eligible to 
apply to the MHP program. The MHP program 
is designed to prepare students for a wide range 
of careers in the conservation and management 
of historic resources in both the built and natural 
environments. The two-year course of study is 
structured to develop versatile, competent, and 
highly motivated professionals who can per- 
ceive preservation opportunities in the broadest 
sense and who can develop strategies ensuring 
the protection and use of cultural resources as a 
part of the fabric of urban and rural environ- 
ments. The MHP program will provide students, 
from diverse academic backgrounds, a common 
concept of preservation philosophy and process 
through an intensive, community-oriented, prac- 
tical educational experience which effects a bal- 
ance between academic and professional 
training. 

Accelerated Master of Historic 
Preservation 

With admission limited only to individuals with 
an undergraduate degree in historic preservation 
(from a National Council for Preservation Edu- 
cation member institution), this program re- 
quires a minimum of 30 hours of study plus a 
thesis. Individual courses of study are devel- 
oped, based upon analysis of the applicant's un- 
dergraduate program of study and the skills 
necessary to prepare students for careers as his- 
toric preservation professionals. Individuals 
qualifying for this degree are urged to contact 
the program director. 

Master of Home Economics 
(MHE) 

This program is available for students in the De- 
partment of Child and Family Development and 
the Department of Foods and Nutrition who are 
seeking master's level training that specifics that 
the training is in home economics. Basic admis- 
sion requirements are essentially the same as 
those required for admission to the Master of 
Science programs of either department. The 
minimum requirement for the degree of Master 



of Home Economics is an approved program of 
36 semester hours with two semesters of resi- 
dent study. The program of study must include 
the appropriate 7210 course on which an accept- 
able written report must be presented. 

Master of Landscape 
Architecture (MLA) 

The MLA program is professionally accredited 
and is designed to prepare students for profes- 
sional practice at an advanced level. Applicants 
are accepted with previous degrees in the liberal 
arts and all specialized disciplines. Program 
lengths are determined with consideration for 
academic backgrounds and related experience. 
Candidates not holding a bachelor's degree in 
landscape architecture enter the three-year pro- 
gram; their program requires 78 graduate semes- 
ter credits. Students with the BLA degree 
complete two years of study; their program re- 
quires 52 credits. Practicing landscape architects 
with over 10 years responsible experience may 
be considered for an accelerated one-year pro- 
gram that emphasizes specialization. 

All students complete a thesis that addresses a 
contemporary need in a specific topic area. 

The MLA Catalog, Information for Appli- 
cants, describes curriculum, courses, faculty, ad- 
mission procedures, and allied programs in 
detail. A copy is available from the School of 
Environmental Design, Graduate Studies Office, 
(706) 542-4720. 

Master of Laws (LLM) 

The Master of Laws program combines inten- 
sive supervised work in a particular area of law 
with the taking of courses in related fields. 

A minimum of two semesters of resident 
study is required, with a total of 27 semester 
hours of credit. In addition to the Graduate Sem- 
inar (2-hour required course in the Fall semester 
and 2-hour required course in the Spring semes- 
ter) at least 12 hours of credit must be earned in 
courses at the Law School, and 7 hours of credit 
must be devoted to thesis preparation. The re- 
maining 4 hours of credit may be earned either 
in course work at the Law School or other Fac- 
ulty of the University, if appropriate to the Stu- 
dent's plan of study, or in further thesis research. 
The student must maintain a cumulative average 
of 2.3 or C+, or above, in accordance with the 

Law School's grading system, for all graded 

course work, and must prepare a thesis of pub- 
lishable quality and form that deals with a legal 



Gra du ate School Professional Degrees / 65 



topic approved by the Graduate Legal Studies 
Committee. The thesis grade must be B or 3.0 or 
above to satisfy the requirements for the LLM 
degree. The thesis will be prepared under the 
guidance of a Law School faculty member, who 
will act as the major professor, and who will de- 
termine the grade on the thesis. The thesis must 
be approved as to form and substance by the 
major professor and a second reader designated 
by the Director of Graduate Legal Studies. The 
second reader will be a faculty member of this or 
another university or otherwise a legal expert in 
the subject area of the thesis. Together, the major 
professor and the second reader shall constitute 
the reading committee for the thesis. 

American law students who wish to pursue 
the Master of Laws degree must hold an AB de- 
gree or equivalent from an approved college and 
a JD degree or equivalent from a law school 
which is a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Law Schools, which is approved by the 
American Bar Association, or is a state-accred- 
ited law school. 

Students from other countries who wish to 
apply for the LLM must hold a degree equiva- 
lent to the JD from a recognized law school with 
an academic record and study program accept- 
able to the Faculty of the Law School. Further, 
applicants from non-English speaking countries 
must possess proficiency in English as demon- 
strated on the Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage (TOEFL). 

Each student's record of legal studies must dis- 
play high scholarly aptitude, and the data required 
in the LLM application form must reflect a well- 
conceived plan of specialized study and research. 

For additional information and applications, 
please write Graduate Legal Studies, School of 
Law, The University of Georgia, Athens, Geor- 
gia 30602-6012. 

Master of Marketing Research 
(MMR) 

This degree program is designed to develop 
marketing research professionals with a solid 
understanding of business and marketing deci- 
sion-making. The program, which begins each 
June, includes 39 semester hours of graduate 
work including two semesters (summer and fall) 
of internship. Students without prior business 
courses must complete foundation courses be- 
fore entering the program. No thesis is required. 
A Board of Advisors composed of the nation's 
leading marketing researchers works closely 
with faculty on program evaluation, instruction. 



and funding. Marketing Research Assistantships 
provide a stipend of $5,000 for each student. Ad- 
mission is very selective. 

Master of Mass Communication 
(MMC) 

The Master of Mass Communication degree 
serves those students whose career goals indi- 
cate that additional course work will be more ad- 
vantageous to them than the completion of the 
traditional thesis that is required for the Master 
of Arts degree. The additional course work pro- 
vides an opportunity for more breadth and depth 
of exposure to areas which lay the foundations 
of career development whether in additional 
mass communication courses or in cognate 
courses that tie into the candidate's goals. A total 
of 33 semester hours of graduate course work is 
required to complete the program. 

Master of Music (MM) 

This degree offers major concentrations in per- 
formance, piano pedagogy, chamber music/ 
accompanying, conducting, woodwinds, compo- 
sition, and music literature. Each concentration 
requires an approved program with a minimum 
number of hours ranging from 30 to 36 semester 
hours depending on the concentration elected. 
Each program of study includes a final project 
that is satisfied by a recital, a large original com- 
position, or an approved research project. 

Master of Music Education 
(MMEd) 

This degree offers a concentration in music edu- 
cation or music therapy. Completion of the pro- 
gram leads to the MMEd degree and Georgia 
teacher certification in music at the T-5 level. 
Those who complete the degree program with a 
concentration in music therapy and complete a 
six-month internship in music therapy are also 
academically qualified to become registered 
music therapists. 

This degree may be obtained through either of 
two plans. Under either plan, A or B, an oral 
and/or written comprehensive examination must 
be passed during the final semester of work. 

PLAN A 

The requirements for this degree may be met by | 
completion of an approved program of study of 
30 graduate hours in music, education, and 
music education, plus three semester hours in 
applied problems in music. This program must 



66 / The University of Georgia 






include at least 24 semester hours outside the 
field of education. A research course and other 
courses required by the department must be in- 
cluded in the student's program. 

PLANB 

Under this option, the requirements may be met 
by completion of an approved program of 36 se- 
mester hours of graduate course work. These 
courses must include 30 semester hours outside 
the field of education. A research course and 
other courses required by the department must 
be included in the program. 

Master of Plant Protection and 
Pest Management (MPPPM) 

The Master of Plant Protection and Pest Man- 
agement program is designed to prepare gradu- 
ates with comprehensive, multi-disciplinary 
training in plant pathology, entomology, and 
weed science for employment by industrial, ex- 
tension, or regulatory agencies. 

Applicants for the Master of Plant Protection 
and Pest Management program must hold the 
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college 
or university. Basic admission requirements are 
essentially the same as those required for admis- 
sion to Master of Science programs in each of 
the three university departments cooperating to 
offer the program. Final decisions on admittance 
are made by the MPPPM coordinating commit- 
tee. Students who satisfy all basic admission re- 
quirements, but whose background in pertinent 
biological and agricultural sciences is inade- 
quate, must enroll for selected undergraduate 
courses as a means of removing deficiencies. In- 
quiries concerning specific admission require- 
ments and procedures should be addressed to: 
Coordinator of MPPPM Program, Department 
of Entomology, Biological Sciences Building, 
The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 
30602-2603. 

A total of 33 semester hours of graduate 
course work is required to complete the pro- 
gram. Students will normally complete one in- 
ternship. The internship is designed to provide 
practical work experience in pest management. 
such as with an agricultural consultant, chemical 
company, or the Cooperative Extension Sen ice. 
There is no thesis or language requirement. Each 
candidate lor the degree must pass a final writ- 
ten and oral examination. 



Master of Public Administration 
(MPA) 

The purpose of the MPA degree is to educate 
students for administrative and managerial ca- 
reers in the federal, state, and local levels of 
government. The prerequisites for the program 
include a baccalaureate degree, an undergradu- 
ate course in American government, and a 
course which includes work in accounting, com- 
puter science, or statistics. The program requires 
a minimum of 41 semester hours of course work. 
Twenty hours are required core courses or so- 
cialization courses while the remainder are de- 
voted to elective specialties. An internship, 
full-time for three months or part-time for six 
months, is required for students not having ad- 
ministrative experience. It usually is served in a 
state, local, or federal government agency. Fi- 
nally, the student must pass a comprehensive 
written examination in four fields of public ad- 
ministration. 

Master of Social Work (MSW) 

A program of the School of Social Work, this 
graduate professional degree typically requires 
four semesters of full-time study. Applicants 
from accredited BS W programs may receive ad- 
vanced standing and earn the MSW degree in 
three semesters. Students who transfer from ac- 
credited graduate social work programs are re- 
quired to take a minimum of 40 semester hours 
of study. 

Academic work is divided between classroom 
and field instruction. Selected classes and field 
instruction are held in off-campus locations. Re- 
search is emphasized through evaluation of 
practice and an optional thesis. 

In addition to meeting the general require- 
ments of the Graduate School, applicants to the 
School of Social Work must have completed 
thirty semester or eighteen semester credit hours 
in the behavioral and social sciences that include 
content on the following: social, psychological, 
and biological determinants of human behavior; 
diverse cultures; social conditions; and social 
problems. The Master of Social Work program is 
fully accredited b\ the Council on Social Work 
Education. 

Specialist in Education 

(EdS) 

The Specialist in Education degree is B self-con- 
tained degree program intermediate between the 



Graduate School Professional Degrees I 67 



master's degree and the doctor's degree both in 
time and depth. It provides advanced study for 
those preparing for positions which call for a 
higher level of competence and specialization 
than that of the master's degree but without the 
heavy emphasis on research of the doctor's de- 
gree. 

The degree is offered in the following fields: 
adult education, art education, communication 
sciences and disorders, early childhood educa- 
tion, educational leadership, educational psy- 
chology, English education, guidance and 
counseling, instructional technology, mathemat- 
ics education, middle school education, music 
education, occupational studies, physical educa- 
tion and sport studies, reading education, safety 
education, school psychology, science educa- 
tion, social science education, special education, 
and teaching additional languages. 

Requirements 

1 . Admission. An applicant may be admitted 
as a prospective candidate for the Specialist in 
Education degree upon recommendation of the 
appropriate department/ division in the College 
of Education and approval of the dean of the 
Graduate School. To be admitted to this degree 
program, an applicant must hold a master's de- 
gree from a regionally accredited institution. 

2. Time Limit. All requirements for the Spe- 
cialist in Education degree must be completed 
within six years, beginning with the first regis- 
tration for courses on the student's program of 
study. An extension of time may be granted only 
on conditions beyond the control of the student. 

3. Program of Study. A program of study 
should be prepared by the student and the major 
professor during the first semester in residence. 
The program for the degree shall consist of a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of study at the 
graduate level beyond the master's degree. The 
program shall be planned as a logically orga- 
nized whole, in light of the student's record in 
previous undergraduate and graduate courses, 
performance on standardized and non-standard- 
ized examinations, and the entire professional 
experience. The program of study, approved by 
the major professor and the graduate coordina- 
tor, is submitted to the Graduate School by Fri- 
day of the second full week of classes of the 
semester in which degree requirements are com- 
pleted. If degree requirements are completed 
during summer term, the program of study is due 
by Friday of the first full week of classes. To be 
eligible for inclusion in a program of study, 



course work taken after January 1, 1977, must 
have been taken after the student was admitted 
as a prospective candidate for the Specialist in 
Education degree. A maximum of 15 hours of 
non-resident in-service credit is allowed on the 
program of study. 

4. Language Requirement. All candidates for 
graduate degrees are required to show correct- 
ness and good taste in their use of both written 
and spoken English. 

5. Accepting Credit by Transfer. A student 
fully accepted into a Specialist in Education de- 
gree program at an accredited institution may 
transfer six semester hours of graduate course 
work provided that the courses to be transferred 
constitute a logical part of the student's program 
of study and are approved by the student's major 
professor, the graduate coordinator, and the dean 
of the Graduate School. Such transfer of credit 
cannot exceed six semester hours, cannot reduce 
the residence requirement to fewer than 15 
hours, and must fall within the time limit of the 
degree. The courses to be transferred may not 
have been used as part of the requirements for 
another degree. No grade below B (3.0) may be 
transferred. Transfer grades are not used in cal- 
culating semester and cumulative averages. All 
requests for transfer credit, with accompanying 
official transcripts, must be in the Graduate 
School at least 30 days prior to the time the stu- 
dent plans to graduate. 

6. In-Service Credit. A maximum of 15 se- 
mester hours of graduate in-service credit taken, 
at non-resident centers may be included in a pro- 
gram of study for the degree. This maximum 
will be reduced by any credit transferred from 
another institution. 

7. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program of study. 

8. Final Examination. The candidate must 
pass a written and/or oral comprehensive exam- 
ination administered by the department. The re- 
sults of the examination must be reported to the 
Graduate School. 

9. Registration Requirement. A student must 
be registered at the University of Georgia for a 
minimum of three hours of credit the semester in 
which all degree requirements are completed. 

10. Final Clearance. All requirements for the 
degree must be completed and reported to the 
Graduate School no later than one week prior to 
graduation. 



68 / The University of Georgia 



Doctor of Education (EdD) 

This degree provides advanced professional 
training for careers in teaching, administration, 
and other educational services. The degree is of- 
fered in the following fields of education: adult 
education, art education, education of gifted, ed- 
ucational leadership, educational psychology, 
exercise science, higher education, instructional 
technology, mathematics education, music edu- 
cation, occupational studies, physical education 
and sport studies, reading education, recreation 
and leisure studies, science education, social sci- 
ence education, and special education. Special- 
ization in research training and in subject fields 
appropriate to elementary, secondary, and col- 
lege teaching is provided. 

Departments that have been approved to offer 
the Doctor of Education degree may implement 
this degree program by the adoption of appro- 
priate rules and regulations. Departmental rules 
and regulations may not, however, conflict with 
the policies, rules, and regulations of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

Requirements 

1. Admission. An applicant who desires to 
pursue advanced professional training in educa- 
tion beyond the master's degree, with a view to 
becoming a candidate for the Doctor of Educa- 
tion degree, will be expected to file formal ap- 
plication and present himself to the faculty of 
the appropriate department/division in the Col- 
lege of Education for special tests and inter- 
views. Recommendation on admission will be 
made by the department only after its screening 
procedures have been carried out. Admission 
will be upon the recommendation of the gradu- 
ate coordinator, or an authorized representative, 
and approval of the dean of the Graduate School. 

2. Residence. The degree presupposes a mini- 
mum of three full years of study beyond the 
bachelor's degree and cannot be secured through 
summer work alone. At least two consecutive 
semesters (i.e., enrollment for a minimum of 20 
hours of consecutive course work included on 
the program of study) must be spent in full-time 
resident study on the campus of the University 
of Georgia, one of which may be a summer se- 
mester. 

3. Time Limit. All requirements tor this de- 
pee, except the dissertation and final oral exam- 
ination, must be completed within a period of 
six years. This time requirement begins with the 



first registration for graduate courses on the stu- 
dent's program of study. 

A candidate for the Doctor of Education de- 
gree who fails to complete all degree require- 
ments within five years after passing the 
comprehensive examinations and being admit- 
ted to candidacy will be required to take the 
comprehensive examinations again and be ad- 
mitted to candidacy a second time. 

4. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program of study. 

5. Advisory Committee. Before the end of the 
first year of residence of a prospective candidate 
for the Doctor of Education degree and upon the 
recommendation of the departmental graduate 
coordinator, the dean of the Graduate School 
shall appoint an advisory committee for the stu- 
dent. The committee will consist of a major 
professor, as chairman, and four additional 
members. The major professor and at least two 
of the other members of the committee must be 
appointed members of the graduate faculty. The 
committee will be recommended to the dean of 
the Graduate School by the graduate coordinator 
after consultation with the student and faculty 
member involved. 

The advisory committee, in consultation with 
the student, is charged with planning the stu- 
dent's program of study. It is also charged with 
approving the program of study, arranging the 
comprehensive written and oral examinations, 
approving a subject for the dissertation, approv- 
ing the completed dissertation, and approving 
the student's defense of his/her research. The 
committee should advise the student of required 
research skills and other requirements. 

Departmental recommendations for the advi- 
sory committee, and any replacements, shall be 
determined by procedures approved by a major- 
ity of the graduate faculty of that department. 

6. Programs of Study. A preliminary program 
of study based on a minimum of SO semester 
hours o\ course work beyond the baccalaureate 
degree, excluding dissertation credit, will be 
submitted to the graduate coordinator In the end 
of the student's first year of residence. The pro- 
gram of study must be developed by the major 
professor and the doctoral student and approved 
by a majority of the advisor) committee The 
program of stud> should constitute a logical 

whole and he significant!) related to the stu- 
dent's vocational objectives. A minimum of 30 
credit hours of course work, exclusive of disser- 
tation credit, must he taken at the Universit) of 



Gradual* Schooi Professional Degrees l 69 



Georgia at the doctoral level; i.e., 40 total credit 
hours must be taken at the University of Geor- 
gia. 

A final program of study will be submitted to 
the Graduate School prior to notification of the 
comprehensive examination. This program of 
study must be submitted on the proper form for 
approval by the advisory committee, the gradu- 
ate coordinator, and the dean of the Graduate 
School. The final program of study must show 
all graduate courses relevant to the doctoral pro- 
gram (including courses from the master's de- 
gree and courses transferred from other 
universities), and not just courses satisfying the 
minimum degree requirement. A minimum of 
three hours of 9300, doctoral dissertation, must 
be included on the program of study. 

Each department should evaluate carefully 
and fully each doctoral student's progress and 
qualifications at the end of each year of study in 
order to advise the student whether or not to 
continue in the program. 

7. Comprehensive Examinations. A student 
must pass formal, comprehensive written and 
oral examinations before being admitted to can- 
didacy for the degree. These examinations are 
administered by the student's advisory commit- 
tee. 

The written comprehensive examination, al- 
though administered by the advisory committee, 
may be prepared and graded according to the 
procedures and policies in effect in the student's 
department. The oral comprehensive examina- 
tion will be an inclusive examination within the 
student's field of study. An examination of the 
student's dissertation prospectus may precede or 
follow the oral comprehensive examination but 
may not take the place of the oral comprehen- 
sive examination. All members of the student's 
advisory committee must be present for the en- 
tire period of both oral examinations. 

The oral comprehensive examination is open 
to all members of the faculty and shall be an- 
nounced by the Graduate School. The graduate 
coordinator must notify the Graduate School of 
the time and place of this examination at least 
two weeks before the date of the examination. 

Following each examination, written and oral, 
each member of the advisory committee will 
cast a written vote of pass or fail on the exami- 
nation. At least four out of a possible five posi- 
tive votes are required to pass each examination. 
The results of both examinations will be re- 
ported to the Graduate School. 

8. Dissertation Planning. The dissertation, 
being the most important single requirement for 

70 / The University of Georgia 



the Doctor of Education degree, should demon- 
strate the intelligent application of appropriate 
research procedures to the investigation of a 
problem in educational theory or practice. The 
dissertation problem must be conducted on some 
subject related to the student's major field of 
study and demonstrate evidence of scholarly 
ability and a thorough evaluation of relevant 
source materials. The conclusions must be logi- 
cal, the literary form acceptable, and the contri- 
bution to education theory or practice 
substantial. 

Persons who serve on the advisory committee 
at the time the dissertation research is under- 
taken must be faculty members knowledgeable 
in the areas of the student's research. They 
should be selected irrespective of their depart- 
mental affiliation. Usually membership of the 
advisory committee will remain unchanged dur- 
ing a student's entire doctoral program. How- 
ever, if changes in the original committee are 
necessary, all parties are to be notified. The 
major professor and advisory committee shall 
guide the student in planning the dissertation. 
The student will prepare a dissertation prospec- 
tus. When the major professor certifies that the 
dissertation prospectus is satisfactory, it must be 
formally considered by the advisory committee 
in a meeting with the student. This formal con- 
sideration may not take the place of the compre- 
hensive oral examination. 

Approval of the dissertation prospectus signi- 
fies that members of the advisory committee be- 
lieve that it proposes a satisfactory research 
study. Approval of the prospectus requires the 
agreement of at least four of the five members of 
the advisory committee as evidenced by their 
signing an appropriate form, which, together 
with the approved prospectus, is filed with the 
graduate coordinator. 

9. Admission to Candidacy. The student is re- 
sponsible for initiating an application for admis- 
sion to candidacy so that it is filed with the dean 
of the Graduate School at least two full semes- 
ters before the date of graduation. This applica- 
tion is a certification by the student's major 
department that the student has demonstrated 
ability to do acceptable graduate work in the 
chosen field of study and that: 

( 1 ) all prerequisites set as a condition to ad- 
mission have been satisfactorily com- 
pleted; 

(2) research skills requirements, if applica- 
ble, have been met; 

(3) the final program of study has been ap- 
proved by the advisory committee, the 



graduate coordinator, and the dean of the 
Graduate School; 

(4) an average of 3.0 (B) has been main- 
tained on all graduate courses taken and 
on all completed courses on the program 
of study (no course with a grade below 
C may be placed on the final program of 
study); 

(5) written and oral comprehensive exami- 
nations have been passed and reported to 
the Graduate School; 

(6) a dissertation prospectus has been ap- 
proved; 

(7) the advisory committee, including any 
necessary changes in the membership, is 
confirmed and all its members have 
been notified of their appointments; and 

(8) the residence requirement has been met. 

The major professor has the primary responsi- 
bility for guiding research, but the student 
should consult all members of the advisory com- 
mittee to draw upon their expertise in relevant 
areas. 

After admission to candidacy, a student must 
register for at least two additional semesters and 
a total minimum of 10 hours of dissertation or 
other appropriate credit. A student must register 
for a minimum of three hours of credit in any se- 
mester when using University facilities and/or 
staff time. 

Once a student has been admitted to candi- 
dacy, the department has an ethical responsibil- 
ity to ensure that appropriate faculty mentorship 
is provided to the candidate for completion of 
the degree. 

10. Dissertation Approval and Defense. When 
the major professor is satisfied with the com- 
pleted dissertation, he or she will certify that it 
has his or her approval and is ready to be read. 
The major professor will then distribute copies 
of the dissertation to the remaining members of 
the advisory committee, schedule a final oral de- 
fense, and notify the Graduate School at least 
two weeks prior to the defense. Subsequently, 
the Graduate School will announce the time and 
place of the defense of the dissertation to the 
University community. The committee members 
will have three weeks to read and evaluate the 
completed dissertation. 

Written assent of three of the four committee 
members (other than the major professor) will 
be required before a dissertation will be ap- 
proved as ready for the final defense. If the ad- 
visory committee declines to approve the 
dissertation as ready for the final defense, the 
major professor will notify the student and the 



Graduate School. The defense of the dissertation 
will be chaired by the student's major professor 
and attended by all members of the advisory 
committee. It is open to all members of the Uni- 
versity community. Four of the five members of 
the advisory committee must approve the stu- 
dent's dissertation and defense and must certify 
their approval in writing. The results of the de- 
fense of the dissertation must be reported to the 
Graduate School at least one week prior to grad- 
uation. 

Once the dissertation has been approved by 
the advisory committee and the final oral exam- 
ination has been passed, the dissertation must be 
submitted to the Graduate School for final ap- 
proval no later than the last day of classes of the 
following semester. Dissertations which are not 
submitted by this deadline must be defended 
again and approved by the Advisory Committee 
before they will be considered by the Graduate 
School for final approval. 

11. Binding the Dissertation. Three official 
copies of the dissertation must be filed in the 
University Library for binding. Each copy must 
carry a certificate of approval signed by the 
major professor and the dean of the Graduate 
School. 

12. Electronic Submission of Dissertation. 
The Graduate School now accepts the submis- 
sion of the dissertation in electronic format. The 
format procedures are the same as for that of the 
paper copy, however the submission process is 
different. Please contact the Graduate School for 
more details pertaining to electronic submission. 

13. Other Requirements. Before the degree 
will be awarded, the student must file a copy of 
the abstract of the dissertation (not more than 
350 words) with the Graduate School and the li- 
brary. At the same time, the student must submit 
a receipt showing that he/she had deposited with 
the treasurer of the University the amount of $55 
to cover the cost of microfilming the disserta- 
tion. 

All requirements for the degree must be com- 
pleted and reported to the Graduate School no 
later than one week prior to graduation. A stu- 
dent must enroll for at least three hours of credit 
in the semester in which graduation require- 
ments are completed. 

Cooperative Doctoral Programs 

The University cooperates with State University 
of West Georgia to offer the Doctor of Education 

degree in educational leadership. The University 

also cooperates with fort Valle\ State I'nixer- 



Graduate School Professional A "1 



sity to offer the Doctor of Education degree in 
the following areas: adult education, educational 
leadership, and occupational studies. For infor- 
mation concerning this program, please contact 
the Office of Graduate Admissions, The Univer- 
sity of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-7402. 

Doctor of Musical Arts 
(DMA) 

The program of study leading to the Doctor of 
Musical Arts degree provides advanced profes- 
sional, academic, and research preparation for 
music careers in teaching, performing, compos- 
ing, and conducting. Major concentrations are 
offered in music education, performance, com- 
position, and choral conducting. The School of 
Music should be contacted regarding applied 
music options available within the performance 
area. 

Requirements 

1 . Admission. In addition to meeting the general 
requirements for graduate admission to the Uni- 
versity, an applicant must present evidence of po- 
tential for significant scholarly, artistic, and 
professional attainment in his or her intended 
major area of concentration. Such potential is nor- 
mally documented through an assessment of the 
applicant's academic and professional back- 
ground and standing; an audition; a portfolio 
review of musical compositions and perfor- 
mances; letters of recommendation; an interview; 
and other standard admission review procedures 
as appropriate to the intended major field of con- 
centration. A recommendation for admission to 
the program from the School of Music must be ap- 
proved by the dean of the Graduate School. 

2. Diagnostic Examinations. Diagnostic ex- 
aminations are administered prior to or during 
the initial term of enrollment. Information con- 
cerning the diagnostic examinations is available 
from the Office of Graduate Studies, School of 
Music. 

3. Residence. The granting of this degree pre- 
supposes a minimum of three full years of study 
beyond the bachelor's degree. At least two con- 
secutive semesters of full-time work (i.e., en- 
rollment for a minimum of 20 hours of 
consecutive course work included on the pro- 
gram of study) must be spent in resident study 
on the campus of the University of Georgia. 

4. Time Limit. All requirements for the degree 
except the dissertation or document and final 

72 / The University of Georgia 



oral examination must be completed within a pe- 
riod of six years. This time requirement dates 
from the first enrollment for graduate course 
work applicable to the student's official program 
of study. 

A candidate who fails to complete all degree 
requirements within five years after passing the 
comprehensive examinations and being admit- 
ted to candidacy will be required to take the 
comprehensive examinations again and reestab- 
lish degree candidacy. 

5. Research Skills Requirements. The program 
of study requires research competencies appro- 
priate to the elected major and minor fields of 
concentration. Research skills requirements will 
vary but may include such areas as statistics, 
computer science, music bibliography, diction, 
and foreign languages. 

A student electing voice performance as the 
major field of concentration is required to 
demonstrate a reading knowledge of two foreign 
languages selected from Italian, German, or 
French. A student electing a major in either 
voice performance or choral conducting must 
demonstrate competence in German, French, 
and Italian diction and pronunciation. For any 
other student, research skills are specified by the 
advisory committee as appropriate to the major 
or secondary field of concentration. Undergrad- 
uate course credit earned in the completion of 
language or other research skills requirements is 
not applicable to the minimum number of hours 
necessary for the awarding of the degree. Infor- 
mation concerning methods of satisfying re- 
search skills requirements may be obtained from 
the Office of Graduate Studies, School of Music. 

6. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program of study. 

7. Advisory Committee. The graduate coordi- 
nator of the School of Music serves as program 
advisor and recommends an advisory committee 
to be appointed by the dean of the Graduate 
School during the student's first year of enroll- 
ment. The major professor, program advisor, and 
three faculty members representing the second 
field of concentration and the areas of music his 
tory/literature and music theory comprise th 
membership of the advisory committee. 

The advisory committee, in consultation with 
the student, is charged with planning the stu- 
dent's program of study, specifying research 
skills requirements, arranging for and adminis- 
tering the comprehensive examinations, approv- 
ing the topic for the document or dissertation, 



th 



approving and evaluating recital requirements, 
and approving the student's defense of his or her 
research. 

Recommendations for advisory committee 
membership, and replacements should vacancies 
occur, must meet with the approval of the Grad- 
uate Studies Committee and the School of Music 
and the dean of the Graduate School. 

8. Programs of Study. The program of study 
involves the completion of course work in five 
areas: major field; minor field; music history /lit- 
erature and theory; music in higher education; 
and research/special requirements. A prelimi- 
nary program of study is normally developed 
luring the first year of residence. The program 
must be approved by a majority of the advisory 
:ommittee. 

A final program of study will be submitted to 
he Graduate School prior to notification of the 
:omprehensive examination. The program of 
;tudy must be submitted on the proper form for 
approval by the advisory committee, the gradu- 
ate coordinator, and the dean of the Graduate 
School. The final program of study must show 
all graduate courses relevant to the doctoral pro- 
gram including courses from the master's de- 
cree, courses transferred from other universities, 
and those courses taken in residence stipulated 
as satisfying minimum degree requirements 
within the stated matriculation areas. A mini- 
mum of three hours of 9300, doctoral disserta- 
tion, must be included on the program of study. 

The department should evaluate carefully and 
Fully each doctoral student's progress and quali- 
fications at the end of the first year of study in 
order to advise the student whether or not to 
:ontinue in the program. 

9. Comprehensive Examinations. The com- 
prehensive examinations are designed to evalu- 
ate the student's ability to assimilate and 
integrate knowledge, apply historical and theo- 
retical concepts, demonstrate skills, and draw 
conclusions. The examinations, consisting of 
written and oral segments, may include a 
practicum. and are normally scheduled at or near 
the completion of course work. They cover doc- 
toral course work completed in meeting the re- 
quirements of each cognate area of study for the 
degree, graduate work completed at the master's 
level, and general musical knowledge acquired 
through independent study, research, and proles 
sional experience. The advisory committee 
prepares, administers, and evaluates the compre- 
hensive examinations. The major professor re- 
ports the outcome to the dean of the Graduate 
School. At least four out of a possible five affir- 



mative votes are required to pass both the writ- 
ten and oral examinations. Successful comple- 
tion of the written examination is a prerequisite 
for scheduling the oral comprehensive examina- 
tion. All members of the student's advisory com- 
mittee must be present for the entire oral 
examination. 

The oral comprehensive examination is open 
to all members of the faculty and shall be an- 
nounced by the Graduate School. The graduate 
coordinator notifies the Graduate School of the 
time and place of the oral examination at least 
two weeks prior to its administration. 

An examination of the student's dissertation 
prospectus may follow the oral comprehensive 
examination or be scheduled at a later date. The 
examination of the dissertation prospectus may 
not take the place of the oral comprehensive ex- 
amination. 

10. Dissertation/Document. A candidate 
electing music education as the major field of 
concentration must present a dissertation repre- 
senting originality of research, independent 
thinking, scholarly ability, and technical mastery 
of the chosen topic of study. A candidate of per- 
formance, choral conducting, or composition is 
required to present a written document which, in 
conjunction with required recitals, is submitted 
in fulfillment of dissertation requirements. The 
document is more limited in scope than the dis- 
sertation, though comparable in scholarship and 
its contribution to existing knowledge in the 
field. 

The dissertation or document must demon- 
strate originality and scholarship, the conclu- 
sions must be quantified, the literary form 
consistent with normal standards for scholarly 
writing, and the contribution to knowledge mer- 
iting publication. A candidate whose major field 
of concentration is composition or conducting 
may elect a dissertation with the consent of the 
advisory committee. When composition is the 
major field, the dissertation or document nor- 
mally will include one or more major original 
musical works. Scores as well as an accompany- 
ing analytical essay are required. 

11. Recitals. A minimum of three public 
recitals is required for a student whose major 
concentration is performance. A student with a 
concentration in composition is required to pre- 
sent two public recitals, lour recital perfor- 
mances are required of a student majoring with 
a concentration in choral conducting and litera- 
ture. Programs tor all recitals and performances 
must be approved two months in advance h\ the 
major professor and advisors, committee. When 



Graduate Si >u>,>l Professional Degn < i 73 



a lecture-recital is to be given, an outline of the 
lecture must accompany the program proposal. 

The first full recital must be presented prior to 
scheduling the written comprehensive examina- 
tion; the last recital may not be scheduled until 
the oral comprehensive examination has been 
satisfactorily completed and degree candidacy 
established. 

Recital projects presented in partial fulfill- 
ment of degree requirements will be evaluated 
by the full membership of the advisory commit- 
tee. The committee will notify the major profes- 
sor if the recital presentation is approved. 
Should the committee decline approval, the 
major professor and the dean of the Graduate 
School are so notified. The graduate coordinator 
of the School of Music, or an approved desig- 
nate, will be responsible for coordinating the 
evaluation of recital project presentations. 

12. Dissertation/Document Planning and Ap- 
proval. The student is responsible for the devel- 
opment of a proposal for the dissertation or 
document. The proposal is developed with guid- 
ance provided by the major professor or desig- 
nated chairman of the advisory committee. The 
advisory committee is to be consulted on a reg- 
ular basis during the period of proposal develop- 
ment. Approval of the prospectus requires the 
agreement of at least four of the five members of 
the advisory committee as evidenced by their 
signing an approval sheet attached to the final 
draft of the prospectus. This action signifies that 
members of the advisory committee believe that 
the prospectus proposes a satisfactory research 
study. A copy of the approved prospectus is filed 
with the graduate coordinator. 

13. Admission to Candidacy. The student is 
responsible for initiating an application for ad- 
mission to candidacy so that it is filed with the 
dean of the Graduate School at least two full se- 
mesters before the date of graduation. This ap- 
plication is a certification by the School of 
Music that the student has demonstrated ability 
to do acceptable graduate work in the major con- 
centration and that: 

( 1 ) all prerequisites set as a condition to ad- 
mission have been satisfactorily com- 
pleted; 

(2 research skills requirements have been 
met; 

(3) the final program of study has been ap- 
proved by the advisory committee, the 
graduate coordinator, and the dean of the 
Graduate School; 

(4) an average of 3.0 (B) has been main- 
tained on all graduate courses taken and 



on all completed graduate courses on the 
program of study (no course with a 
grade below C may be placed on the 
final program of study); 

(5) written and oral comprehensive exami- 
nations have been passed and reported to 
the Graduate School; 

(6) the advisory committee, including any 
necessary changes in the membership, is 
confirmed and all its members have 
been notified of their appointment; and 

(7) the residence requirement has been met. 
After admission to candidacy, a student must 

register at least two additional semesters and a 
total minimum of 10 hours of dissertation or re- 
search credit. The student must register for a 
minimum of three hours of credit in any semes- 
ter when using University facilities and/or staff 
time. 

Once a student has been admitted to candi- 
dacy, the department has an ethical responsibil- 
ity to ensure that appropriate faculty mentorship 
is provided to the candidate for completion of 
the degree. 

14. Dissertation Approval and Defense. When 
the major professor is satisfied with the com- 
pleted dissertation or document, he or she will 
certify that it has his or her approval and is ready 
to be read. The major professor will then distrib- 
ute copies of the manuscript to the remaining 
members of the advisory committee, schedule a 
final oral defense, and notify the dean of the 
Graduate School at least two full weeks prior to 
the defense. Subsequently, the Graduate School 
will announce the time and place of the defense 
of the dissertation or document to the University 
community. The committee members will have 
three weeks to read and evaluate the completed 
manuscript. 

Written assent of three of the four committee 
members (other than the major professor) will 
be required before a dissertation or document 
will be approved as ready for the final defense. 
If the advisory committee declines to approve 
the dissertation or document as ready for the 
final defense, the major professor will notify the 
student and the dean of the Graduate School. 

The defense of the dissertation or document 
will be chaired by the student's major professor 
and attended by all members of the advisory 
committee. Four of the five members of the ad- 
visory committee must approve the student's 
dissertation or document and defense and must 
certify their approval in writing. The results of 
the defense of the dissertation or document must 



74 / The University of Georgia 



be reported to the Graduate School at least one 
week prior to graduation. 

Once the dissertation has been approved by 
the advisory committee and the final oral exam- 
ination has been passed, the dissertation must be 
submitted to the Graduate School for final ap- 
proval no later than the last day of classes of the 
following semester. Dissertations which are not 
submitted by this deadline must be defended 
again and approved by the Advisory Committee 
before they will be considered by the Graduate 
School for final approval. 

15. Binding the Dissertation/Document. 
Three official copies of the dissertation or docu- 
ment must be filed in the University Library for 
binding. Each copy must carry a certificate of 
approval signed by the major professor and the 
dean of the Graduate School. 

16. Electronic Submission of Dissertation. 
The Graduate School now accepts the submis- 
sion of the dissertation in electronic format. The 
format procedures are the same as for that of the 
paper copy, however the submission process is 
different. Please contact the Graduate School for 
more details pertaining to electronic submission. 

17. Other Requirements. Before the degree 
will be awarded, the student must file a copy of 
the abstract of the dissertation or document (not 
more than 350 words) with the Graduate School 
and the library. At the same time, the student 
must submit a receipt showing that he or she has 
deposited with the treasurer of the University the 
amount of $55 to cover the cost of microfilming 
the dissertation or document. 

All requirements for the degree must be com- 
pleted and reported to the Graduate School no 
later than one week prior to graduation. A stu- 
dent must be registered for a minimum of three 
hours of credit the semester in which all degree 
requirements are completed. 

Doctor of Public 
Administration (DPA) 

The objective of the program is to provide doc- 
toral-level training for several client groups. 
First, the program will prepare students to serve 
| in executive or upper managerial levels in local, 
[state, and federal jurisdictions. Second, the pro 
[gram will prepare students for a variety o\' insti- 
tutional settings that have significant interfaces 
with public agencies. These include various in- 
stitutes, private planning agencies, and consult- 
ing organizations. Third, the program will help 



prepare individuals for specialized research and 
teaching careers. 

The department may implement this degree 
program by the adoption of appropriate rules 
and regulations. Departmental rules and regula- 
tions may not, however, conflict with the poli- 
cies, rules, and regulations of the Graduate 
School. 

Requirements 

1 . Admission. An applicant may be admitted 
as a prospective candidate for the Doctor of Pub- 
lic Administration degree upon certification by 
the major department that he or she is a person 
of proper attainment and promise. The depart- 
ment must certify that appropriate courses can 
be offered and required research adequately sup- 
ported and directed. Admission must be ap- 
proved by the dean of the Graduate School. 

2. Residence. The granting of this degree pre- 
supposes a minimum of three full years of study 
beyond the bachelor's degree. At least two con- 
secutive semesters of full-time work (i.e., en- 
rollment for a minimum of 20 hours of 
consecutive course work included on the pro- 
gram of study) must be spent in resident study 
on this campus. If the student holds an assistant- 
ship or has other part-time duties, the residence 
requirement will be increased to provide the 
equivalent of two consecutive semesters of full- 
time study. 

3. Time Limit. All requirements for the de- 
gree, except the dissertation and final oral exam- 
ination, must be completed within a period of 
six years. This time requirement dates from the 
first registration for graduate courses on the pro- 
gram of study. 

A candidate for the Doctor of Public Admin- 
istration degree who fails to complete all degree 
requirements within five years after passing the 
comprehensive examinations and being admit- 
ted to candidacy will be required to take the 
comprehensive examinations again and be ad- 
mitted to candidacy a second time. 

4. Grade Average. To be eligible for gradua- 
tion, a student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average 
on all graduate courses taken and on all courses 
on the program o\' study. 

5. Advisory Committee. Before the end of the 
first year Of residence o( a prospective candidate 
for the Doctor o\' Public Administration degree 

and upon the recommendation of the departmen- 
tal graduate coordinator, the dean of the Gradu- 
ate School shall appoint an advisor) committee 
tor the student. The committee will consist of a 



Graduate \< lun>i Professional />< <<< < \ 75 



major professor, as chairman, and four addi- 
tional members. The major professor and at least 
two of the other members of the committee must 
be appointed members of the graduate faculty. 
The committee will be recommended to the dean 
of the Graduate School by the graduate coordi- 
nator after consultation with the student and fac- 
ulty members involved. 

The advisory committee, in consultation with 
the student, is charged with planning the stu- 
dent's program of study. It is also charged with 
approving the program of study, arranging the 
comprehensive written and oral examinations, 
approving a subject for the dissertation, approv- 
ing the completed dissertation, and approving 
the student's defense of his or her research. The 
committee should advise the student of required 
research skills and other requirements. 

The department's recommendations for the 
advisory committee, and any replacements, shall 
be determined by procedures approved by a ma- 
jority of the graduate faculty of the department. 

6. Programs of Study. A preliminary program 
of study, developed by the major professor and 
the doctoral student and approved by a majority 
of the advisory committee, will be submitted to 
the graduate coordinator by the end of the stu- 
dent's first year of residence. The program of 
study should constitute a logical whole. 

A final program of study will be submitted to 
the Graduate School prior to notification of the 
comprehensive examination. This program of 
study must be submitted on the proper form for 
approval by the advisory committee, the gradu- 
ate coordinator, and the dean of the Graduate 
School. The final program of study must show 
all graduate courses relevant to the doctoral pro- 
gram (including courses from the master's de- 
gree and courses transferred from other 
universities), and not just courses satisfying the 
minimum degree requirement. A minimum of 
three hours of 9300, doctoral dissertation, must 
be included on the program of study. 

The department should evaluate carefully and 
fully each doctoral student's progress and quali- 
fications at the end of the first year of study in 
order to advise the student whether or not to 
continue in the program. 

7. Comprehensive Examinations. A student 
must pass formal, comprehensive written and 
oral examinations before being admitted to can- 
didacy for the degree. These examinations are 
administered by the student's advisory commit- 
tee. 

The written comprehensive examination, al- 
though administered by the advisory committee, 



may be prepared and graded according to the 
procedures and policies in effect in the student's 
department. The oral comprehensive examina- 
tion will be an inclusive examination within the 
student's fields of study. An examination of the 
student's dissertation prospectus may precede or 
follow the oral comprehensive examination but 
may not take the place of the oral comprehen- 
sive examination. All members of the student's 
advisory committee must be present for the en- 
tire period of both oral examinations. 

The oral comprehensive examination is open 
to all members of the faculty and shall be 
announced by the Graduate School. The gradu- 
ate coordinator must notify the Graduate 
School of the time and place of this examina- 
tion at least two weeks before the date of the 
examination. 

Following each examination, written and oral, 
each member of the advisory committee will 
cast a written vote of pass or fail on the exami- 
nation. At least four out of a possible five posi- 
tive votes are required to pass each examination. 
The results of both examinations will be re- 
ported to the Graduate School. 

8. Admission to Candidacy. The student is re- 
sponsible for initiating an application for admis- 
sion to candidacy so that it is filed with the dean 
of the Graduate School at least two full semes- 
ters before the date of graduation. This applica- 
tion is a certification by the student's major 
department that the student has demonstrated 
ability to do acceptable graduate work in the 
chosen field of study and that: 

(1) all prerequisites set as a condition to ad- 
mission have been satisfactorily com- 
pleted; 

(2) research skills requirements have been 
met; 

(3) the final program of study has been ap- 
proved by the advisory committee, the 
graduate coordinator, and the dean of the 
Graduate School; 

(4) an average of 3.0 (B) has been main- 
tained on all graduate courses taken and 
on all completed courses on the program 
of study (no course with a grade below 
may be placed on the final program of 
study); 

(5) written and oral comprehensive exami- 
nations have been passed and reported to 
the Graduate School; 

(6) the advisory committee, including any 
necessary changes in the membership, is 
confirmed and all its members have 
been notified of their appointments; and 



76 / The University of Georgia 



(7) the residence requirement has been met. 

After admission to candidacy, a student must 
register for at least two additional semesters and 
a total minimum of 10 hours of dissertation or 
other appropriate credit. A student must register 
for a minimum of three hours of credit in any se- 
mester when using University facilities and/or 
staff time. 

Once a student has been admitted to candi- 
dacy, the department has an ethical responsibil- 
ity to ensure that appropriate faculty mentorship 
is provided to the candidate for completion of 
the degree. 

9. Dissertation Planning. Students pursuing 
this degree must present a dissertation on some 
subject connected with their major field of study. 
The dissertation must represent originality in re- 
search, independent thinking, scholarly ability, 
and technical mastery of a field of study. The 
conclusions must be logical, the literary form 
acceptable, and the contribution to knowledge 
meriting publication. 

Persons who serve on the advisory committee 
at the time the dissertation research is under- 
taken must be faculty members knowledgeable 
in the areas of the student's research. They 
should be selected irrespective of their depart- 
mental affiliation. Usually membership of the 
advisory committee will remain unchanged dur- 
ing a student's entire doctoral program, while at 
other times changes in the original committee 
will be necessary. The major professor has the 
primary responsibility for guiding research, but 
the student should consult all members of the 
advisory committee to draw upon their expertise 
in relevant areas. 

The major professor and advisory committee 
shall guide the student in planning the disserta- 
tion. The student will prepare a dissertation 
prospectus. When the major professor certifies 
that the dissertation prospectus is satisfactory, it 
must be formally considered by the advisory 
committee in a meeting with the student. 

Approval of the dissertation prospectus signi- 
fies that members of the advisory committee be- 
lieve that it proposes a satisfactory research 
study. Approval of the prospectus requires the 
agreement of at least four of the five members of 
the advisory committee as evidenced by their 
signing an appropriate form, which, together 
with the approved prospectus, is filed with the 
graduate coordinator. 

10. Dissertation Approval and Defense. When 
the major professor is satisfied with the com- 
pleted dissertation, he or she will certify that it 
has his or her approval and is ready to be read 



The major professor will then distribute copies 
of the dissertation to the remaining members of 
the advisory committee, schedule a final oral de- 
fense, and notify the Graduate School at least 
two weeks prior to defense. Subsequently, the 
Graduate School will announce the time and 
place of the defense of the dissertation to the 
University community. The committee members 
will have three weeks to read and evaluate the 
completed dissertation. 

Written assent of three of the four committee 
members (other than the major professor) will 
be required before a dissertation will be ap- 
proved as ready for a final defense. If the advi- 
sory committee declines to approve the 
dissertation as ready for the final defense, the 
major professor will notify the student and the 
Graduate School. The defense of the dissertation 
will be chaired by the student's major professor 
and attended by all members of the advisory 
committee. Four of the five members of the ad- 
visory committee must approve the student's 
dissertation and defense and must certify their 
approval in writing. The results of the defense of 
the dissertation must be reported to the Graduate 
School at least one week prior to graduation. 

Once the dissertation has been approved by 
the advisory committee and the final oral exam- 
ination has been passed, the dissertation must be 
submitted to the Graduate School for final ap- 
proval no later than the last day of classes of the 
following semester. Dissertations which are not 
submitted by this deadline must be defended 
again and approved by the Advisory Committee 
before they will be considered by the Graduate 
School for final approval. 

1 1 . Binding the Dissertation. Three official 
copies of the dissertation must be filed in the 
University Library for binding. Each copy must 
carry a certificate of approval signed by the 
major professor and the dean of the Graduate 
School. 

12. Electronic Submission of Dissertation. 
The Graduate School now accepts the submis- 
sion of the dissertation in electronic format. The 
format procedures are the same as for that o( the 
paper copy, however the submission process is 
different Please contact the Graduate School for 

more details pertaining to electronic submission. 

13. Other Requirements. Before the degree 
will be awarded, the student must file a cop) of 

the abstract o\' the dissertation (not more than 
350 words) with the Graduate School and the li- 
brarj At the same time, the student must submit 
a receipt showing that he or she has deposited 
with the treasurer of the university the amount o\' 



Graduate St hoot Professional Degret i 77 



$55 to cover the cost of microfilming the disser- 
tation. 

All requirements for the degree must be com- 
pleted and reported to the Graduate School no 
later than one week prior to graduation. A stu- 
dent must enroll for at least three hours of credit 
in the semester in which graduation require- 
ments are completed. 

Certification of Professional 
Personnel 

The University of Georgia offers graduate pro- 
grams leading to professional personnel certifi- 
cation at the master s, specialist, and doctoral 
levels in some 40 different teaching, administra- 
tive, supervisory, and school service fields. 

The degrees Master of Education and Master 
of Arts (Education) include both teaching and 
professional courses for fifth-year certification. 
Students who complete a Master of Arts degree 
may meet certification requirements by taking 
professional courses in education. 

A 48 semester-hour program leading to Level 
5 certification is available for students holding a 
baccalaureate degree which meets the teaching 
field requirements at the Level 4 level in art ed- 
ucation, social science education, science educa- 
tion, and language education. The program 
allows two options, one leading to Level 4 certi- 
fication upon completion of Phase I courses and 
subsequently to Level 5 certification, and the 
other leading directly to Level 5 certification 
upon completion of the entire program. 

Specific course requirements for graduate cer- 
tification may be obtained by contacting the ap- 
propriate department within the College of 
Education. In addition to completing prescribed 
academic work, individuals applying for initial 
teacher certification must present passing scores 
on Praxis I academic skills test in reading, math- 
ematics, and writing. Individuals are exempt 
from this requirement if they have earned quali- 
fying scores on any of these tests: SAT total 
score 1000 (with at least 480V and 520M); GRE 
total score 1030 (with at least 490V and 540Q); 
or ACT total score 22 (with at least 21V and 
22M). An applicant must also earn satisfactory 
scores on the Praxis II (Subject Assessment) in 
the appropriate subject areas before an applica- 
tion can be submitted. Applications for evalua- 
tion, professional certificates, and Praxis I and II 
registration packets and study guides are avail- 
able from the Associate Dean's Office, G-10 
Aderhold Hall. 



Certificate Programs 

Conservation Ecology and 
Sustainable Development 

The University of Georgia offers a certificate ir 
conservation ecology and sustainable develop- 
ment through the Institute of Ecology. Students 
who earn this certificate will receive interdisci- 
plinary preparation to handle the unique, multi- 
disciplinary problems associated with working 
in the area of conservation and sustainable de- 
velopment. Students in the natural sciences will 
add a social science perspective to their under- 
standing of the ecology of development, and stu- 
dents in the social sciences will learn ecological 
principles so that their decisions can be 
grounded in biological fact. 

The graduate certificate program requires a 
student to complete at least 20 hours of credit. 
The program of study must include four core 
courses: ECOL 6080, Principles of Conserva- 
tion and Sustainable Development I (4 hrs.); 
ECOL 6140, Principles of Conservation and 
Sustainable Development II (3 hrs.); a seminar 
elective in conservation and sustainable devel- 
opment (2-3 hrs.); and ECOL 8400, Perspec- 
tives on Conservation Ecology and Sustainable 
Development (1 hr., repeated two times). The re- 
maining hours of credit (at least 10) will be 
made up by elective courses selected from a list 
of approved courses. One or more of these 
courses may jointly fulfill the requirements in 
the graduate degree program of their department 
or school. The graduate student and his/her ad- 
visor in the student's academic department plan 
the program of study to fulfill the requirements 
of the certificate program. 

Any graduate student in a natural science or a 
social science degree program at the University 
of Georgia is eligible to apply for admission to 
the certificate program. Application to the pro- 
gram should be made by filling out an applica- 
tion form available from the Ecology Graduate 
Program Office (Room 140, Ecology Building). 
Applications may be received and acted upon at 
any time. 

For more information about the program, con- 
tact the graduate coordinator in the Institute of 
Ecology, Ecology Building, (706) 542-3404. 

Environmental Ethics 

The University of Georgia has a Faculty of En- 
vironmental Ethics; a certificate program at the 
graduate level; and a variety of courses devoted 



78 / The University of (h'orxia 



partially or entirely to issues of values and the 
environment. 

The Certificate in Environmental Ethics. This 
certificate is awarded to graduate students meet- 
ing the following requirements: The completion 
of at least 1 8 hours of graduate work, including 
at least 14 hours of graduate course work in ap- 
proved courses along with an approved research 
paper in environmental ethics designated for at 
least three hours of graduate credit. All candi- 
dates are required to take the following courses: 
EETH/PHIL 6220, Environmental Ethics; 
EETH/ECOL 6200, Ecological Concepts; 
EETH/PHIL 6250, Technology and Values or 
EETH/JURI 7870, Environmental Dispute Res- 
olution; and EETH 6000, Environmental Ethics 
Seminar, as a common core. In addition, all can- 
didates are required to pass an oral exam. 

Other courses may be chosen by the student, 
with the approval of the graduate coordinator, 
from a list provided, according to his or her in- 
dividual interest and career objectives, with the 
provision that no more than nine hours of course 
work for credit toward the certificate may be ap- 
plied from any one academic field. Work on the 
certificate may be undertaken by any graduate 
student at the university. 

To be admitted to the certificate program, the 
student must be admitted to the University as a 
prospective candidate for a graduate degree, a 
professional degree, or as a nondegree candidate 
(see General Regulations of the Graduate School 
Bulletin), and then make application to the grad- 
uate coordinator of the Faculty of Environmen- 
tal Ethics. The nondegree candidate status 
applies to the person who already holds a mas- 
ter's or doctor's degree from an accredited insti- 
tution and who wishes to take graduate courses 
without becoming a candidate for a degree. All 
prospective recipients of the certificate should 
be admitted to a school or college of the Univer- 
sity and be assigned an advisor. The student and 
his or her advisor can then plan the program of 
study that will be a part of the student's applica- 
tion for acceptance into the environmental ethics 
program. The current graduate coordinator of 
the Faculty of Environmental Ethics is Dr. Peter 
G. Hartel, Department of Crop and Soil Sci- 
ences, (706) 542-0898. 

Geographic Information Science 
Certificate 

The University of Georgia otters a Graduate 
Certificate in Geographic Information Science. 
The field of geographic information science has 



grown rapidly with the development of powerful 
and versatile computing environments since the 
early 1980's. This field comprises all phases of 
processing spatially-referenced data, including 
data acquisition (remote sensing, global posi- 
tioning systems), data analysis (vector- and 
raster-based representational media, photogram- 
metry, spatial statistics), data interpretation, and 
data display (cartography). Since employment 
opportunities for people trained in geographic 
information science have proliferated, the Uni- 
versity of Georgia has developed this graduate 
certification program. The Geography Depart- 
ment offers coursework and related training in 
fundamental topics of geographic information 
science with other departments and organiza- 
tional units, such as Anthropology, the Institute 
of Ecology, School of Forestry, School of Envi- 
ronmental Design, and the College of Agricul- 
ture and Environmental Science, offering 
coursework and training in applications of geo- 
graphic information science. The curriculum 
structure is drawn primarily from Geography 
courses which are heavily enrolled with students 
from other units at UGA. The requirements were 
developed by an interdisciplinary committee. 

The Graduate Geographic Information Sci- 
ence Certificate Program is designed with three 
components: a set of prerequisite skills neces- 
sary to gain entry into the program, a set of 
courses required of all students enrolled in the 
program, and a set of elective courses that per- 
mit exploration of more advanced themes in ge- 
ographic information science. The prerequisite 
training, considered to be essential background 
for the certificate program, includes competence 
in elementary calculus, computer science, statis- 
tics, photo interpretation, and cartography. The 
three required courses include introductory GIS, 
an advanced GIS class focused on analysis, and 
a graduate level seminar in GIS. Elective 
courses include cartography, engineering sur- 
veying with the Global Positioning System 
(GPS), photogrammetry, remote sensing, and 
advanced remote sensing with GIS applications, 
with a formal requirement of at least one 8000- 
level seminar. A final requirement is the devel- 
opment of individual research projects or 
internships in geographic information science. 
Together the required and elective courses in the 
certificate program total 17 semester credits. 
Students are awarded the Graduate Certificate in 
Geographic Information Science upon comple- 
tion of all certificate requirements and comple- 
tion of a University of Georgia graduate degree. 



Graduate School Professional Degrees I 79 



Gerontology 

The University of Georgia has a strong commit- 
ment to gerontology training. Graduate training 
in gerontology is directed through the Gerontol- 
ogy Center located in Candler Hall. A graduate 
certificate in gerontology is awarded by the 
Gerontology Center. 

The Gerontology Center. The major purpose 
of the Gerontology Center is to coordinate and 
promote activities throughout the University re- 
lating to aging. The center's primary responsi- 
bilities are to coordinate graduate training and 
research and to promote faculty development in 
gerontology. There is a Faculty of Gerontology 
associated with the Gerontology Center from 21 
departments in 10 colleges and schools on cam- 
pus. Additionally, the center has a full-time di- 
rector, Dr. Leonard W. Poon, and Assistant 
Directors Dr. Philip A. Holtsberg and Dr. Everett 
Lee. The Faculty of Gerontology, chaired by Dr. 
Poon, oversees pre- and post-doctoral training, 
research and service in both basic and applied 
gerontological science. The center also serves as 
a liaison between the activities and resources of 
the University and federal, state, and local fund- 
ing agencies and interest groups. The Gerontol- 
ogy Center coordinates the Georgia Gerontology 
Consortium which is composed of four pro- 
grams: The Distance Learning Partnership in 
Gerontology, The Southern Regional Student 
Convention on Gerontology and Geriatrics, The 
Georgia Gerontology Consortium Seed Grant 
Program, and The Faculty Instruction, Research, 
and Outreach Development Program. The Cen- 
ter also regularly sponsors conferences and 
speakers on a broad range of topics at the na- 
tional, regional, and local level. 

Graduate Certificate in Gerontology. The 
Gerontology Center awards a Certificate in 
Gerontology to graduate students meeting cer- 
tain requirements. Students complete a total of 
1 8 semester hours of graduate level courses to 
meet the requirements of the Certificate Pro- 
gram. Twelve of these hours must be taken from 
four categories of required courses. Three hours 
must be fulfilled to meet a research/practicum 
requirement. The remaining three hours may be 
chosen from a list of approved electives. 

Required Course: GRNT 6000 - Seminar in 
Aging (three hours). All students are required to 
complete GRNT 6000 - Seminar in Aging. This 
course should be completed at the beginning of 
the program of study. The purpose of the semi- 
nar is to provide students with an overview of 
gerontology. The various content included in 



this seminar course should be helpful in decid- 
ing what Certificate courses are most relevant to 
a student's individualized plan of study. 

Other Required Courses: The Psychology, So- 
ciology, and Biology/Physiology of Aging (a 
total of nine hours). All students are required 
to complete at least one course on the biology/ 
physiology, sociology, and psychology of aging 
from a list of approved courses that can be pro- 
vided by the Assistant Director of the Gerontol- 
ogy Center. 

Research/Practicum. All students are required 
to complete three hours in a research or 
practicum experience. Students whose discipline 
is focused on research may submit a thesis or 
dissertation which they completed to fulfill mas- 
ter's or doctoral requirements within their aca- 
demic department or they may complete an 
individual research project for not less than three 
hours of credit. The thesis, dissertation, or re- 
search project must focus on some aspect of 
aging, and the project must be approved in writ- 
ing by the Gerontology Center's Director or As- 
sistant Director prior to development of the 
project in order to qualify for the Certificate. 

Students whose discipline has a practitioner's 
emphasis may complete an approved practicum 
in a gerontological setting for not less than three 
hours. The practicum experience must also be 
approved in writing by the Gerontology Center's 
Director or Assistant Director before beginning 
the practicum. 

Work on the certificate may be undertaken by 
any graduate student at the university. Courses 
that may be applied toward the certificate are 
found in the following academic units: adult ed- 
ucation; cellular biology; child and family de- 
velopment; exercise science; foods and 
nutrition; health promotion and behavior; hous- 
ing and consumer economics; law; pharmacy; 
psychology; recreation and leisure studies; so- 
cial work; and sociology. 

To be admitted to the certificate program, the 
student must be admitted to a department of the 
university at the graduate level either as a 
prospective candidate for a graduate degree or as 
a nondegree candidate and then make applica- 
tion to the Assistant Director of the Gerontology 
Center. The nondegree candidate status applies 
to a person who meets requirements for admis- 
sion to the Graduate School but who wishes to 
take graduate courses without becoming a can- 
didate for a degree. The prospective recipient of 
the certificate should be admitted to a depart- 
ment of the university and be assigned an advi- 
sor. The student and his/her advisor can then 



80 / The University of Georgia 



plan the program of study that will be a part of 
the student's application for acceptance into the 
gerontology certificate program. 

For further information concerning the 
Gerontology Center contact Dr. Leonard W. 
Poon (lpoon@geron.uga.edu), Chairman of the 
Faculty of Gerontology and Director of the 
Gerontology Center. For information about the 
certificate program or courses available for 
credit, contact Dr. Philip A. Holtsberg (pholts- 
berg@geron.uga.edu), Assistant Director of the 
Gerontology Center. Both individuals may be 
reached at The Gerontology Center, 100 Candler 
Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602- 
1775; phone (706) 542-3954; FAX: (706) 542- 
4805. 

Global Policy Studies 

The University of Georgia has a Center for the 
Study of Global Issues (GLOBIS) which offers 
a certificate in global policy studies at the grad- 
uate level. 

GLOBIS explores and develops interdiscipli- 
nary and interprofessional programs of instruc- 
tion, research, and service on a wide range of 
global issues. It administers undergraduate and 
graduate certificate programs in global policy 
studies; sponsors instructional and research-ori- 
ented symposia, seminars, lectures, and publica- 
tions; and serves as a focal point for those 
interested in foreign languages and international 
studies both inside and outside the university. 

The certificate program in global policy stud- 
ies is designed to provide students with an inter- 
national perspective as well as specialized, 
technical knowledge and skills. Graduate stu- 
dents earn the certificate as a supplement to a 
regular degree program. The certificate program 
blends well with disciplines which have tradi- 
tionally prepared individuals for international 
service, e.g., business, economics, foreign lan- 
guages, history, law, and political science. It is 
also designed for individuals in fields which 
have not traditionally offered international cur- 
ricula, such as accounting, agriculture, educa- 
tion, forestry, journalism, nutrition, and plant 
sciences. 

Most new students enrolled in a degree or 
professional program will find that they can sal 
isfy the certificate requirements with few. if any, 
additions to their regular program of study. 
Many departments offer courses which simulta- 
neously meet both certificate and degree re- 
quirements. Students applying to the university 
who are interested in the certificate program 



should contact GLOBIS for assistance in pro- 
cessing their application. 

The requirements for the certificate include 
24 semester hours of course work, including a 
nine-hour core sequence, a nine-hour substan- 
tive specialty, a six-hour skill requirement, an 
internship, and a paper requirement. Certificate 
students must take a minimum of 18 semester 
hours of this course work in residence at the 
University of Georgia. 

The core sequence consists of three courses: 
(1) a course with global scope in the discipline 
in which the individual plans to develop his or 
her substantive specialty; (2) a relevant course in 
a foreign area or region, such as Africa, Asia, 
Europe, Latin America, or the Middle East (stu- 
dents who are doing their substantive specialty 
in a foreign area or region should take this 
course in a cognate discipline instead); and (3) 
GPST 6000 or the equivalent. This course will 
cover the planning, implementation, and evalua- 
tion of policies designed to deal with global 
problems, especially development. 

The substantive specialty is composed of 
three courses that constitute a coherent area of 
concentration relevant to global policy studies. 
Many of these substantive specialties are identi- 
fied by discipline, issue, or region, such as eco- 
nomics, development, or African affairs. 

The professional skill requirement refers to 
competence in a foreign language or other rele- 
vant research or policy skill. Six hours in a for- 
eign language beyond the 2001 level at the 
University of Georgia or the equivalent as deter- 
mined by standardized proficiency tests is re- 
quired. 

The internship requirement consists of practi- 
cal work experience in a student's chosen area. 
This requirement may be satisfied by an actual 
internship course or an equivalent field experi- 
ence. There is also a requirement for a substan- 
tial paper on a global subject. This paper ma) be 
a master's thesis, a doctoral dissertation, or a 
paper suitable for presentation at a professional 
meeting. 

Finally, certificate students must have at least 
one of these courses m a second or cognate dis- 
cipline in addition to the interdisciplinary course 
in global policy anal\sis 

For further information concerning the certifi- 
cate program, write Dr. Markus M I . Crepa/. 
Coordinator. The Center for the Studs of Global 

Issues. The University of Georgia, 1 13 Franklin 

House. Athens. GA 30602-4240, or call (706) 
542-2947, or e-mail mcrepazG aiches.uga.edu. 



Graduate School Professional Degrees I 81 



Historic Preservation Studies 

With the passage of the National Historic Preser- 
vation Act of 1966, Congress declared historic 
preservation a part of national policy and autho- 
rized various programs to assist in the identifi- 
cation and perpetuation of those cultural 
resources which represent our national patri- 
mony. Over the past 30 years much progress has 
been made in the documentation and preserva- 
tion of our heritage. This progress has stimulated 
increased interest in the cultural environment as 
well as a desire, among many, to achieve a 
greater understanding of which elements consti- 
tute our heritage and how they may be protected 
for future generations. 

Objectives of the Program: 

(a) To develop within students an awareness 
of the contributions which historic re- 
sources make to the quality of environ- 
ments and to the quality of life available 
to the general populace. 

(b) To foster an understanding of historic 
preservation needs, problems, and op- 
portunities and the role which individual 
citizens can play in the protection and 
perpetuation of historic resources. 

(c) To prepare students, as citizens within 
their respective communities, to serve as 
volunteer members of citizen preserva- 
tion organizations and/ or government 
commissions and to provide informed 
leadership to these and any other com- 
munity preservation efforts. 

(d) To provide students an opportunity to 
study historic preservation as a part of 
their academic program or as a supple- 
mental educational opportunity avail- 
able to graduates. 

Curriculum: The certificate program requires 
a student to complete 18 hours of credit. These 
must include the nine hours of certificate core 
requirements with the remaining nine hours to 
be selected from the historic preservation cur- 
riculum. Three hours of the certificate require- 
ments may be satisfied by a preservation-related 
thesis in the student's academic department. The 
proposal for these theses must be jointly ap- 
proved by the graduate coordinator, or major 
professor, of the student's degree program and 
the Director of Graduate Studies in Historic 
Preservation. 

For additional information contact John C. 
Waters, Director of Graduate Studies in Historic 
Preservation, (706) 542-4706. 



Marriage and Family Therapy 

The Pre-Professional Graduate Certificate Pro- 
gram in Marriage and Family Therapy is de- 
signed to provide an interdisciplinary program 
for graduate students interested in the applied 
field of marriage and family therapy. The certifi- 
cate program involves three units of the Univer- 
sity of Georgia: the College of Education, the 
College of Family and Consumer Sciences, and 
the School of Social Work. Completion of the 
requirements for the certificate program will 
provide a strong academic basis preparing the 
student to undertake further supervised clinical 
training in marriage and family therapy. The cer- 
tificate program is not intended to provide all the 
training necessary to function as an independent 
professional nor to meet all the requirements for 
(a) state licensure as a marriage and family ther- 
apist or (b) clinical membership in the American 
Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. 
Graduate courses that may be used to fulfill re- 
quirements for the certificate program are of- 
fered in several units of the University of 
Georgia including the Department of Child and 
Family Development, the Department of Coun- 
seling and Human Development, and the School 
of Social Work. 

Any graduate student in the previously men- 
tioned or related programs at the University is 
eligible to apply for admission to the certificate 
program. 

To be admitted to the Certificate Program in 
Marriage and Family Therapy, the student must 
be admitted to the department of the university 
at the graduate level and then make an applica- 
tion to the Coordinator of the Faculty of Mar- 
riage and Family Therapy Certificate Program. 
The graduate student and his/her advisor in the 
student's academic department plan the program 
of study to fulfill the requirements of the certifi- 
cate program. With appropriate approval, 
courses in the certificate program may also 
apply to the degree program in the student's aca- 
demic department. For master's degree students, 
the certificate will be awarded upon completion 
of the certificate requirements and completion of 
the master's degree program in which the stu- 
dent in enrolled. For students already holding a 
master's degree, the certificate will be awarded 
at the end of the semester in which the certificate 
requirements are satisfied. 

For further information concerning the certifi- 
cate program, contact the Coordinator, MFT 
Certificate Program, School of Social Work, 
University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7016. 



82 / The University of Georgia 



Women's Studies 

The Women's Studies Program offers a 15-hour 
graduate certificate in women's studies. The cer- 
tificate is available to those students who are 
pursuing a graduate degree in any of the univer- 
sity's schools or colleges or to those who already 
hold a graduate degree. The purpose of the cer- 
tificate is to expose students to the rapidly ex- 
panding interdisciplinary scholarship on women 
which might otherwise be neglected in their tra- 
ditional curricula. 

All certificate candidates are required to take 
the two following courses: WMST 6010, Intro- 
duction to Feminist Theories, 3 hours, and 
WMST 7010, Women and the Construction of 
Knowledge, 3 hours (prerequisite: WMST 
6010). A student who has done extensive under- 
graduate or graduate course work in feminist 
theory may waive WMST 6010, without credit, 
and substitute another approved course by peti- 
tioning the program. The nine remaining hours 
may be drawn from the WMST courses listed 
below, or from courses in other cooperating de- 
partments which have been approved by the pro- 
gram: 

WMST 6 1 20 Biology and Politics of 
Women's Reproduction. 
3 hours. 
WMST 6130 Border Women: Gender 

Identify and Post-Colonial- 
ism. 3 hours. 
WMST 6250 Special Topics in Women's 

Studies. 3 hours. 
WMST 7050 The Political Economy of 
Gender in Third World 
Societies. 3 hours. 
WMST 7060 Black Women's Narratives. 

3 hours. 
WMST 7070 Feminist Ethnography. 

3 hours. 
WMST 7 1 00 Lesbian and Gay Studies. 

3 hours. 
WMST 7950 Directed Research in 

Women's Studies. 1-3 hours. 
WMST 8020 Seminar in Advanced 

Feminist Theory. 1-3 hours. 

For a complete listing of certificate courses in 
women's studies and for an application to the 
certificate program, contact Dr. Patricia Del 
Rey, Director of Women's Studies or Heather 
Kleiner, Associate Director. 12(X) S. Lumpkin 
Street, Athens, GA 30602-33647, (706) 542- 
2846. 



Graduate School Professional P< jn - i S3 



COURSE LISTINGS 




The College of Agricultural and 
Environmental Sciences 



Gale A. Buchanan, Dean 
(Conner Hall) 

The research and academic programs in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences focus 
on training students to meet the needs of agriculture and environmental protection on a regional, na- 
tional, and international level. The departments within the College offer graduate degrees at the mas- 
ters and doctorate levels in a variety of fields; additional professional degrees are offered by some 
departments. These graduate degree programs offer considerable flexibility to meet individual stu- 
dents' interests and backgrounds, so that students can prepare for careers in industry, government, or 
academia. General information regarding degree programs is available from the College of Agricul- 
tural and Environmental Sciences. Details about specific admission or program requirements and op- 
tions should be discussed with the appropriate department or graduate coordinator listed in this 
Bulletin. 



Agricultural and 
Applied Economics 



Fred C. White, Head 

Jack E. Houston, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0755 
(Conner Hall) 

Graduate study is offered at both the masters and 
doctoral levels. The Master of Science (MS) in 
agricultural economics and the Master of Sci- 
ence (MS) in environmental economics degrees 
require 27 hours minimum of course work and 
three hours of thesis. A Master of Agricultural 
Economics (MAE) degree consists of a mini- 
mum of 36 hours of course work including a 
technical report in lieu of a formal thesis. The 
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree consists of a 
minimum of 63 hours of course work beyond the 
bachelor's degree, satisfactory performance on 
written and oral examinations, and a formal dis- 
sertation. 

Graduate instruction and research may be un- 
dertaken in the following areas of specialization: 
agricultural marketing and consumer demand, 
agricultural business management, production 
economics, natural resources and environmental 
economics, and international trade and develop- 
ment. 

Graduate research is coordinated with the de- 
partment's overall research program. Students 
may select a research topic related to the depart- 

86 / The University of Georgia 



ment's current research projects or an approved 
area of sponsored research. Exceptional com- 
puter facilities, software, and support are avail- 
able for departmental research. 

Financial assistance is available to graduate 
students on a competitive basis in the form of 
departmental research assistantships. Paid in- 
ternships are also available from regional and 
national agribusiness firms. 

AAEC 4210/6210. Production Economics: Theory 
with Applications. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: AAEC 3580-3580L. 
Fundamental economic principles in determining effi- 
cient adjustments in agricultural resource use consis- 
tent with economic growth, and changing technology 
and economic conditions. 

AAEC 4510/6510. Farm Appraisal. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: AAEC 2580 or ECON 

2106. 

The models of appraisal to farm property, including 

factors influencing farm land and building values, 

such as land use, soils, crops, livestock, and buildings. 

AAEC 4710/6710. Rural Economic Development 
and Growth. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: AAEC 2580 or ECON 
2106. 

Inputs and outputs between agriculture and agricul- 
tural businesses; analysis of factors.affecting develop- 
ment and economic growth in developing areas. 

AAEC 4800/6800-4800L/6800L. Water Resource 

Economics. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 1 hour lab per 

week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: AAEC 2580 or ECON 

2106. 

The economic aspects of the use, supply, development, 

and management of water resources with special em 






phasis on river basin and project planning, benefit-cost 
analyses, water demands, and multiple use manage- 
ment of water resources. 

AAEC(FINA) 4870/6870. Futures and Option Mar- 
kets. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: AAEC 2580 or ECON 
2106. 

Development, functions, and importance of futures 
and option markets. Futures and option contracts; is- 
sues such as speculation, the roles of commission 
houses, commodity exchanges, and clearinghouses; 
and the use of future contracts as instruments for fi- 
nancing business activities. Technical and fundamen- 
tal trading theories. 

AAEC 4930/6930. Environmental Law and Gov- 
ernmental Regulation. 3 hours. 
Not open to students with credit in AAEC(EHSC) 
4250. 

Regulatory theory, externalities and market failures, 
definition of key regulations affecting agribusiness, 
overview of local government law, and delineation of 
environmental laws relating to agriculture. Current en- 
vironmental issues are related to statutory, administra- 
tive, and regulatory authorities. 

AAEC 4980/6980. Agribusiness Management. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (AAEC 2110 or ACCT 
2101) and (AAEC 3040 or AAEC 3100). 
The basic skills needed to be an effective manager of 
an agribusiness; applying and integrating these skills 
into a workable approach to management; provides a 
step-by-step approach to the application of basic prac- 
tical management skills in marketing, demand analy- 
sis, forecasting, finance, plant operations, and 
personnel. 

AAEC 6580-6580L. Microeconomics: Theory with 

Applications. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 

per week. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 3580 -3580L or permission of 

major. 

Partial and general equilibrium analyses in the study of 

efficient resource allocation among households and 

firms. Perfect and imperfect output and input markets 

are investigated in terms of economic efficiency. 

AAEC 6610. Quantitative Techniques in Agricul- 
tural Economics. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: STAT 4210 or STAT 6210 or permission 
of major. 

Basic quantitative techniques in agricultural economic 
theory, emphasizing basic models used in the study of 
prices, marketing, and production. 

AAEC 6630. Decision Theory for Resource Alloca- 
tion. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L. 
Application of decision .theory to natural and eco- 
nomic resources. Linear, nonlinear, and dynamic pro- 
gramming techniques for problems in economic and 
natural resource allocation. 



Agricultural and Applied Economics 



AAEC 6760. Intermediate Agricultural Prices. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L and AAEC 6610. 
Price theory and statistical techniques that allow the 
student to advance beyond the introductory level of 
analyzing agricultural prices. 

AAEC 6960. International Agricultural Trade. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L. 

Trade theory and an analysis of agricultural policies 

among nations. 

AAEC 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

AAEC 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

AAEC 7600. Environmental Economics and Policy 
Analysis. 3 hours. 

Environmental policy in both mathematical and intu- 
itive economics, including externalities, policy instru- 
ments, and implementation. Concepts are applied to 
United States environmental policy toward air and 
water pollution, hazardous substances, and implemen- 
tation of env ironmental law. 

(AAEC)FORS 7860. Resource Economics and 
Management 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L or ECON 8000. 
Economic and physical concepts of scarcity, the im- 
pact of market and social factors on resource use, and 
the optimal management of renewable and nonrenew- 
able resources. 

AAEC 8000. Special Readings in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Literature, the concepts and analytical tools for pro- 
duction economics, marketing, or resource economics. 

AAEC 8010. Seminar in Agricultural and Applied 
Economics. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 65 80-65 80L. 
Agricultural policy, production, marketing, develop- 
ment, trade, agribusiness management or natural re- 
sources Theoretical and methodological issues, 
empirical analyses, and firm/industrv /academic policy 
and other research issues 

AAEC 8020. Topics in Ayricultural and \pplied 
Economics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable tor maximum 9 

hours credit 

Prereq uis ite: Permission of department 
Agricultural policy, production, marketing, develop- 
ment, trade, agribusiness management or natural rc- 



Gradualt- Si hooi I >■ 87 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



sources. Theoretical and methodological issues, em- 
pirical analyses, firm/industry policy, and other issues. 

AAEC 8080. Production Economics: Theory and 
Application. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L and AAEC 6610. 
Economic theory of production, duality, applications, 
and modeling. 

AAEC 8100. Applied Resource Policy and Project 
Analysis. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L. 
Economic analysis of contemporary rural natural re- 
sources, environmental policies, and agricultural poli- 
cies and projects. Application of theory and techniques 
to local, state, and national problems and issues, par- 
ticularly those affecting rural areas. 

(AAEC)EHSC 8120. Roles and Responsibilities of 
Environmental Policy Makers. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Roles of science, engineering, law, journalism, eco- 
nomics, grass roots activism, and the legislative and 
regulatory process in the development of environmen- 
tal policy. 

AAEC 8140. Consumer Demand Theory. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L and (STAT 4220 or 

STAT 6220). 

Theoretical treatment of consumer demand. Utility 

theory and its assumptions, consumer behavior theory, 

and problems of application in agricultural and applied 

economics. 

AAEC 8210. Agricultural Programs and Policy. 

3 hours. 

Alternative governmental programs and policies as 
they relate to the solution of specific agricultural prob- 
lems. 

AAEC 8300. Agricultural Economics Research. 

2 hours. 

Methodology, techniques, and guidance for individual 

research in problems of agricultural economics. 

AAEC 8400. Agricultural Market Structure and 
Analysis. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L. 
The market in economic development and evaluation 
of structure, conduct, and performance in the United 
States agribusiness sector. Problems of market coordi- 
nation and associated policy issues. 

(AAEC)ECOL 8700. Environmental Policy and 
Management. 3 hours. 

Evolution, form, and substance of United States fed- 
eral policies and programs that address ecological 
problems, focusing on the nature of problems and al- 
ternatives for effective resolution. 

AAEC 8710. Advanced Agricultural Development 
and Crowth. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L or ECON 8010. 
Major economic problems of the agricultural sector of 
developing countries and a study of policy instruments 
which have been used to resolve these problems. 



AAEC 8750. Natural Resource and Environmental 
Economics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L. 
Management of natural and environmental resources. 
Major theoretical concepts will provide a basis for ex- 
amination of efficient production and consumption al- 
location decisions related to natural resources. 
Emphasis will center on economic, institutional, and 
legal aspects which prevent private markets from effi- 
ciently valuing resources. 

AAEC 8760. Topics in Natural Resource and Envi- 
ronmental Economics. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L. 
Classical and contemporary topics in natural resource 
and environmental economics following a seminar/ 
discussion format. 

AAEC 8800. Dynamic Optimization in Agricul- 
tural and Resource Economics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: AAEC 6580-6580L and ECON 8000 and 
ECON 81 10. 

Dynamic optimization and optimal control techniques 
relevant to agricultural and resource economics. Cal- 
culus of variations, the maximum principle, dynamic 
programming, and both open-loop and closed-loop op- 
timal control. 

AAEC 8850. Risk and Uncertainty in Agricultural 
Decision Making. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ECON 8020. 

Applications of microeconomic theory to measure and 
assess the impact of risk on firm, consumer, and mar- 
ket decisions and welfare. Evaluation of main sources 
of risk, including price, production, and technological 
uncertainty. Identification of firm responses to risk in 
financing, marketing, insurance, and contractual 
arrangements. 

AAEC 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

AAEC 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 19 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 






88 / The University of Georgia 



Agricultural 
Extension 



F. Richard Rohs, Program Head and Graduate 

Coordinator, 542-8935 
(109 Four Towers) 

The purpose of the graduate program in agricul- 
tural extension is to provide an opportunity for 
Cooperative Extension Service personnel and 
others to broaden and strengthen their base of 
technical knowledge and add the dimension of 
human and social relations that is essential if one 
is to perform effectively the duties of a general 
adult/youth educator within the context of the 
public service function of the University. 

The curriculum leading to the Master of Agri- 
cultural Extension (MAEXT) degree focuses on 
understanding the Cooperative Extension Ser- 
vice and how it works. Individual programs are 
built around the candidate's need for additional 
training in appropriate subject matter, human re- 
lations, communications, management, Cooper- 
ative Extension Service organization and 
methods, and informal teaching-learning. 

Opportunities for study and research are of- 
fered in the Department of Agricultural Leader- 
ship, Education and Communication, College of 
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, other 
departments and divisions in the College of 
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Col- 
lege of Family and Consumer Sciences, School 
of Forest Resources, other schools and colleges 
in the University and in the Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service. 

Agricultural Extension 

AEXT 7020. Program Evaluation. 3 hours. 
Identifying and selecting evaluation models, planning 
an evaluation, collecting and analyzing evaluation data 
using various qualitative and quantitative methods re 
lating evaluation to program change for agricultural 
and extension educational programs. 

AEXT 7050. Communication for Agricultural and 
Extension Educators. 3 hours 
Not open to students with credit in AGRI 5050. 
Basic communication processes m diverse profes- 
sional settings: personal interaction, small group, or- 
ganizational, media. 



Agricultural Extension 



AEXT 7080. Agricultural and Extension Adminis- 
tration. 3 hours. 

Administration and management of agricultural and 
extension educational programs and people. Four 
major domains of managerial activity; administrative, 
communications, supervision, and cognitive areas. 

AEXT 7210. Problem Analysis in Agricultural Ex- 
tension Work. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 
hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A topic or problem in Cooperative Extension signifi- 
cant to the candidate's area of work. 



Agricultural Leadership 

ALDR 7000. Master's Research. 1-12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Not open to students with credit in AEXT 7000. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ALDR 7040. Programming for Agricultural Youth 
Groups. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in AEXT 7040. 
History, philosophy, and organizational structure of 
Agricultural Youth Education; emphasis upon the 
needs of youth, teaching, program planning and eval- 
uation methods, the management of volunteer leaders, 
volunteer leader development, and program and finan- 
cial resources necessary for youth work. 

ALDR 7070. Program Development for Agricul- 
tural Leaders. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in AEXT 7070. 
Basic problems, principles, and procedures involved 
in developing programs by leaders in agricultural or- 
ganizations. Topics include needs assessment and citi- 
zen involvement techniques, instructional and 
evaluation elements. 

ALDR 7100. Directed Study in Agricultural Lead- 
ership. 3 hours. 3 hours lab per week 
Not open to students with credit in AEXT 7100. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Students gain experience in leadership roles in agri- 
cultural organizations, businesses, and/or institutions 
by working with current leaders in a learning labora- 
tory situation. 

ALDR 7110. Special Problems in Agricultural 
Leadership. 3 hours 

Not open to students with credit in \l \ I 7110. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Specialized problems and (raining appropriate to the 
needs ot the individual associated with agricultural or- 
ganizations. Businesses and institutions will he studied 
to develop greater tacilitv in the application of specific 
agricultural subject matter and leadership techniques. 



f.rr>A,..*l.< C,-/,,,,./ ;),.„r,nf„„, ,,t I ". „, 



KQ 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



Agriculture 



(AGRI)EETH 4190/6190. Agricultural Ethnics. 

1 hour. 1 lab period of 2 hours each per week. 
Ethical issues in agriculture. Topics include animal 
rights/animal welfare, agriculture as a business/agri- 
culture as a way of life, sustainable agriculture, 
(bio)technology, migrant farm workers, foreign aid, 
world hunger, and related topics. 



Animal and Dairy 
Science 



Larry L. Benyshek, Head 

Scott A. Martin, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0953 
(Animal & Dairy Science Complex) 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in animal and 
dairy science is offered with the opportunity to 
specialize in animal breeding, nutrition, physiol- 
ogy of reproduction, meats and muscle biology, 
and animal production. The program leading to 
the PhD degree in animal nutrition is also avail- 
able to animal and dairy science students. 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of 
Science degree in either animal science or dairy 
science are offered in all general areas of animal 
and dairy science. These programs are flexible 
enough to interest students who may want to 
consider the MS degree as a terminal degree and 
are also designed to accommodate those gradu- 
ates who want to use the MS degree as a 
preparatory step toward the PhD degree. 
Courses in the department and appropriate 
courses in poultry science, biochemistry, statis- 
tics, microbiology, veterinary physiology, and 
other departments provide in-depth training and 
laboratory experience. Amino acid analyzers, 
gas-liquid chromatographs, a flame spectropho- 
tometer, a gas flow Gieger tube detector, a whole 
body counter, an atomic absorption spectropho- 
tometer, a sonoscope, a high pressure liquid 
chromatograph, liquid scintillation counters, 
gamma counters, ultracentrifuge, enzyme ki- 
netic spectrophotometer, scanning and transmis- 
sion electron microscopes, electrophoresis 
equipment, tissue culture incubators and other 
equipment are available for use in teaching and 
research. Research facilities include laboratories 

90 / The University of Georgia 



equipped to handle radioisotopes and many 
chemical and biological analyses, small and 
large animal metabolism rooms and equipment, 
large animal surgery laboratory, and research fa- 
cilities on swine, horse, beef cattle, and dairy 
cattle farms located near the campus and in the 
state. Service of the University Computer Center 
is available for data processing. 

Prospective students who desire financial aid 
may apply for assistance directly to the animal 
and dairy science department. A limited number 
of teaching and research assistantships for train- 
ing students in both research and teaching and 
assistance to the faculty are available. Other as- 
sistantships are available through the Graduate 
School and application for these should be made 
directly to the graduate coordinator. Additional 
courses related to animal nutrition are listed 
under animal nutrition. 

ADSC 4100/6100. Advanced Genetics of Livestock 
Improvement. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ADSC 3110 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The development of practical and genetically sound pro- 
grams involving the study and application of genetic 
principles underlying selection, systems of mating, and 
performance testing. Major emphasis will be on charac- 
ters of economic importance in meat animals. 

(ADSC)FDST 4140/6140-4140L/6140L. Advanced 
Meat Science. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: FDST(MIBO) 4030/6030- 
4030L/6030L and FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L. 
Meat processing and technology, scientific basis for 
meat as a food, USDA and FDA regulations governing 
meat processing, and the latest innovations in com- 
mercial meat processing. 

ADSC 4150/6150. Microbial Ecology of the Rumen. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB 4020/6020 or 
MIBO 4090/6090 or permission of department. 
The rumen microbial ecosystem that will examine the 
biochemistry, ecology, nutrition, physiology, and tax- 
onomy of rumen microorganisms. The symbiotic rela- 
tionship between rumen microorganisms and the 
nutrition of the ruminant animal. Manipulation of 
rumen fermentation to maximize host-animal produc- 
tion. 

(ADSC)ANNU 4360/6360. Ruminant Nutrition. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ADSC 3300-3300L and 
BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 

Digestive physiology and metabolism of the rumen. 
Treats systematically the diversity of function, 
complex symbiotic relationships of the rumen mi 
croflora/microfauna, and the physiology and metabo- 
lism of the rumen as related to digestion, absorption, 
and utilization of nutrients. 



: 



(ADSC)ANNU(POUL) 4370/6370. Monogastric 

Nutrition. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [ADSC 3300-3300L or 

POUL 3750] and BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 

Comparative nutrition of monogastric animals, with 

special but not exclusive, consideration of poultry and 

swine. 

ADSC 4400/6400-4400L/6400L. Applied Reproduc- 
tion in the Horse. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ADSC 3400-3400L. 
Management of reproduction in the horse for efficient 
production. Application of reproductive management 
systems. 

ADSC 4410/6410-4410L/6410L. Applied Reproduc- 
tive Management in Cattle and Swine. 3 hours. 2 
hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ADSC 3400-3400L. 
Management of reproduction in farm animals for effi- 
cient livestock production. Application of reproductive 
management, principles associated with artificial in- 
semination, embryo transfer, pregnancy detection, 
semen collection, and reproductive record manage- 
ment. 

ADSC 6110-6110L. Experimental Methods in Ani- 
mal Biotechnology. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 
hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or MIBO 
3500 or permission of department. 
Laboratory methods in molecular biology stressing re- 
combinant DNA techniques. Experiments will include 
recombination, cloning, restriction analysis tech- 
niques, and optional experiments chosen by students. 

ADSC(FDST) 6170-6170L. Experimental Tech- 
niques in Meat Science and Muscle Biology. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or STAT 
4220 or STAT 6220 or permission of department. 
Basic methods in laboratory techniques in meat sci- 
ence. Experiments will familiarize students from a 
■ride variety of backgrounds with a number of labora- 
tory techniques, including lipogenesis. muscle histol- 
ogy, enzyme kinetics, and muscle metabolism. 

Al)SC(Fl)ST) 6890. Advanced Meat Science. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or permis- 
sion of department 

The theories and methods used m meat science in 
determination of tissue growth: compositional tech- 
niques: muscle protein and lipid organization, struc- 
ture, ami function; biochemical conversion of muscle 
to meat, and its impact on meat quality and palatabil- 
it\ in meal animals. 

ADSC 7000. Master's Research. I- 1 ) hours. Repeat 
able tor maximum IS hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Research while enrolled tor a master's degree under 

the direction of faculty members. 



Agriculture • Animal and Dairy Science 



ADSC 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ADSC 8090. Introduction to Quantitative Genetics 
of Livestock Improvement. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: ADSC 3110 and (STAT 4220 or STAT 
6220). 

The population genetic theory associated with live- 
stock populations and their quantitative genetic im- 
provement. 

ADSC 8100. Statistical Methods in Animal and 
Dairy Science. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [(STAT 4220 or STAT 6220) and ADSC 
81 10] or permission of department. 
Experimental designs and statistical procedures partic- 
ularly applicable to animal research with emphasis on 
multiple regression and least squares analysis. 

ADSC 8110. Advanced Quantitative Genetics of 
Livestock Improvement. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: STAT 4220 or STAT 6220. 
Advanced study of population and quantitative genet- 
ics. 

ADSC 8200. Computational Techniques in Animal 

Breeding. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ADSC 8100 or permission of department. 

Computing algorithms useful for analysis of very large 

data sets in animal breeding. Class involves several 

programming projects and case studies on field data 

sets. 

ADSC 8210. Advanced Statistical Methods in Ani- 
mal Breeding. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ADSC 8200 or permission of department. 
Latest statistical and computing procedures useful in 
animal breeding. Includes nonlinear models. Bayesian 
methods, and methods useful for analysis oi molecular 
marker information. 

ADSC 8400. Advanced Animal Reproduction. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ADSC 3400-3400L. 
Physiological mechanisms associated with reproduc- 
tion in farm animals, including the reproductive en- 
docrine system, the mechanism of hormone action and 
hormone measurement, and follicular development 
through parturition. 

ADSC H700. Special Problems in Animal and Dair> 

Science 1. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

library and laboratory problems dealing with different 

phases o\ livestock production 

\I)S( 8710. Special Problem! in tnimal and Daftrj 
Science II. J hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Library and laboratory problems dealing with different 

phases o\' livestock production 



Graduate School Description of ( '*! 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



ADSC 8800. Graduate Seminar. 1 hour. Repeatable 

for maximum 4 hours credit. 1 hour lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Weekly meetings devoted to discussion of research 

problems. 

ADSC 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ADSC 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Animal Nutrition 



Gene M. Pesti, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-1347 
(Livestock-Poultry Building) 

This program is interdepartmental, including the 
Departments of Animal and Dairy Science, and 
Poultry Science. It embraces both the basic and 
applied phases of nutrition including the metabo- 
lism, biochemistry, and physiology of minerals, 
lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, etc., in 
monogastric and ruminant animals. Strong collat- 
eral support, through course offerings and re- 
search cooperation, also is available in the areas of 
biochemistry, physiology, genetics, statistics, vet- 
erinary medicine, and microbiology. Facilities for 
research include adequately equipped nutritional, 
biochemical, and physiological laboratories, ex- 
perimental animal quarters for many farm and lab- 
oratory species and instrumentation for many 
types of metabolic studies including, for example, 
the use of isotopes. The goal is to provide a chal- 
lenging program, supplying opportunity for stu- 
dents to develop their creative ability to the point 
where their knowledge and motivation will enable 
them to make major contributions and assume 
leadership in the nutrition profession. 

ANNU(ADSC) 4360/6360. Ruminant Nutrition. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ADSC 3300-3300L and BCMB(BIOL) 
(CHEM)3100. 

Digestive physiology and metabolism of the rumen. 
Treats systematically the diversity of function, 
complex symbiotic relationships of the rumen mi- 
croflora/microfauna, and the physiology and metabo- 
lism of the rumen as related to digestion, absorption, 
and utilization of nutrients. 



ANNU(ADSC)(POUL) 4370/6370. Monogastric 

Nutrition. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [ADSC 3300-3300L or POUL 3750] and 

BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 

Comparative nutrition of monogastric animals, with 

special but not exclusive, consideration of poultry and 

swine. 

ANNU 8310. Bioenergetics in Animal Nutrition. 2 

hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 4010/6010. 
Energy transformations in animals including applica- 
tion of thermodynamic principles to the conservation 
and conversion of energy in animals. The energy val- 
ues of feedstuffs as determined by various methods 
will be evaluated. 

ANNU 8320. Vitamins in Animal Nutrition. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 4010/6010. 
The chemistry and physiology of the vitamins and 
their roles in animal metabolism including cellular 
biochemistry and physiology of the vitamins. 

ANNU 8330. Minerals in Animal Nutrition. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 4010/6010. 
Significance of minerals in animal nutrition with em- 
phasis on the physical and chemical principles and dy- 
namic behavior and function of individual elements in 
the organisms as a whole. 

ANNU 8340. Proteins and Amino Acids in Animal 
Nutrition. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 4010/6010. 
Metabolism and utilization of dietary proteins and 
amino acids; methods of supplying amino acids for ef- 
ficient utilization for maintenance, growth and the pro- 
duction products; evaluation of the quality of proteins 
to meet requirements; methods for separation of pro- 
teins, amino acid analysis and determination of protein 
quality will be studied. 

ANNU 8350. Carbohydrates and Lipids in Animal 
Nutrition. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 4010/6010. 
The utilization and metabolism of carbohydrates and 
lipids by animals; biological properties of carbohy- 
drate and lipid foods and their effects on absorption 
and metabolism of the nutrients of the animal diet will 
be evaluated. 

ANNU 8380. Experimental Methods in Animal Nu- 
trition. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 2 lab periods of 3 
hours each per week. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 221 1 and CHEM 221 1L. 
Biochemical nutrition methodology and its utilization 
in performing experiments, recording and interpreting 
data, and writing scientific reports. 

ANNU 8390. Nutrition Seminar. 1 hour. Repeatable 
for maximum 4 hours credit. 1 lab period of 1 hour 
each per week. 

Current problems and papers of scientific work in an- 
imal nutrition. 



92 / The University oj Georgia 



Animal Nutrition • Biological and Agricultural Engineering 



ANNU 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. Non-Traditional 
Format: Independent research under the direction of a 
faculty member. 

ANNU 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. Non-Traditional Format: Independent re- 
search and preparation of the doctoral dissertation. 



Biological and 

Agricultural 

Engineering 



E. Dale Threadgill, Head 

E. William Tollner, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0860 
(Driftmier Engineering Center) 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering offers programs of study leading to 
three degrees: MS with major in biological engi- 
neering, MS with major in agricultural engineer- 
ing and PhD in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Students can focus on several fields 
of interest that include metabolic engineering, 
enzyme engineering, biosensors, biomechanics, 
bioprocessing, image analysis, artificial intelli- 
gence applications, decision support systems, 
electronics and controls, X-ray computed to- 
mography, NMR spectroscopy, postharvest 
engineering, applied electrostatics, food engi- 
neering, crop modeling, agro-meteorology, envi- 
ronmental quality, water quality, soil and water 
engineering, bioresource conversion, and preci- 
sion farming. 

The department has 38 full-time faculty and 
more than 50 research projects housed in three 
units located at the Athens, Griffin, and Tifton 
campuses of the University. The principal facil- 
ities for academic instruction are located in the 
Driftmier Engineering Center on the Athens 
campus. Excellent research facilities and spe- 
cialized modern laboratories are available not 
only on the Athens campus but also at the Grif- 
fin and Tifton campuses. The three locations 
provide exceptional opportunities for laboratory 
and field research under diverse environmental 



conditions. In addition, the department has ag- 
gressive interdisciplinary research programs 
with other departments in the College of Agri- 
cultural & Environmental Sciences, Division of 
Biological Sciences and College of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

The department accepts applications from grad- 
uates with a BS or a MS degree in engineering, 
physics, chemistry, biological sciences, mathe- 
matics, food science, and agricultural sciences. 
Qualified applicants with a non-engineering de- 
gree are required to complete a prescribed set of 
undergraduate engineering science courses. 

A candidate for a MS degree is required to com- 
plete 24 semester hours of course credit and 6 
hours of thesis research. The primary goal of this 
course of study is to have the candidate acquire a) 
deeper understanding in the selected field of 
knowledge, b) ability to synthesize knowledge, c) 
rational problem solving skills, and d) confidence 
in conducting independent work. 

The PhD course of study is designed to 
achieve proficiency in unifying the diverse 
knowledge bases of the biological, agricultural, 
physical, social, and engineering sciences to en- 
able the student to lead in the discovery of engi- 
neering solutions critical to the development of 
complex biological and agricultural systems. 
The department places high value on advanced 
proficiency in mathematics, statistics, selected 
area(s) of science, and knowledge of research 
methods. The selection of courses must be 
guided to have the student acquire a) in-depth 
knowledge in selected area(s) of science, b) abil- 
ity to integrate diverse knowledge, c) creative 
thinking ability for defining problems, and d) 
ability to conduct original research. 

The department provides research and teach- 
ing assistantships to qualified candidates based 
on availability of funds. Applicants desiring fi- 
nancial assistance should apply directly to the 
Graduate Coordinator of the department by Jan- 
uary 31. Applications from under-represented 
groups are highly encouraged. 

ENGR 4210/6210. Linear Systems. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: HNGR 2170. 
Undergraduate corequisite: MiHo 3500 and BCMB 
(BIOD(CHEM) 3100. 

Time and frequency domain analysis ol linear systems, 
convolution, fourier series, and fourief transforms 
with applications. 

ENGR 4220/6220. Feedback Control Sn stems. 
3 hours 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week 
Undergraduate prerequisite: INGR 421076210. 
The analysis m^\ design of continuous and discrete 
tune, and lineai feedback control systems 

Graduate School Description o) I 93 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



ENGR 4230/6230. Sensors and Transducers. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 2170. 
Fundamentals of the sensing process, transducers and 
their environments and the measurement problem. 
Transducer types and modeling. Displacement, mo- 
tion, pressure, fluid-flow, temperature measurements. 

ENGR 4250/6250. Advanced Microcontrollers. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 4240. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: ENGR 

3270. 

Using the MC68HCII to solve practical engineering 

monitoring and control problems. A project-oriented 

course. 

ENGR 4280/6280. Measurement Automation and 

Control. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 

week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 1140 and ENGR 

2170. 

The analysis, design, and programming of systems 

used for automatic data acquisition, measurement, and 

control. 

ENGR 4350/6350. Introduction to Finite Element 
Analysis. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 2140 and MATH 
2700. 

Fundamental finite element theory for the solution of 
engineering problems. Geometrical modelling tech- 
niques, element selection, and tests for accuracy. Em- 
phasis on problems in structural mechanics and 
elasticity. 

ENGR 4360/6360. Advanced Topics in CAD/CAM. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 3300. 

The use of computer aided design/computer aided 

manufacturing. Computer modeling of solid objects, 

advanced mechanism modelling, rapid prototyping 

and virtual reality. 

ENGR 4370/6370. Material Science and Experi- 
mental Stress Analysis. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 
hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 3300. 
Properties and selection of engineering materials. 
Structure of solids and the effects of solidification, 
forming and heat treating operations on material prop- 
erties. Measurement of stresses in materials using 
strain gage and photoelastic technology. 

ENGR 4420/6420. Industrial Ventilation Design 

and Control. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 2150 and ENGR 

3150. 

Engineering design of industrial ventilation systems 

including selection of tans, ductwork, diffusers, hoods, 

air cleaners, and humidifiers. 



ENGR 4440/6440. Environmental Engineering I. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 3410 and ENGR 

3440. 

Engineering science and design related to treatment of 

drinking water and wastewater as well as the treatment 

and ultimate disposal of the sludges created during 

water treatment. 

ENGR 4450/6450. Environmental Engineering II. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 3520 and ENGR 
4480/6480. 

Engineering science and design related to environ- 
mental modeling, solid waste management, and haz- 
ardous waste management. Concepts of risk 
assessment will also be introduced. 

ENGR 4480/6480. Instrumentation for Environ- 
mental Quality. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2700 and PHYS 
1212-1212L. 

Operation of instrumentation used to measure physical 
variables which determine environmental quality. The 
engineering design and application of measuring sys- 
tems for airborne particulates, gaseous atmospheric 
contaminants, solar and environmental radiation, and 
noise will be emphasized. 

ENGR 4510/6510. Engineering and Design of Bio- 
logical Process I. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 3520 and BCMB 
4010/6010 and MIBO 3500. 

Design and analysis of enzymatic and microbial bio- 
logical reaction systems. 

ENGR 4520/6520. Engineering and Design of Bio- 
logical Processes II. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 
3 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 4510/6510. 
Unit operations used for biological processing includ- 
ing filtration, centrifugation, cell disruption, isolation, 
purification, and polishing. 

ENGR 4530/6530. Monitoring and Control of Bio- 
logical Processes. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 4510/6510. 
Concepts of biological process controls; modern con- 
trol techniques and optimization of batch, fed-batch 
and continuous bioreactors, and other biological sys- 
tems. 

ENGR 4540/6540. Applied Machine Vision. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Automated vision systems to identification, measure- 
ment and quality control. Electromagnetic spectrum, 
illumination design, imaging sensor election, vision 
system calibration. Implementation of image process- 
ing algorithms for object recognition and classifica- 
tion. 



94 / The University of Georgia 



Biological and Agricultural Engineering 



ENGR 4550/6550. Processing Plant Design. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 3540. 
Design of systems for processing, primarily based 
upon unit operations processes. Process simulation or 
modelling for optimization purposes will be applied to 
processing systems. Plant layout required for process- 
ing will be included. 

ENGR 4740/6740. Biomaterials. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1108-1108L and 
ENGR 2140. 

Biomaterials and groundwork for topics such as me- 
chanical, chemical, and thermal properties of replace- 
ment materials and tissues. Implantation of materials 
in the body is studied for the biological point of view. 

ENGR 4760/6760. Biomechanics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1108-1108L and 
ENGR 2130 and ENGR 2140. 
The application of engineering principles to body dy- 
namics is discussed. The student should understand 
the mechanics of the musculoskeletal system. A term 
design project is required. 

ENGR 5930/7930. GPS with Engineering and GIS 
Applications. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGR 1120 or GEOG 
4370/6370-4370L/6370L. 

The Global Positioning System, Differential GPS, and 
Real Time Kinematic GPS. Applications of GPS to en- 
gineering and geographic information systems. 

ENGR 6110. Momentum and Heat Transport 

Processes. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: (ENGR 3140 and ENGR 3150 and 
MATH 2700) or permission of major. 
Transport processes with an emphasis on fluid me- 
chanics and heat transfer, transport of momentum and 
energy in continuous media, introduction to approxi- 
mate solutions. 

ENGR 6130. Bioengineering Systems. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: (MATH 2700 and PHYS 1 21 2-1 21 2L) or 
permission of major. 

Integrating physics, mathematics, engineering, and 
chemical and biological principles for analysis of plant 
and animal systems. 

ENGR 6410. Open Channel Hydraulics and Sedi- 
ment Transport. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours 
lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Fundamental mass, energy, and momentum transport 
relations in water flows open to the atmosphere. Chan- 
nel design and measurement of flows in natural chan- 
nel. Sediment transport relations are introduced. 

ENGR 6580. Directed Readings in Bioconversion 
Engineering. 3 hours. 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: (CHEM 2100 and CHEM 21001 ami 
MIBO 3500 and MATH 27(H) and ENGR 3140) or per- 
mission of major. 



Quantitative description of aerobic, facultative, and 
anaerobic fungal/microbial modes for biotransforma- 
tion of organic compounds in natural and controlled 
environments, with emphasis on mathematical repre- 
sentation of mechanisms involved and mechanisms 
manipulation. 

ENGR 6640. Advanced Strength of Materials. 

3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in ENGR 6630. 

Prerequisite: ENGR 2140. 

Advanced topics in strength of materials. Determining 

the stress and strain on members under non-linear 

loading. 

ENGR 6910. Research Methods. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The philosophy of engineering research, research 
methodology, review of the departmental research pro- 
grams, and writing and presenting thesis and disserta- 
tion proposals and grant proposals. 

ENGR 6920. Engineering Design. 3 hours. 4 hours 
lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Fundamentals of engineering design, problem selec- 
tion, and application of design principles to a super- 
vised project. 

ENGR 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ENGR 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ENGR 7430. Nonpoint Source Modeling. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2200 and MATH 2200L and 
PHYS 1111-1 11 1L and CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L. 

Watershed systems, hydrologic processes and pollu- 
tant transport processes; structure and capabilities of 
current watershed computer models, "hands-on'* use 
of some current watershed models; and written and 
oral reports on the model application to an example 
watershed. 

ENGR 8250. Advanced Control Systems. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: HNCiR 4220/6220 or permission of 
major. 

Advanced control techniques Practical aspects of con- 
trol design. 

ENGR 8290. Advanced Instrumentation. 3 hours 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ENGR 4230/6230 or permission o\ 

major. 

The use ol sensors and advanced instrumentation in 

engineering research applications 



Graduate School Description <>/ Count 95 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



ENGR 8420. Theory of Drainage - Saturated Flow. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: (MATH 2700 and CRSS 460076600- 
4600L/6600L) or permission of department. 
The theory of saturated water flow in porous media. 
Steady and unsteady flow will be considered. Applica- 
tions to agricultural drainage and well hydraulics will 
be discussed. 

ENGR 8550. Non-Destructive Characterization of 
Biological Materials. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 

2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ENGR 6130. 

Techniques for non-destructive characterization of bi- 
ological materials or systems. Topics may vary from 
year to year. 

ENGR 8580. Compost Facility Engineering. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ENGR 6580 or permission of major. 
Factors impacting the design and operation of large 
scale composting facilities. 

ENGR 8930. System Simulation. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Solution of engineering/management problems in bio- 
logical and agricultural systems through computer 
modeling and simulation of continuous-time and dis- 
crete-event systems. Deterministic and stochastic sys- 
tems will be considered. Introduction to system 
stability and optimization concepts. 

(ENGR)CSCI 8940. Computational Intelligence. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI(PHIL) 4550/6550 or permission of 

department. 

Programs that solve complex problems in a particular 

domain, typically independent of knowledge used to 

direct the search for an optimal solution. Approaches 

include simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, 

neural networks. 

ENGR 8950. Graduate Seminar. 1 hour. Repeatable 
for maximum 3 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Presentations/discussions related to engineering re- 
search, teaching, design, and service presented by stu- 
dents, faculty, and industry leaders. 

ENGR 8980. Advanced Topics in Biological Engi- 
neering. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced directed readings in special topics in bio- 
logical engineering in an area(s) of interest to the stu- 
dent. 

ENGR 8990. Advanced Topics in Agricultural En- 
gineering. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 
hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced directed readings in special topics in agri- 
cultural engineering in an area of interest to the stu- 
dent. 



ENGR 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ENGR 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Crop and Soil 
Sciences 



Albert E. Smith, Jr., Head 

Nicholas S. Hill, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0923 
(Plant Sciences Building) 

Graduate training leading to the MS and PhD 
degrees is available in all phases of crop and soil 
sciences including international and sustainable 
agriculture. In-depth instruction and research are 
emphasized in both crop and soil science. Areas 
of major specialization in crop science are: plant 
breeding and genetics, physiology, weed con- 
trol, crop production and management, and for- 
age quality and utilization. Areas of major 
specialization in soils are: chemistry, physics, 
environmental physics, classification and gene- 
sis, soil erosion and conservation, fertility and 
plant nutrition, microbiology and mineralogy. A 
range of environmentally-oriented research op- 
portunities are available within the crop and soil 
science areas. Facilities for graduate training in- 
clude three well-equipped Experiment Stations 
(housing modern analytical equipment, growth 
chambers, greenhouses and field plot facilities), 
along with seven field research centers located 
throughout the state. Cooperative studies are en- 
couraged with other departments at the Univer- 
sity, with the Institute of Ecology and the 
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, and with 
federal research laboratories in the area 
(USDA/ARS, EPA). Cooperative projects with 
scientists at the Volcani Center in Israel are also 
available. 

Departmental requirements include attendance 
at graduate seminars. Coursework and research 
topics are individually determined in consultation 
with the student's advisory committee. 

Students with strong backgrounds in biologi- 
cal, geological, physical, chemical, or environ- 



96 / The University of Georgia 



Crop and Soil Sciences 



mental sciences are encouraged to apply as 
prospective candidates for graduate training. 

CRSS 4040/6040. Plant Breeding. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PGEN 3580-3580L or 
permission of major. 

Fundamental principles and theories utilized in the sci- 
ence of plant breeding and cultivar development and 
the role breeding plays in crop improvement. 

CRSS(BTNY) 4210/6210. Seed Physiology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: [CHEM 2100 or CHEM 
221 1 or BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or BCMB 4010/ 
6010] and [PGEN 3580-35 80L or GENE(BIOL) 3200 
or BTNY(CRSS)(BIOL) 4500/6500]. 
Graduate prerequisite: [BCMB 4010/6010 or BCMB 
6000] and [BTNY(CRSS)(BIOL) 4500/6500 or 
BTNY8100]. 

Undergraduate corequisite: CRSS 3300 or HORT 
4210/6210 or HORT 4440/6440-4440L/6440L or 
BTNY 3830-3830L. 

Graduate corequisite: HORT 4210/6210 or HORT 
4440/6440-4440L/6440L or BTNY 6830. 
Regulation of anabolic and catabolic events during 
seed development, maturation, and germination 
processes. Ecophysiological consequences of dor- 
mancy variables, and agricultural and industrial signif- 
icance of seed physiology. 

CRSS 4220/6220. Topics in Crop and Soil Sciences. 

1-4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Topics and methods in Crop and Soil Sciences with a 
different timely topic each semester, including new 
areas of inquiry in crop and soil sciences. 

(CRSS)ENTO 4250/6250-4250L/6250L. ' Pesticide 

Management and Utilization. 3 hours. 3 hours lec- 
ture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L and [(CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or 
(CHEM 22 1 1 and CHEM 22 1 1 L)]. 
Practical management and utilization of pesticides in 
urban and agricultural environments. Subject areas in- 
clude classification of insecticides, herbicides, and 
fungicides, etc., their general chemical and toxicological 
properties, deployment philosophy, hazards and environ- 
mental impact, formulation and application, safety and 
disposal, and management of pesticide resistance. 

CRSS 4260/6260. Forage Management and Utiliza- 
tion. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS 201 0-20 10L or 
permission of department. 

Characteristics of forage species; establishment, phys- 
iology, and morphology effects on management: for- 
age quality and utilization by livestock; grazing 
management; hay and silage; forages tor wildlife and 
conservation. 

CRSS 4300/6300. Crop Production and Manage- 
ment. 3 hours 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRSS 2010-2010L and 
CRSS 3050-3050L. 

Conventional and alternative crop management sys- 
terns, principles, and practices of crop science are used 



in discussion of management problems related to agro- 
nomic crops grown in Georgia. 

CRSS 4340/6340. Weed Science. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: [CHEM 1211 and 121 1L 
and (CRSS 2010-2010L or HORT 2000)] or permis- 
sion of department. 

Fundamentals of weed biology; cultural and chemical 
weed control; properties and uses of herbicides and 
herbicide application equipment; and current systems 
for weed management in cropping programs. 

CRSS 4340L/6340L. Weed Science Laboratory. 

1 hour. 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate corequisite: CRSS 4340/6340. 
Weed identification; symptomology of herbicide ac- 
tion; calibration of herbicide application equipment. 

CRSS 4370/6370. Heavy Metals in the Environ- 
ment. 2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L and (CRSS 3050-3050L or CRSS(FORS)3060- 
3060L)] or permission of major. 
The natural level and sources of, and human activity 
affecting, the heavy metal composition of soils and 
plants, and their potential hazards to plant life and in- 
troduction into the food chain. 

CRSS 4400/6400. Crop Ecology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS 2010-2010L or 
BTNY 1 2 1 0- 1 2 1 0L or permission of major. 
World population growth and food production prob- 
lems; origin, distribution, and adaptation of tropical, 
subtropical, and temperate crop plants as influenced 
by environment with emphasis on climatic factors. 

(CRSS)(BIOL)BTNY 4500/6500. Introduction to 
Gene Technology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
Methods and applications of gene technology (recom- 
binant DNA) and related concepts in molecular biol- 
ogy. These will include structure and synthesis o\ 
macromolecules; cDNA and genomic cloning, poly- 
merase chain reaction; molecular markers and map- 
ping; gene isolation strategies; and various host-vector 
systems. 

CRSS 4520/6520. Field Soil and Site Assessment. 

3 hours. 

1 ndergraduate prerequisite: (CRSS 4540/6540-454017 
65401. and CRSS 4600/6600-46(X)1766(X)L) or per- 
mission of department. 

\\o\k to assess a site to determine if the soil places an\ 
limitations on land use. Topics covered include soil 
sampling, soil landscapes, wetland and hydric soils, 
septic systems, and land application of waste 

CRSS 4540/6540-45401 765401.. PedOtOgy. ) hours 

2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS 3050-30501 or 
CKSSdORS) 3060-30601 or permission ot department. 
Soils as a natural component Of the ecosystem, includ- 
ing morphology, landscape distribution, formation, 
identification of diagnostic horizons and features, anil 
classification. 



Graduate School Description of i 97 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



CRSS 4590/6590-4590L/6590L. Soil Fertility. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS 3050-3050L or 
CRSS(FORS)3060-3060L or permission of major. 
Soil conditions affecting availability of plant nutrients; 
methods of determining soil fertility and insufficiency 
of plant nutrients in soils, and interpretation of chemi- 
cal and biological measurements as related to fertility 
maintenance and good soil management. 

CRSS 4600/6600-4600L/6600L. Soil Physics. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: [(CRSS 3050-3050L or 
CRSS(FORS) 3060-3060L) and MATH 2200 and 
(PHYS 1111-llllLorPHYS 121 1-121 1L)]. 
Graduate prerequisite: MATH 2210. 
Physical properties and process of soils. Water, heat, 
and solute movement in soils. 

CRSS(MIBO) 4610/6610-4610L/6610L. Soil Micro- 
biology. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Microorganisms in soil and their effect on nutrient re- 
cycling, especially as it relates to environmental qual- 
ity and crop production. 

CRSS 4660/6660-4660L/6660L. Chemical Analysis 

of Environmental Samples. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture 

and 3 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 2300 and CHEM 

2300L. 

Analysis of soils, sediment, rocks, water for important 

organic and inorganic contaminants. Chromatography, 

atomic adsorption, and plasma emission spectroscopy, 

field sampling and measurements. Quality assurance/ 

quality control, data reporting, computer use in analysis. 

CRSS 4670/6670. Environmental Soil Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS 3050-3050L or 
CRSS(FORS) 3060-3060L or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Environmental soil chemistry applies and extends the 
concepts of chemistry and physics to the investigation 
of problems related to the physical, chemical, and bio- 
logical characteristics of soil and their importance in 
relation to the management of contaminants, pesti- 
cides, and production inputs. 

CRSS 4670L/6670L. Environmental Soil Chem- 
istry Laboratory. I hour. 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (CRSS 3050-3050L or 
CRSS(FORS) 3060-3060L) and CHEM 2300 and 
CHEM 2300L. 

Undergraduate corequisite: CRSS 4670/6670. 
Laboratory evaluation of soil chemical properties. 

CRSS(ANTHKHORT) 4930/6930. Agriculture and 
Ecology in Tropical America. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Crops and cropping systems in tropical America; in- 
fluences of geography, climate, and socioeconomic 
factors, as well as the impact of agriculture, on the 
ecosystems of the region. 



CRSS(ANTHKHORT) 4940/6940. Agriculture and 
Ecology in Tropical America Field Trip. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 48 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS(HORT)(ANTH) 
4930/6930. 

Intensive field study in a tropical Latin American 
country; crops and cropping systems of tropical Amer- 
ica; influences of geography, climate, and socioeco- 
nomic factors, as well as the impact of agriculture on 
the ecosystems of the region. Conducted in a tropical 
Latin American country. 

CRSS 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a masters degree under the 
direction of faculty members. 

CRSS 7050. Principles of Field Crop Production. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [CRSS 3300 and CRSS 4300/6300] or 
permission of department. 

Effect of environment and heredity on crop produc- 
tion, including light, temperature, water, fertility, and 
other factors affecting plant growth and management. 

CRSS 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

CRSS 8000. Soil Physical Chemistry. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: [CHEM 3100 or (CHEM 2300 and 
CHEM 2300L)] and [CRSS(FORS) 3060-3060L or 
GEOL 1 250- 1 250L] or permission of department. 
Physical and surface chemistry applied to soil-water 
systems. Topics include precipitation-dissolution, 
redox chemistry, complexation, structure of soil-water 
interface, adsorption mechanisms, use of computer 
models to simulate soil chemical reactions, and envi- 
ronmental applications. 

CRSS 8010. Research Methods. 3 hours. 
Scientific method, thesis and journal article prepara- 
tion, manuscript review, seminar presentation, grant 
applications, and computer use related to these topics. 

CRSS 8100. Advanced Crop and Soil Science Sem- 
inar. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 2 hours credit. 
Instruction and practice in oral scientific presentations. 
A literature search within a general topic area unre- 
lated to degree research, and a formal seminar on the 
subject, are required. 

CRSS 8210. Special Problems in Crop and Soil Sci- 
ence. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours 

credit. 

The planning, completion, and reporting of short-term 
projects in crop and soil sciences, other than thesis or 
dissertation, conducted in the laboratory, greenhouse 
or field. 



/ The University of Georgia 



Crop and Soil Sciences 



CRSS 8220. Advanced Topics in Crop and Soil Sci- 
ences. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced topics and methods in Crop and Soil Sci- 
ence, including tropical soil management, application 
of geographic information systems to crop production, 
DRIS analysis, advanced analytical methods, micro- 
climatology, crop modeling, and other timely topics. 

CRSS 8280-8280L. Crops and Microclimate. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BTNY 3830-3830L or permission of de- 
partment. 

Effects of aerial factors (radiation, humidity, tempera- 
ture, wind, atmospheric gases) on crop growth and 
productivity are discussed, along with measurement 
techniques for each. Emphasis is on quantitative 
analysis of processes occurring at the leaf, whole 
plant, and canopy levels. 

CRSS 8330-8330L. Physiology of Herbicide Action. 

2 hours. 1 hour lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: CRSS 4340/6340-4340L/6340L or per- 
mission of department. 

Herbicide action in crops and weeds, including uptake 
through roots, penetration through leaves, and transloca- 
tion in the plant; mechanism and mode of action of indi- 
vidual herbicides as well as metabolism of xenobiotics in 
the plant. Laboratory component consists of research 
techniques used in herbicide physiology research. 

CRSS 8340-8340L. Environmental Aspects of Her- 
bicide Use. 2 hours. 1 hour lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: CRSS 4340/6340-4340L/6340L or per- 
mission of department. 

Behavior of herbicides in soil, water, and air; transfer 
and transformation processes affecting herbicides. 
Laboratory introduces research techniques necessary 
to examine herbicide transfer and transformation. 

CRSS 8350. Weed Ecology. 2 hours 
Prerequisite: CRSS 4340/6340-4340L/6340L or per- 
mission of department. 

Weed succession and development in crops, weed- 
crop interference, and physiological aspects of weed- 
crop interactions with an emphasis on modeling. 

CRSS 8520. Advanced Soil Fertility. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: (CRSS 4590/6590-4590L/6590L and 
CHEM 2300 and CHEM 2300L) or permission of de- 
partment. 

physical, chemical, and biological properties ot soil; 
plant mineral nutrient availability; theor\ and use ot 
modern soil testing methods. Includes soil, environ 
mental, and management factors that control crop use 
of applied chemical fertilizers and other sources of 
plant nutrients. 

CRSS 8540-8540L. Soil Mineralogy. 4 hours 2 hours 
lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: CRSS 4540/6540-4540L/6540LorCRSS 
4670/6670 or GEOL 4300/6300 or permission oi de 

partment. 



Mineral structure, properties, weathering, formation, 
and identification as related to soil behavior, distribu- 
tion, and genesis. Application of laboratory techniques 
for identification and quantification of minerals in 
soils and sediments. 

CRSS 8600. Advanced Soil Physics: Numerical 
Method. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [MATH 2210 and MATH 2210L and 
CRSS 4600/6600-4600L/6600L] or permission of de- 
partment. 

Numerical approach to solving water and solute trans- 
port equations. Two-dimensional water and solute 
movement in unsaturated soils and shallow groundwa- 
ter are examined by solving the governing partial dif- 
ferential equations using a finite difference numerical 
technique. 

CRSS 8610. Advanced Soil Physics: Analytical 
Method. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [MATH 2210 and MATH 2210L and 
CRSS 4600/6600-4600L/6600L] or permission of de- 
partment. 

Analytical approach to solving solute transport equa- 
tions using Laplace transforms. One dimensional de- 
terministic and stochastic transport models for solute 
movement through unsaturated soil are expressed in 
terms of transfer functions and compared. 

CRSS(ECOL) 8650. Nutrient Cycling Models. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [CSCI 7010 and CRSS(MIBO) 4610/ 
6610-4610L/6610L] or permission of department. 
Structure, function, and performance of current nutri- 
ent cycling models used to simulate carbon, nitrogen, 
phosphorus, and sulfur transformations in the soil. 

(CRSS)ECOL 8660-8660L. Soil Biology and Ecol- 
ogy. 4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Not open to students with credit in ECOL(CRSS) 
6650-6650L. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or CRSS 
4590/6590-4590L/6590L or CRSS(MIBO) 4610/ 
661 0-46 10L/6610L. 

Organisms in the soil environment, with emphasis on 
macrobiota and their functional roles in food webs and 
ecosystem processes. 

(CRSS)GEOL 8760. Organic Contaminant Hydro- 
geology. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: (CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or 
(CHEM 2212 and CHEM 22121.) or permission of de- 
partment. 

Physical and chemical processes controlling the mo- 
hilit\ and rale of organic contaminants in soils, sedi- 
ments, surface, and ground waters. Processes include 
biotic and abiotic (hydrolysis, volatilization, sorption, 
redox, and photochemical) reactions m the natural iys- 
tems. Relationships between chemical structure and 
reactivity in the environment. 



Gradual* School Deft nption ofi . < 9V 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



CRSS 8880. Quantitative Aspects of Plant Breed- 
ing. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [CRSS 4040/6040 and STAT 6220] or 
permission of department. 

Quantitative and population plant genetics and their 
interrelationship with plant breeding. Genetic and en- 
vironmental variation and how they relate to selection 
procedures and choice of type of variety. 

CRSS 8890-8890L. Plant Cytogenetics. 3 hours. 

2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BTNY 8100 or permission of department. 
Classical and molecular cytogenetics are integrated to 
explain the reproductive behavior of angiosperms, the 
applications of cytogenetics to plant improvement, and 
the study of plant genetics. 

CRSS(BTNY) 8900. Advanced Plant Genetics. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: BTNY 8100 or CRSS 8890-8890L or 
permission of department. 

Recent developments in plant genetics: sexual incom- 
patibilities and somatic hybridization, genetic engineer- 
ing; RFLPs and other molecular markers, linkage and 
mapping: cytoplasmic genetics; and classic papers. 

CRSS 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CRSS 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 2 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Entomology 



Ray Noblet, Head 

Kenneth G. Ross, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-7699 
(Biological Sciences Building) 

Requirements for the PhD include completion of 
research skills requirement in statistics, computer 
science, foreign language or comparable skill. 

The Department of Entomology offers graduate 
work leading to the professional MPPPM (Master 
of Plant Protection and Pest Management) degree, 
and the MS and PhD degrees. The MPPPM is a 
non-thesis degree requiring specified graduate 
level course work, two semesters of internship, 
plus selected graduate level electives. The MS and 
PhD are research degrees requiring course work 
plus original research leading to a thesis or disser- 
tation. Students holding the baccalaureate degree 



100 / The University of Georgia 



are normally admitted at the MS level but may pe- 
tition to bypass this degree and work towards the 
PhD after meeting specific departmental require- 
ments. 

In addition to the faculty at the Athens cam- 
pus, students may carry out research under the 
direction of faculty at the Experiment Station at 
Griffin or at Tifton, Georgia. Facilities and op- 
portunities for studies on applied aspects of en- 
tomological problems and integrated pest 
management are emphasized at the stations. On 
the Athens campus, faculty joint staffed with the 
Departments of Ecology, Genetics, Biochem- 
istry and Molecular Biology, Biological Sci- 
ences Division, the Museum of Natural History, 
and the interdisciplinary toxicology program en- 
able students to earn a degree in entomology 
with training in related disciplines. 

Facilities outside the department include elec- 
tron transmission and scanning microscopes, 
cell sorter, monoclonal and sequencing labs, 
computer facilities, nine agricultural research 
farms, forest research areas, the Museum of Nat- 
ural History, and the U.S.D.A., U.S.E.P.A., and 
Forestry laboratories. Particularly good library 
facilities in entomology are available at the 
Athens campus. 

Departmental teaching and research assistant- 
ships are available from the department. Other 
financial aid is available through the Graduate 
School, but applications should be submitted to 
the Department of Entomology. Students with- 
out previous courses in entomology, genetics, or 
biochemistry may be required to make up defi- 
ciencies. 

ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/6000L. General Entomol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 107-1 107L and 
BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 

Functional anatomy and physiology, behavior, ecol- 
ogy, insects as vectors of pathogens, chemical and bi- 
ological control of pests. Laboratory sessions are 
devoted primarily to collecting and the identification 
of major families of insects. 

ENTO 4010/6010-4010L/6010L. Insect Taxonomy. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/ 
6000L or permission of department. 
Insect identification, classification, and phylogeny; 
collection and preparation techniques for insect speci- 
mens; introduction to theoretical and practical aspects 
of systematica. 

(ENTO)BCMB 4200/6200. Biotechnology. 3 hours 
Not open to students with credit in BCMB 4130/6130. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 or BCMB 4010/6010. 



Entomology 



Applied aspects of biochemistry and molecular biol- 
ogy in various fields, with emphasis on the use of re- 
combinant DNA methods and protein engineering. 

ENTO(CRSS) 4250/6250-4250L/6250L. Pesticide 
Management and Utilization. 3 hours. 3 hours lec- 
ture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L and [(CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or 
(CHEM 2211 and CHEM 2211L)]. 
Practical management and utilization of pesticides in 
urban and agricultural environments. Subject areas in- 
clude classification of insecticides, herbicides, and 
fungicides, etc., their general chemical and toxicolog- 
ical properties, deployment philosophy, hazards and 
environmental impact, formulation and application, 
safety and disposal, and management of pesticide re- 
sistance. 

ENTO 4400/6400-4400L/6400L. Insect Behavior. 

3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/ 
6000L. 

Principles of behavior; communication, sexual behav- 
ior, anti-predator adaptations, insect-plant interactions, 
and insect sociality. 

ENTO 4740/6740-4740L/6740L. Insect Pest Man- 
agement. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENTO 3740-3740L or 
permission of department. 

Major applied insect control techniques; the advan- 
tages and limitations of these tactics including practi- 
cality, economics, environmental impact, etc. 
Integrated control systems for development of a pest 
management program. 

ENTO 4820/6820-4820L/6820L. Entomology in 
Natural Resources Management. 3 hours. 3 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L or 
BIOL 1 108- 1 108L or permission of department. 
Arthropods important in management of forest re- 
sources including timber, wildlife, and recreation. 

ENTO 5730/7730-5730L/7730L. Entomology for 

Teachers. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 

week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Insects and related tonus, their identification, and life 

habits, with emphasis on their use in pre-college life 

science curricula. 

ENTO 6130. Internship in Crop Protection and 

Pest Management. 1 hour. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Working experience with public or private agencies 

concerned with pest management 

ENTO 6150. Insect Physiology 3 hours 
Prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/6000L and 

[BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM)31(K)orCBIO(BK)L)34(K)|. 
Organization and function of organ s\ stems in insects, 
emphasizing evolutionary and molecular perspectives. 



ENTO 6500-6500L. Insect Ecology. 3 hours. 2 hours 

lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 

Special ecology of insects in natural and managed 

ecosystems. 

ENTO 6600-6600L. Insect Morphology. 3 hours. 
3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ENTO 40 10/601 0-40 10L/6010L or per- 
mission of department. 

Form and function of insect anatomy in phylogenetic 
context; techniques for dissection, preparation and il- 
lustration of insect morphology. 

ENTO(MIBO) 6670-6670L. Insect Pathogens. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Insect pathology, including history, classification of 
diseases, insect response to .pathogens, normal in- 
sect/microbe ecology, and the production and use of 
insect pathogens for pest control. 

ENTO 6940-6940L. Aquatic Entomology. 4 hours 
3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/6000L or per- 
mission of department. 

Ecology, life history, biology, and taxonomy of aquatic 
insects, their role in ecosystems and biological moni- 
toring. 

ENTO 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ENTO 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ENTO 8000. Entomology Seminar. 12 hours Re 
peatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Entomology, both fundamental and applied, including 
literature reviews and discussion of recent events. 

ENTO 8050. Principles of Systematics. 2 hours 
3 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/6000L or per- 
mission of department. 

History and philosophy of systematics. the science of 
biological classification, with special reference to in 
sects Methods of analysis and types of data m sys- 
tematic biology. 

ENTO 8080. Topics in Insect Ph\siolon> and Bio- 
chemistry. 2 hours. Repeatable tor maximum 6 hours 
credit. 2 hours lab per week 

Prerequisite: ENTO 6150 or permission of depart- 
ment. 
Special topics in insect phvsioloi.'\ and biochemistry. 

ENTO 8100. Evolution of Insects. 2 hours 3 hours 
lab per week 

Prerequisite: ENTO 4(KH)/f>(HH)-4(MM)L/o(KH)I . or per- 
mission ot department 



Graduate \c hool Description ot Courses / 101 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



Organic evolution, the history of evolutionary thought, 
methods for studying evolution, and contemporary 
topics in evolutionary theory with a special emphasis 
on insects. 

(ENTOXBTNY)ECOL 8150. Wetland Ecology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission o'f department. 
Principles of ecology, elemental cycling, hydrology, 
policy and management of marine and freshwater wet- 
lands. 

(ENTO)(BTNY)ECOL 8150L. Wetland Ecology 
Laboratory. 1 hour. 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ECOL(ENTO)(BTNY) 8150 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Techniques for the study of marine and freshwater 
wetlands. Optional weekend field trips will explore 
distant wetland sites. 

ENTO 8310. Insect/Plant Interactions. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: ENTO 6150 or permission of department. 
Chemical and physical description of insect/plant in- 
teractions. Emphasis placed on the plant surface and 
its role in insect behavior. 

ENTO 8570. Molecular Entomology. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: ENTO 6150 or permission of department. 
Contemporary issues in insect physiology, develop- 
ment, behavior, and control, with an emphasis on the 
latest molecular information. 

ENTO 8650. Vector Biology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture 
and 3 hours lab per week. 

Identification, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry 
of arthropod vectors and associated disease-causing 
parasites; vector-host and vector-parasite interactions; 
current research topics. 

ENTO 871 0-87 10L. Immature Insects. 3 hours. 

1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/6000L or per- 
mission of department. 

Classification, identification, biology, and economic 
significance of insect larvae. 

ENTO 8820. Biological Control. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: ENTO 4000/6000-4000L/6000L or per- 
mission of department. 

Biological control of arthropod pests and weeds; biol- 
ogy of parasitoids and predators; historical perspec- 
tive, ecological basis and implementation in traditional 
and alternative agricultural systems; integration with 
other pest management tactics. 

ENTO 8900. Problems in Entomology. 1-9 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Special problems and topics in entomology. 

ENTO 9000. Doctoral Research. 1 9 hours. Repeat- 
able tor maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 



102 / The University of Georgia 



ENTO 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Environmental Health 
Science 



Harold M. Barnhart, Interim Head 
Phillip L. Williams, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0606 
(Environmental Health Science Building) 

The Department of Environmental Health Science 
offers three graduate programs: MS in environ- 
mental health; MS in toxicology; and PhD in tox- 
icology. The MS degree in environmental health is 
offered with the opportunity to specialize in envi- 
ronmental protection, industrial hygiene, or public 
health and may be completed as a terminal degree 
or as a preparatory step toward a PhD degree. The 
two toxicology degrees are offered through the 
University's Interdisciplinary Toxicology Pro- 
gram (see the section in this bulletin entitled, Gen- 
eral Degrees: Interdisciplinary Programs ) and 
students can pursue an emphasis in environmental 
or mammalian toxicology. 

Faculty within the Department of Environ- 
mental Health Science have expertise in several 
fundamental and applied disciplines affording a 
diverse selection of courses and research pro- 
grams. Courses in environmental air and water 
quality, risk assessment, industrial hygiene, tox- 
icology, waste management, environmental epi- 
demiology, and statistics provide in-depth 
training for employment in commercial con- 
cerns, government agencies and academic insti- 
tutions. Research resources include facilities 
equipped to handle a wide-range of chemical 
analyses, toxicological bioassays, air or water 
quality assessments, microbiological and envi- 
ronmental issues. 

Prospective students who desire financial aid 
may apply for assistance directly to the Depart- 
ment of Environmental Health Science. A lim- 
ited number of research and teaching 
assistantships are available through individual 
faculty members. Other assistantships are avail- 
able through the Graduate School and applica- 
tion for these should be made through the 
Environmental Health Science Graduate Coor- 
dinator. 



Environmental Health Science 



EHSC 4080/6080. Environmental Air Quality. 

2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 
221 1L. 

Sources and control of community air pollution; ef- 
fects of air pollutants on human health and the envi- 
ronment; regulatory and public policy issues. 

EHSC 4100/6100-4100L/6100L. Industrial Hygiene. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 
221 1L. 

The anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control 
of those environmental factors, arising in or from the 
workplace, which can cause sickness, impaired health 
and well-being, or significant discomfort and ineffi- 
ciency among workers or among community citizens. 

EHSC 4150/6150. Solid and Hazardous Waste 
Management. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 
221 1L and MATH 1 1 13 and STAT 2000. 
Regulatory, chemical, and engineering aspects of solid 
and hazardous waste management, including RCRA, 
CERCLA, landfill and incinerator design, pollutant 
transport and fate, and potential for human health im- 
pacts. 

(EHSC)FDST(MIBO) 431076310-4310L/6310L. 
Environmental Microbiology. 3 hours. 2 hours lec- 
ture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Types of microorganisms in the environment; effect of 
environmental conditions on microbial existence; pub- 
lic health aspects of environmental microbiology; ap- 
plications of microorganisms to solve environmental 
problems. 

(EHSC)FDST(MIBO) 4320/6320-4320L/6320L. 
Microbiology of Food Sanitation. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Microorganisms and practices important in food in- 
dustry sanitation and safety; microorganisms involved 
and control measures taken to prevent food borne ill- 
ness, with emphasis on food process operations. 

EHSC 4350/6350-4350L/6350L. Environmental 
Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: EHSC 4150/6150. 
Chemical principles of environmental processes which 
result from natural or human-generated phenomena; 
air, water, and soil chemical reactions involving pollu- 
tants and wastes; measurement of pollutants in the en- 
vironment. 

EHSC 4490/6490. Environmental Toxicology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 221 1 and CHEM 
221 1L and (BIOL 1 104-1 KWL or BIOL 1108-11081 ). 
Extent and significance of toxic agents in the environ 

ment, and the physical, chemical, and biological 
processes which determine their behavior, fate, and ul- 
timate effect on human health. 



EHSC 4590/6590-4590L/6590L. Water and Waste- 
water. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Chemistry and microbial life of water and wastewater, 
domestic and industrial, with scrutiny of current treat- 
ment processes. Sampling methods will be demon- 
strated. Effects of different types of waste on microbial 
population of rivers and streams. 

EHSC 4610/6610. Water Pollution and Human 

Health. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: EHSC 3060. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 

2211 and CHEM 221 1L. 

Human health issues related to water consumption and 

use, focusing on water contamination from municipal, 

industrial, and agricultural practices. 

EHSC 6010. Proseminar in Environmental Health. 

1 hour. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Research methods with an emphasis on presentation 

and instructional techniques. 

EHSC 7000. Master's Research. 1-12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

EHSC 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

EHSC 8100. Current Topics in Environmental 
Health Science. 2 hours. 

Public health, industrial hygiene, environmental pro- 
tection, hazardous waste management, and environ- 
mental/occupational toxicology. 

EHSC(AAEC) 8120. Roles and Responsibilities of 
Environmental Policy Makers. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Roles of science, engineering, law. journalism, eco- 
nomics, grass roots activism, and the legislative and 
regulatory process in the development of environmen- 
tal policy. 

EHSC 8150. Environmental Health Seminar. 
1 hour. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected topics in environmental health. 

EHSC 8510-8510L. Lnvironmental Risk Assess 
ment and Communication. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite EHSC 4490/6490 01 PHRMl VPII Y . 
6910 oi MRM(VPm xPOl'l id HSCi 8930 or per 
mission oi department 

Assessment of risks related to environmental expo- 
sures; government agenc) definition and conduct of 

risk assessments, public communication oi environ- 
mental exposure risks 



Graduate \< //<><>/ Description of Course* 103 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



EHSC(ECOL) 8610. Aquatic Toxicology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 221 1L and 
[EHSC 4490/6490 or PHRM(VPHY) 6910 or 
PHRM(VPHY)(POUL)(EHSC) 8920]. 
Toxicological effects of aquatic pollution focusing on 
fate and transport of xenobiotics; xenobiotic accumu- 
lation, dynamics, and toxicity in aquatic organisms; 
the analysis and modeling of the effects of aquatic pol- 
lution on organisms; and the determination of related 
risks to aquatic ecosystems and human populations. 

(EHSC)ECOL 8630-8630L. Quantitative Ecologi- 
cal Toxicology. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours 
lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L and (STAT 
4220 or STAT 6220). 

Principles and quantitative methods for the analysis of 
ecotoxicological data. 

EHSC 8800. Special Problems in Environmental 
Health Science. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
6 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research or intensive study in a specialized area of en- 
vironmental health under the direction of a faculty 
member. 

(EHSC)PHRM(POUL)(VPHY) 8930. Chemical 
Toxicology. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHRM(VPHY) 6910 or permission of 
department. 

Chemical contamination of air, water, and food by 
major agricultural and industrial chemicals. Emphasis 
will be placed on sources of contamination, fate of 
chemicals in the environment, target species, health ef- 
fects, chemical analyses, and contamination control. 

EHSC 9000. Doctoral Research. 112 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

EHSC 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 112 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of a major pro- 
fessor. 



Food Science and 
Technology 

Joseph F. Frank, Acting Head 

Philip E. Koehler, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-1099 
(Food Science Building) 

Programs of study leading to both the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 



food science are offered in the various fields of 
interest in the Division of Food Science and 
Technology. 

Since the application of science and engineer- 
ing is important in properly selecting, preparing, 
processing, packaging, distributing and utilizing 
foods, students selecting this field must be able 
to delve into problems involving chemistry, mi- 
crobiology, engineering, and other sciences as 
well as in the more applied problems concerned 
with food production, stability, or toxicology. 
Individuals whose baccalaureate degree is in 
other fields of science often enter this graduate 
program because of the important challenges of 
supplying food to mankind and the opportunities 
that this field provides to those with advanced 
degrees. Programs of study are designed for 
each individual to best utilize his/her prior train- 
ing and his/her career objectives. The food sci- 
ence and technology division occupies the food 
science building and the food processing labora- 
tory in the University of Georgia Science Com- 
plex on South Campus in Athens and the food 
science building at the Georgia Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station in Griffin. All three buildings 
are well-equipped with modern instrumentation, 
pilot plants, and other facilities necessary for 
graduate research in food processing, food 
chemistry, food microbiology, food engineering, 
sensory evaluation, food biotechnology, food 
toxicology, product development, and nutrient 
analyses. Faculty in the division are scientists 
and engineers with expertise in several funda- 
mental and applied disciplines offering a diverse 
selection of courses and research programs. 

FDST 4010/6010. Principles of Food Processing. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500 and CHEM 

2100 and CHEM 2100L and (FDST 2010 or FDST 

3000). 

Principles of food preservation by chilling, freezing, 

dehydration, fermentation, and thermal processing. 

FDST 4020/6020. Processing Methods in Food Sci- 
ence. 2 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: FDST 40 1 0/60 1 0. 
Processing methods to control microbial and enzy- 
matic activity and to minimize chemical and physical 
deterioration of foods. 

FDST(MIBO) 4030/6030-4030L/6030L. Food Mi- 
crobiology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Interactions of microorganisms with food and the im- 
plications of these interactions for food preservation, 
safety, and fermentations. Pathogenic microorganisms 



104 / The University of Georgia 



Food Science and Technology 



associated with food. Analysis of foods for the pres- 
ence of microorganisms. 

FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L. Food Chemistry. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 and (FDST 3000 or FDST 4010/6010). 
Chemical, physical, and functional properties of food 
constituents and ingredients. 

FDST 4050/6050-4050L/6050L. Food Engineering 
Fundamentals. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 1111-1111L and 
MATH 2210 and MATH 2210L. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: FDST 
4010/6010. 

Mass and energy balance, fluid flow, heat transfer, and 
refrigeration in food plant operations. The theory, cal- 
culations and design practices, and equipment used in 
these operations, as well as the physical, chemical, and 
microbial changes that can occur in foods in processes 
employing these operations. 

FDST 4060/6060-4060L/6060L. Food Engineering 
Fundamentals. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: FDST 4050/6050-4050L/ 
6050L or permission of department. 
Phase equilibria in foods, psychrometrics, water activ- 
ity, freezing, dehydration, evaporation, membrane sep- 
arations, extrusion, and process control. 

FDST 4070/6070. Nutritional Quality and the Ef- 
fect of Technology. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: FDST 4040/6040-4040L/ 
6040L or BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 
The nutritional properties of food and the effects of 
modern technology on nutritional quality. 

FDST 4080/6080-4080I76080L. Instrumental Meth- 
ods of Food Analysis. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 
2 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 2100 and CHEM 
2100L. 

Spectrophotometric, colormetric, chromatographic, 
and potentiometric methods of analysis as applied to 
food. Emphasis will be placed upon correlation and in- 
terpretation of results. 

FDST 4090/6090-4090L/6090L. Food Quality Con- 
trol. 2 hours. 1 hour lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: [FDST 2010 or FDST 
3000] and STAT 2000. 

Designing and implementing food quality and process 
control programs. Monitoring and controlling process 
specifications and capabilities. Developing food at- 
tribute and variable control charts. Examining food 
sampling plans and verifying HACCP food satcu 
plans. 

FDST 4100/6100. Governmental Regulation of 
Food Safety and Quality. 2 hours 

Role of mandatory and optional food laws and regula- 
tions exercised by state, federal and international 



agencies on food quality, safety, wholesomeness, and 
nutrition. 

FDST 4110/6110-4110L/6110L. Food Packaging. 

2 hours. 1 hour lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: FDST 3000. 
Raw materials, processes, and machinery used in the 
transportation, storage, and marketing of packaged 
food products. The relationship between packaging 
materials, food processing operations, and product 
quality. Evaluation of chemical and physical proper- 
ties of food package materials. 

FDST(MIBO) 4120/6120-4120L/6120L. Food Fer- 
mentations. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Microbial and technical aspects of dairy, vegetable, 
meat, grain, and fruit fermentations. Products studied 
include cheese, sausage, beer, wine, and soy sauce. 

FDST 4130/6130. Food Biotechnology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 or permission of department. 
Recombinant DNA in food and enzyme biotechnol- 
ogy, tissue culture, and microbial transformations. Ap- 
plications and regulations of biotechnology in the fats 
and oils industry. 

FDST(ADSC) 4140/6140-4140L/6140L. Advanced 
Meat Science. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: FDST(MIBO) 4030/ 
6030-4030L/6030L and FDST 4040/6040-4040L/ 
6040L. 

Meat processing and technology, scientific basis for 
meat as a food, USDA and FDA regulations governing 
meat processing, and the latest innovations in com- 
mercial meat processing. 

FDST 4250/6250-4250L/6250L. New Food Product 
Development. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (FDST 4010/6010 and 
FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L) or permission of de- 
partment. 

New food product development, food constituents and 
functionality, ingredient functions and selection, sen- 
sory evaluation/application, dietary guidelines and 
food regulations affecting product development, new 
product development project management, protecting 
innovations, market testing. 

FDST(EHS( HMIBO) 43 10/631 0-43 10L/6310L. 
Environmental Microbiology. 3 hours 2 hours lec- 
ture and 3 hours lab per week 
Undergraduate prerequisite MIBO 3300. 
types oi microorganisms in the e n vironment; ctkvt oi 
environmental conditions 00 microbial existence; pub- 
lic health aspects ot environmental microbiology; ^p 

plications of microorganisms to solve en\ iionmental 
problems 



tool Description of Count 105 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



FDST(EHSC)(MIBO) 4320/6320-4320L/6320L. 
Microbiology of Food Sanitation. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Microorganisms and practices important in food in- 
dustry sanitation and safety; microorganisms involved 
and control measures taken to prevent food borne ill- 
ness, with emphasis on food process operations. 

(FDST)POUL 4860L/6860L. Poultry Processing. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: POUL 3600 or FDST 
2010 or FDST 3000 or permission of department. 
Basic principles and methods of processing poultry 
and eggs. Broiler harvesting, slaughter, evisceration, 
plant sanitation, microbiology, inspection, grading, 
regulations, water and waste water handling, quality 
control and HACCP plans, further processing, and 
shell egg handling and processing. 

FDST 5010/7010-5010D/7010D. Food Formulation 
and Preservation. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in FDST 4010/6010. 
Food preservation by chilling, freezing, fermentation, 
canning, and dehydration. Formulation of food prod- 
ucts and interactions of food ingredients. Applications 
of principles to experiments in food science. 

(FDST)ADSC 6170-6170L. Experimental Tech- 
niques in Meat Science and Muscle Biology. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or STAT 
4220 or STAT 6220 or permission of department. 
Basic methods in laboratory techniques in meat sci- 
ence. Experiments will familiarize students from a 
wide variety of backgrounds with a number of labora- 
tory techniques, including lipogenesis, muscle histol- 
ogy, enzyme kinetics, and muscle metabolism. 

FDST 6500. Proseminar in Food Science. 1 hour. 
Seminar on research methods with an emphasis on 
presentation and instructional techniques; required of 
all new Food Science graduate students. 

(FDST)ADSC 6890. Advanced Meat Science. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The theories and methods used in meat science in de- 
termination of tissue growth; compositional tech- 
niques; muscle protein and lipid organization, 
structure, and function; biochemical conversion of 
muscle to meat, and its impact on meat quality and 
palatability in meat animals. 

FDST 7000. Master's Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 40 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
direction of faculty members. 

FDST 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
1 "hesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 



FDST 8010. Food Lipids. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L or 
BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Structure, composition, preservation, deterioration, 
analysis, nutritional qualities, functional properties, 
and biotechnological modification of lipids. Fat sub- 
stitutes in foods. 

FDST 8020-8020L. Flavor Chemistry and Evalua- 
tion. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: (STAT 4210 or STAT 6210) and CHEM 
2100andCHEM2100L. 

Sensory methods of evaluating flavor and physical or 
chemical methods of measuring flavor components; 
the flavor characteristics of various chemicals, espe- 
cially as influenced by concentration and interaction 
with other compounds; flavor formulation; and the sta- 
bility of flavor substances during processing and stor- 
age. 

FDST 8030. Seafood Technology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: (FDST 4010/6010 and FDST 4040/6040- 
4040L/6040L) or permission of department. 
Fishery resources and availability as food, nutritive 
composition, postharvest biochemical and microbial 
changes, fishing and handling technology, chilling and 
freezing, dehydration/smoking/salting, fermentation, 
canning, minced fish technology, aquaculture, quality 
and safety evaluation, distribution and marketing. 

FDST 8040. Food Colorants. 3 hours 
The chemical, biochemical, and nutritive properties of 
natural and artificial food colorants. Methods used for 
their isolation and study are demonstrated. 

FDST 8050. Food Toxicology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: FDST(MIBO) 4030/6030-4030L/6030L. 
Principles and problems in evaluating the wholesome- 
ness and safety of foods, food components, and inten- 
tional or incidental additives. Consideration of 
selective toxicity, detoxication mechanisms, structure 
and biological activity; basic concepts and techniques 
of safety evaluation, interpretation of biological data. 

FDST 8060-8060L. Advanced Food Processes. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: FDST 4050-4050L. 
The principles and basis for recently developed food 
processes. Analysis of equipment requirements and 
cost comparisons with conventional systems. Produc- 
tion of novel foods and ingredients using advanced 
technology. Plant simulation and optimization of 
processes 

FDST 8070. Food Proteins and Enzymes. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L or 

BCMB 4010/6010. 

Biochemistry of structure and function of proteins and 
enzymes important in food applications and as food in- 
gredients. 



106 / The University of Georgia 



Horticulture 



FDST 8080-8080L. Food Texture. 3 hours. 2 hours 

lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L and 

FDST 4050/6050-4050L/6050L. 

Food texture and rheology. Viscoelastic models of 

food systems. Instrumental and sensory methods of 

analysis. Factors affecting food texture. Texture of 

specific systems including liquids, gels, emulsions, 

and solids. 

FDST 8090. Advanced Food Microbiology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: FDST(MIBO) 4030/6030-4030L/6030L. 
Physiology and biochemistry of food-borne microor- 
ganisms; microbial control in food systems; advanced 
analytical techniques in food microbiology. 

FDST 8100. Food Carbohydrates. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The classes, structure, composition, properties, reac- 
tions, uses in food, biotechnological modification and 
analysis of carbohydrates. 

FDST 8110. Food Research and the Scientific 
Method. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Research as a process that transforms ideas into acces- 
sible knowledge. Unit operations include idea genera- 
tion, problem definition, critical evaluation of 
literature, method selection, experimental design, data 
collection, processing and analysis, and knowledge 
dissemination. Additional aspects include philosophy, 
grantsmanship, planning, laboratory set-up and man- 
agement, and career development. 

FDST 8120-8120L. Food Structure and Properties. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: FDST 4040/6040-4040L/6040L and 
FDST 4050/6050-4050L/6050L. 
Structural and microstructural aspects of foods. Meth- 
ods for analyzing food structure. Food polymer and 
colloid systems. Aspects of structure which determine 
mechanical, thermal, and dielectric properties of 
foods. 

FDST 8130. Contemporary Issues in Minimally 
Processed Chilled Foods. 3 hours 

Prerequisite or corequisite: FDST 4010/6010 and 
FDST(MIBO) 4030/6030-4030L/6030L and FDST 
4040/6040-4040L/6040L. 

Enumeration of minimally processed products for 
chilled distribution and factors affecting quality dete- 
rioration, including microbiological, enzymatic, bio- 
chemical and physical aspects. Minimal processing 
and refrigeration enhancements are identified, hurdle 
technologies probed, and questions lor future work 
raised. Critical challenges to safet) and quality of this 
largest and fastest-growing ol all food categories are 
explored. 

FDST 8500. Food Science Seminar. 1 hour. Repeal 
able for maximum 2 hours credit. 
Discussion of selected topics in \ood science 



FDST 8800. Special Problems in Food Science. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Selected problems associated with food science will 
be studied to develop greater facility in the application 
of scientific methods to the solution of problems. The 
student will work closely with an advisor to plan and 
complete a research project. 

FDST 8900. Topics in Food Science. 1-3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Analysis of emerging issues and developing technolo- 
gies in Food Science. 

FDST 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

FDST 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Horticulture 



Douglas A. Bailey, Head 

Hazel Y. Wetzstein, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2471 
(Plant Sciences Building) 

The Department of Horticulture offers graduate 
work leading to the Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Active teaching 
and research programs are being conducted in or- 
namental horticulture, floriculture, fruits, vegeta- 
bles, and nut crops. Students can focus on areas of 
specialization that include plant breeding, ph\ siol- 
ogy, plant development, biotechnology, post- 
harvest physiology, nutrition, biochemistry, inte- 
grated pest management, weed control, water 
relations, crop production and management, and 
product utilization. The department has about 40 
full-time faculty members located at the Athens, 
Tifton and Griffin campuses, and various other lo- 
cations in the state. The facilities available for 
graduate training include three well-equipped Ex- 
periment stations, the State Botanical Garden, and 
Several Held research centers thai represent the cli- 
matic areas of the state. The department has strong 
interdiscipiinai) research programs with other de- 
partments in the University. Cooperative work is 
available with three federal research laboratories. 

Graduate work in Horticulture is designed to 
develop a high order o\ independent thought, 
broad knowledge, and technical skills. The em 



Graduate School Description of G u 107 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



phasis in graduate work is placed on research, 
supplemented by courses and seminars. 

The program for either graduate degree is 
planned on an individual basis by the student 
and his/her advisory committee to complement 
previous experience and career objectives. Ad- 
mission status, credit requirements, transfer 
credits accepted, academic standards, residence 
requirements, and time limits conform to regula- 
tions as given by the Graduate School and the 
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sci- 
ences. Students with strong backgrounds in the 
biological and/or plant sciences are encouraged 
to apply. For further information see the Horti- 
culture web site at http://www.uga.edu/hort. 

HORT 4010/6010-4010L/6010L. Olericulture. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: HORT 3010. 
Current cultural practice of and environmental influ- 
ence on vegetable crop production. 

HORT 4020/6020-4020L/6020L. Pomology. 4 hours. 
3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: HORT 3020 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Culture and management of orchard crops, including 
site selection, cultivar and rootstock selection, pruning 
and training, propagation, integrated pest manage- 
ment, physiology of flowering and fruiting, harvest 
and postharvest procedures. Laboratory provides 
hands-on experience pruning, training, and budding 
trees, and using/calibrating equipment needed for 
managing orchards. 

HORT 4050/6050. Greenhouse Management I. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1103-1103L or 
BTNY 1210-1210L. 

Principles and practices of the production of green- 
house pot plants, bedding plants, and cut flowers. Em- 
phasis placed on production practices, environmental 
and operational management, and cost estimation. 

HORT 4060/6060. Greenhouse Management II. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 103-1 103L or 
BTNY 1210-1210L. 

Study of commercial greenhouse crop production 
practices with special emphasis on pot plant produc- 
tion techniques, plant nutrition, fertilizers, and use of 
growth regulators. Student will be responsible for the 
culture of a greenhouse crop. 

HORT 4070/6070. Special Problems in Horticul- 
ture I. 1-5 hours. 

Research on special problem under direction of fac- 
ulty. 

HORT 4080/6080. Special Problems in Horticul- 
ture II. 1-5 hours. 

Advanced research on problem of special interest 
under direction of faculty. 



HORT 4110/6110. Plant Nutrition. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS 3050-3050L. 
Mineral nutrition of higher green plants. 

HORT 4210/6210. Postharvest Physiology of Horti- 
cultural and Agronomic Crops. 4 hours. 3 hours lec- 
ture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 107-1 107L or 
BTNY 1210-1210L or (CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L). 

Catabolic and anabolic metabolism, and anatomical 
and pathological responses of harvested fruits, vegeta- 
bles, nuts, seeds, cut flowers, and intact plants. Trans- 
portation, refrigeration, controlled atmospheric 
storage, drying, and packaging of harvested products. 

HORT 4440/6440-4440L/6440L. Environmental 
Physiology in Horticulture. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 

Not open to students with credit in BTNY 4850/6850- 
4850L/6850L or BTNY 8890-8890L or CRSS 3300. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (BIOL 1 103-1 103L and 
BIOL 1104-1104L) or (BIOL 1107-1107L and BIOL 
1 108-1 108L) or (BTNY 1210-1210Land BTNY 1220- 
1220L). 

Effects of environmental factors on growth and physi- 
ology of horticultural plants and modification of the 
plant's environment to improve crop production. 

HORT 4890/6890. Biodiversity and the World's 

Food Crops. 3 hours. 

Molecular, organismal, ecological, and sociocultural 

aspects of biodiversity. Independent research project 

required. 

(HORT)(ANTH)CRSS 4930/6930. Agriculture and 
Ecology in Tropical America. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Crops and cropping systems in tropical America; in- 
fluences of geography, climate, and socioeconomic 
factors, as well as the impact of agriculture, on the 
ecosystems of the region. 

(HORT)(ANTH)CRSS 4940/6940. Agriculture and 
Ecology in Tropical America Field Trip. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 48 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS(HORT)(ANTH) 
4930/6930. 

Intensive field study in a tropical Latin American 
country; crops and cropping systems of tropical Amer- 
ica; influences of geography, climate, and socioeco- 
nomic factors, as well as the impact of agriculture on 
the ecosystems of the region. Conducted in a tropical 
Latin American country. 

HORT 7000. Master's Research. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 



108 / The University of Georgia 



Plant Pathology 



HORT 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 20 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

HORT 8000. Horticultural Seminar. 1 hour. Repeat- 
able for maximum 2 hours credit. 
Papers on selected topics to be presented by advanced 
students, faculty members, and guest speakers. 

HORT 8080. Horticulture Research. 1-10 hours. 
This course is designed for graduate students who 
wish to carry out advanced research not covered in 
their thesis topic under the supervision of a faculty 
member. 

HORT 8130. Advanced Plant Nutrition. 4 hours. 3 
hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: (HORT 4110/6110 and BTNY 3830- 
3830L) or permission of department. 
The principles of plant nutrition, with emphasis on the 
theories of ion absorption, function of nutrient ions, 
and nutrient effects on plant composition. 

HORT 8150. Growth and Development of Horti- 
cultural Crops. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: BTNY 3830-3830L or permission of de- 
partment. 

Growth and development of economic plants. The 
physiological processes of growth, translocation, 
growth regulators, juvenility, maturity, senescence. 
Floral initiation and development of economic plants, 
with emphasis on the physiological processes of 
growth, translocation, growth regulators, juvenility, 
maturity, senescence, floral initiation and develop- 
ment, fruiting, tuber and bulb formation, vernalization, 
dormancy, rest, and seed germination. 

HORT 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-12 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 35 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

HORT 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 hours Re 
peatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Plant Pathology 

John L. Sherwood, Head 

Charles W. Mims, Graduate Coordinator. 

542-1291 
(Plant Sciences Building) 

Plant pathology offers three graduate programs: 
MS, PhD, and a professional Master of Plant 



Protection and Pest Management degree 
(MPPPM). The department has a strong tradition 
in scholarship and has an international reputa- 
tion for research on diseases of apples, cotton, 
cowpeas, peaches, peanuts, pecans, small grains, 
soybeans, tobacco, and vegetables. Currently, 
active research and teaching programs are being 
conducted in all major areas of plant pathology 
involving many different crops. 

The MS and PhD degrees are traditional aca- 
demic degree programs which demand creative 
scholarship, technologic skill, and philosophic 
soundness. These programs emphasize the de- 
velopment of scientists who have the ability to 
fill positions of leadership in teaching, research, 
and administration. To achieve such goals of ex- 
cellence, the student must be highly motivated 
and must make a commitment to the under- 
standing of plant pathology so that biological 
principles can be developed and applied. Stu- 
dents may specialize in general plant pathology, 
mycology, bacteriology, nematology, virology, 
physiology, genetics, or epidemiology. The 
MPPPM program is designed to produce gradu- 
ates with comprehensive, multidisciplinary 
training in plant pathology, entomology, and 
agronomy. 

Doctoral research skills requirement: one of 
the three following options, with a decision of 
which option to require being left to the discre- 
tion of the student's advisory committee, (1) sta- 
tistics, (2) computer science, and (3) reading 
knowledge of a foreign language. 

The Department of Plant Pathology has fac- 
ulty located in Athens, Tifton and Griffin. All 
three locations are well equipped with modern 
instrumentation, greenhouses, and other facili- 
ties for graduate research. Land for field studies 
is located at main and branch experiment sta- 
tions at several locations throughout Georgia in 
different climatic regions and major crop grow- 
ing areas. A Plant Disease Clinic operated by the 
Extension Plant Pathology Department is used 
to give students practical training in disease di- 
agnosis and control. 

Prospective students who are interested in fi- 
nancial aid should file an application with the 
department; they will be considered for an) 
Graduate School. College of Agricultural and 
Environmental Sciences, or department assist- 

antship for which the) are eligible. 

PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-42001 V6200I.. lntrodur- 
tor> M y cology. ; hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (BTNY I210-1210L and 
BTNY i:2()-i:2()l. I or (BIOL 1103-11031 and BIOL 



Graduate School Descripti 109 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



1 104-1 104L) or (BIOL 1107-1107L and BIOL 1108- 
1108L). 

Morphology, biology, and taxonomy of fungi. Repre- 
sentatives of all major groups of fungi are considered. 

PATH 4280/6280-4280L/6280L. Diagnosis and 
Management of Plant Diseases. 3 hours. 2 hours lec- 
ture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L. 
Development of fundamental and practical knowledge 
for identification and management of plant diseases. 

PATH 4300/6300. Clinical Plant Pathology. 2 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 4 hours lab 
per week. 

Not open to students with credit in PATH 8 1 60. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: PATH 3530-3530L. 
Supervised plant disease diagnosis experience within 
the Extension Plant Pathology Plant Disease Clinics. 
Students will learn techniques and procedures for di- 
agnosing plant diseases on ornamentals, turf, fruit, 
vegetables, and field crops. Students will keep a writ- 
ten record of the diseases diagnosed. 

PATH 6130. Internship in Plant Protection and 
Pest Management. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 

2 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Students will be involved and become familiar with 
the applied aspects of plant protection and pest man- 
agement. 

PATH 6250-6250L. Plant Nematology. 3 hours. 

2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L. 

Morphology and biology of plant parasitic nematodes. 
An introduction to nematology, with an emphasis on 
nematode morphology, nematode disease of plants, 
and nematode management. 

PATH 6290-6290L. Plant Pathogenic Bacteria. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L or MIBO 3500. 
Isolation, identification, inoculation, biology, and con- 
trol of plant pathogenic bacteria. 

PATH 6350-6350L. Plant Virology. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L and BTNY(CRSS) 
(BIOL) 4500/6500. 

Nature of plant viruses, replication and gene expres- 
sion, movement and host range, purification, serology, 
control, and resistance. 

PATH 7000. Master's Research. 19 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

PATH 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 

for maximum 45 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor. 



PATH 8000. Field Plant Pathology. 1 hour. Repeat- 
able for maximum 2 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L. 
Four day long field trip to various parts of the state to 
see and collect examples of plant diseases in the field 
on economically important crops in Georgia. 

PATH 8150. Plant Pathology Graduate Seminar. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 
Presentation of thesis and dissertation results and dis- 
cussion of papers and research topics in plant pathol- 
ogy. 

PATH 8160. Special Topics in Plant Pathology. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Advanced topics of current interest and importance in 
plant pathology. 

PATH 8200. Applied Mycology. 3 hours. 1 hour lec- 
ture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 
Fungi collected from various sources in nature will be 
brought into the laboratory for culture and/or preser- 
vation and subsequent identification using current tax- 
onomic literature. 

PATH(BTNY) 8210-8210L. Biology of Ascomy- 

cetes. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 

week. 

Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 

Comparative morphology of ascomycetes and their 

asexual stages; principles of taxonomy and training in 

identification. 

PATH 8310-8310L. Epidemiology of Plant Diseases. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L. 
Factors altering the course of disease epidemics in 
plant populations. Techniques for qualitative and 
quantitative measures of such factors will be empha- 
sized. 

(PATH)BTNY 8320-8320L. Zoosporic Fungi and 
Slime Molds. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab 
per week. 

Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 
Comparative biology of zoosporic fungi and slime 
molds as organisms. Topics include current research in 
morphology and development, phylogeny, physiology, 
ecology and the use of selected organisms as model 
systems. Laboratory will emphasize isolation and cul- 
tivation of these organisms and demonstration of their 
reproductive stages. 

(PATH)BTNY 8340-8340L. Experimental Mycol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 
Fungal biology and ecology and the use of fungi as ex- 
perimental organisms in the study of development and 
molecular biology and genetics. 

PATH 8400. Host-Pathogen Interactions. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: |PATH 3530-3530L and (BCMB 6000 or 
BTNY(CRSS)(BIOL) 4500/6500)] or permission of 
department. 



110 / The University of Georgia 



Poultry Science 



Principles of physiology and genetics of parasitism 
and disease resistance. Emphasis is placed upon how 
the genetic basis for host-pathogen compatibility and 
incompatibility is related to structural, physiological, 
and biochemical responses in diseased plants and to 
mechanisms of resistance. 

PATH 8410. Advanced Plant Disease Management. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PATH 3530-3530L. 
Chemical controls and application methods, biological 
control and ecology of plant pathogens, host resis- 
tance, cultural practices, pesticide resistance, disease 
forecasting and other decision aids, integrated disease 
management, and economic aspects of disease man- 
agement. 

(PATH)(BCMB)BTNY(GENE) 8960. Genetics of 
Yeast and Filamentous Fungi. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Classical genetics and molecular biology of budding 
yeast, fission yeast, and model filamentous fungi. In- 
cludes life cycle, cell cycle, cytoskeleton, mating 
types, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, mutant screens, 
and cloning strategies. 

PATH 9000. Doctoral Research. 1 -9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

PATH 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Poultry Science 



Henry L. Marks, Head 

Gene M. Pesti, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-1369 
(Linstock-Poultry Building) 

The Department of Poultry Science offers excel- 
lent opportunities for graduate study for quali- 
fied students with degrees in biology, chemistry, 
economics and poultry science. Graduate pro- 
grams leading to the MS and PhD degrees are 
offered in the fields of poultry products, nutri- 
tion, microbiology, molecular biology, mycotOX- 
icology, genetics, physiology, management, and 
parasitology. Facilities for graduate training 
include laboratories with the latest equipment 
for studies in cellular and molecular biology, 
enzymology, lipid and mineral metabolism, en- 
vironmental and reproductive physiology, phys- 



iological and population genetics and in avian 
diseases and parasites. 

Equipment is available for electrophoretic and 
chromatographic separation, fractionation 
procedures, and use of radioactive isotopes, in- 
cluding a whole body counter. Specialized 
equipment includes liquid scintillation detec- 
tors, spectrometers, cell culture incubators, 
ultracentrifuge, fluorescence microscopy, ther- 
mocyclers, amino acid analyzer, gas-liquid chro- 
matograph, high pressure chromatographs, and 
numerous other modern instruments. Excellent 
experimental poultry facilities are also available 
for studies, where large numbers of birds are re- 
quired for research in the various areas of spe- 
cialization in the graduate program, including a 
controlled temperature house for work in envi- 
ronmental physiology, and a sophisticated poul- 
try processing facility. 

Superior students are encouraged to apply for 
graduate assistantships and fellowships which 
are available through the department. 

The 8000 numbered courses in nutrition are 
listed in the offerings of animal nutrition. 

For a description of the MS and PhD interdis- 
ciplinary program in toxicology, see the section 
in this bulletin entitled, General Degrees: Inter- 
disciplinary Program. 

POUL 4050/6050. Advanced Poultry Breeding. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: POUL 3720. 
The development of practical poultry breeding pro- 
grams. The mode of inheritance and relative heritabil- 
ity of various characteristics of economic importance 
and criteria for effective selection toward their im- 
provement. 

POUL 4060/6060-4060L/6060L. Physiology of 
Avian Reproduction. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 
2 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1108-1 10SL. 
Lectures emphasize the reproductive physiology of 
poultry and integrate this information into manage- 
ment programs directed toward maximizing reproduc- 
tive efficiency. Laboratories will emphasize the 
acquisition ot skills and techniques in reproductive 
management, including the collection, preservation, 
and evaluation ol semen, fertility evaluation, and 
proper incubation practices. 

POLL 4330/6330. Basic Mycotoxfcology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Biol lios nosi. and 
(ill M 2100 and CHEM 2100L. 
Various mycotoxins winch occur in feedstuffs as the] 

relate to agricultural production. Fungal producers, 
chemical and physical properties ot the toxins, preva- 
lence and distribution in nature, biological effects and 

models i ot action, and means ot control 



Graduate School Descripi I 1 



The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 



(POUL)(ADSC)ANNU 4370/6370. Monogastric 

Nutrition. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [ADSC 3300-3300L or 

POUL 3750] and BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 

Comparative nutrition of monogastric animals, with 

special but not exclusive, consideration of poultry and 

swine. 

POUL(FDST) 4860L/6860L. Poultry Processing. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: POUL 3600 or FDST 
2010 or FDST 3000 or permission of department. 
Basic principles and methods of processing poultry 
and eggs. Broiler harvesting, slaughter, evisceration, 
plant sanitation, microbiology, inspection, grading, 
regulations, water and waste water handling, quality 
control and HACCP plans, further processing, and 
shell egg handling and processing. 

POUL 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

POUL 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 

for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 



POUL 8010-8010L. Avian Physiology. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The physiology of all organ systems of birds other 
than the reproductive system. In-depth study of avian 
systems will be done using current scientific literature 
and review articles as source material. 

POUL 8100. Poultry Science Seminar. 1 hour. Re- 
peatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 1 hour lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Reading, reports, and discussions of problems related 
to the field of poultry. 

POUL 8120. Scientific Writing and Literature Re- 
trieval. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Scientific writing and literature retrieval techniques in 
the life sciences. Library resources and their use 
through manual and automated retrieval systems and 
on practical aspects of oral and written communica- 
tions of scientific information. 

POUL 8150. Poultry Nutrition with Application to 
Avian Medicine. 1 hour. 
Prerequisite: POUL 3750 or ADSC 3300-3300L. 
The practical aspects of poultry nutrition and the rela- 
tionship of nutritional programs in poultry production 
to disease problems. 



POUL 8510. Problems in Poultry Science. 

1-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected problems in the specialized areas of poultry 
nutrition, genetics, physiology, poultry products tech- 
nology, pathology, parasitology, and management. 

(POUL)CBIO(PARA) 8560. Seminar in Parasitol- 
ogy. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 
1 hour lab per week. 
Weekly discussion of parasitological topics. 

(POUL)PHRM(VPHY) 8920. Organ Systems Toxi- 
cology II. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHRM(VPHY) 6910 or permission of 
department. 

Mechanisms of injury of biological systems produced 
by chemical exposure. Adverse effects of chemicals on 
major bodily organs and organ systems including the 
liver, carcinogenesis/mutagenesis, immune system, re- 
productive system, skin, and eyes. 

(POUL)(EHSC)PHRM(VPHY) 8930. Chemical 
Toxicology. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHRM(VPHY) 6910 or permission of 
department. 

Chemical contamination of air, water, and food by 
major agricultural and industrial chemicals. Emphasis 
will be placed on sources of contamination, fate of 
chemicals in the environment, target species, health ef- 
fects, chemical analyses, and contamination control. 

POUL 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

POUL 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



2 / The University of Georgia 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Wyatt W. Anderson, Dean 
(New College) 

The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, the oldest of the schools and colleges which make up the 
University of Georgia, offers masters and doctoral degrees in more than forty disciplines or areas of 
study within the humanities, fine arts, social sciences, and natural sciences. The degree offerings in- 
clude Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Applied Mathematical Science, Master of Arts for 
Teachers, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Music, Master of Public Administration, Doctor of Musical 
Arts, Doctor of Public Administration, and Doctor of Philosophy. Additionally, graduate certificates 
are available in conservation ecology and sustainable development, environmental ethics, geographic 
information science, global policy studies, and women's studies. 

Applications must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Admissions for these programs, but stu- 
dents should also seek information regarding entrance requirements, faculty research specialties 
within departments or programs, and graduate assistantships from the graduate coordinator s) of any 
program(s) in which they have interest. The names of the department heads and graduate coordinators, 
course offerings and additional information are also found in this bulletin. 



African American 
Studies 



R. Baxter Miller, Director 

Institute for African American Studies, 

542-5197 
(Psychology Building) 

The Institute currently arranges for collaborative 
graduate work with the departments of adult ed- 
ucation, comparative literature, drama, English, 
history, political science, psychology, Romance 
languages, and sociology. Please consult any 
joint listings in the areas. Flexibly coherent pro- 
grams should demonstrate disciplinary rigor 
along with brave new inquiries into fresh meth- 
ods of scholarly integration. The Institute works 
especially to facilitate and authorize interdisci- 
plinary options for diverse African Americanists 
of all kinds. 

(AFAM)HIST 4055/6055. Historical Survey of 
African American Thought. 3 hours. 
This course examines representative works of such 
nineteenth- and twentieth-centuiv social, cultural, and 
political thinkers as Frederick Douglass. Cornel West. 
Anna J. Cooper, and Angela Davis among other out- 
standing women and men who have contributed sig- 
nificantly to the intellectual life ol the Atncan 
American community. 



(AFAM)RELI 4201/6201. African American Reli- 
gious History. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 
or permission of department. 

The religious traditions of African Americans from 
Colonial times to the present; major religious move- 
ments, personalities, and ideas and their relationship to 
various aspects of American culture. 

(AFAM)RELI 4202/6202. Southern Religious His- 
tory. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 
or permission of department. 

The origins, growth, and current practices of religion 
in the American South. The interaction between reli- 
gion and other aspects of Southern culture, such as 
racial and gender concerns, education. Darwinian sci- 
ence, temperance, and politics. 

(AFAM)RELI 4203/6203. The Bible in the Black 

Church. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

or permission of department. 

Biblical interpretation in black America from 1865 to 

the present. 

A FA M( DRAM) 4490/6490. African American 
Women in Cinema: Image and Aesthetics. ] hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission oi depart- 
ment. 

Selected films b\ and about African and African 
American women. A historical/critical overview of the 

presentation ol these women in cinema with emphasis 
00 contemporary Atncan and African American 
women film makers 



Graduate St hoot Dest option <>t Courses 1 13 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



AFAM(PSYC) 4500/6500. Psychology of Prejudice. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (PSYC 1101 or SOCI 

1 101) and senior standing. 

Motivational, cognitive, social, and cultural factors 

that lead to discrimination in our society and various 

perspectives found in the research on discrimination. 

AFAM(PSYC) 4550/6550. Classic Studies in Black 
Psychology. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: AFAM(PSYC) 3150 or 
permission of department. 

Studies which have had major social or scientific im- 
pact on the lives of Black Americans and the way 
black people have been viewed within psychology. 
Approach is historical and interdisciplinary. 

(AFAM)SPCM 4830/6830. African American Rela- 
tional Communication. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: SPCM 
1500 or SPCM 3700 or AFAM 2000 or PSYC(AFAM) 
2150 or AFAM(PSYC) 3150. 

Interpersonal communication within African Ameri- 
can relationships from a holistic framework. Histori- 
cal, sociological, and psychological factors that affect 
individual behaviors within these relationships, in- 
cluding gender socialization from Africa to America. 

AFAM(ROML) 4860/6860. Topics in Afro-Hispanic 
Identity. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Representations of Africa and African American cul- 
ture in Hispanic Literature by writers of African de- 
scent. By covering a variety of genres, the course will 
provide discussion about a cultural identity that is con- 
stantly in dialogue with dominant discourses. The 
course will incorporate critical texts. 

(AFAM)ENGL(LING) 6040. Language Use in the 
African American Community. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
History and structure of the speech and language styles 
used in the African American community; examina- 
tion of linguistic and cultural issues that confront the 
majority of African Americans; the role of the vernac- 
ular language of African Americans in society. 

(AFAM)SOCI 6370. Sociology of Race and Ethnic- 
ity. 3 hours. 

The relationships of racial and ethnic groups with each 
other and with social institutions and processes. 

(AFAM)ENGL 6770. Topics in African American 

Literature. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Selected topics in African American literature, such as 

autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, Gwendolyn 

Brooks and Richard Wright, Black American literature 

and aesthetics. 



(AFAM)ENGL 8720. Seminar in African American 

Literature. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

A detailed examination of selected forms and ideas in 

the African American tradition. 

AFAM 8960. Directed Reading in African Ameri- 
can Studies. 3-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Independent directed reading course for graduate stu- 
dents whose programs of study require courses not! 
available in the regular schedule. It makes the inter- 
disciplinary study of African American culture and 
theory accessible to students who in traditional depart- 
ments need to ground their inquiry in a broader con- 
text. 



Anthropology 



James A. Whitney, Interim Head 
David J. Hally, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-3962 
(Baldwin Hall) 

The Department of Anthropology offers pro- 
grams leading to the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy in anthropology. 
These graduate programs reflect training 
basic anthropological knowledge and the depart- 
ment's focus on environmental and ecological 
anthropology. 

Admission is only to the PhD program. Stu- 
dents may complete the requirements for an MA 
degree en route to the PhD or as the terminal de- 
gree in their program. Students are admitted and 
begin the PhD program only during Fall semes- 
ter. No new admissions are permitted in the 
Spring semester. 

Training focuses on the role of anthropology 
as a discipline in understanding the human-envi- 
ronment interface, both past and present, and 
from a cross-cultural perspective. The doctoral 
program also provides students with the flexibil- 
ity to attain interdisciplinary training in other 
academic areas relevant to understanding issues 
of sustainable human ecosystems. Relevant aca- 
demic areas for coursework within the univer- 
sity can be found in the Institute of Ecology, the 
Environmental Ethics Program, the College of 
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the 
School of Forest Resources, and allied disci- 
plines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Grad- 
uates of the program should be qualified for 
teaching, research, or applied employment op- 



14 / The University of Georgi 



portunities. Requirements for the PhD degree in- 
clude satisfactory performance on written and 
oral comprehensive examinations, fulfillment of 
a research skills requirement, and an approved 
dissertation which reflects the student's special- 
ization and the departmental focus. 

Prospective students must complete the appli- 
cation process by January 14. 

(Please contact the graduate coordinator for 
current course offerings.) 

ANTH 4000/6000. Anthropology of Economic Sys- 
tems. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Models and methods used by anthropologists to study 
production, distribution, and consumption of goods in 
subsistence and market economies. Topics from the 
ethnographic literature include feasting, money, man- 
aging commons, pre-capitalist markets, and capitalist 
penetration of subsistence economies. 

ANTH 4020/6020. Indians of North America. 

3 hours. 

North American Indian cultures at the time of Euro- 
pean contact. Additional topics include origin and de- 
velopment of Indian culture, impact of European 
contact on native cultures, and problems faced by Na- 
tive Americans today. 

ANTH 4040/6040. Visual Anthropology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Anthropological uses of film, video, and photographs 
in field research and in the presentation of research re- 
sults, especially in relation to portrayal of indigenous 
people. 

ANTH 4050/6050. Cultural Anthropology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

The analysis and cross-cultural comparison of human 
institutions. 

ANTH(LING) 4090/6090. Cognitive Anthropology. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Folk systems of knowledge, with an emphasis on how 
people in different societies culturally identify, define. 
label, and classify phenomena such as color terms, 
plants, animals, and other environmental resources. 

ANTH 4200/6200. Field Methods in Archaeology. 

3-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Undergraduate eorequisite: ANTH 4240/6240. 
Archaeological reconnaissance, survey, excavation, lab- 
oratory preparation and analysis of collected materials. 

ANTH(ECOL) 4210/6210. Zooarchaeology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite ANTH 1102 or BIOI 
1 104-1 104L or BIOL 1 108-1 10KL or permission ol 
major. 



Anthropology 



Animal remains recovered from archaeological sites, 
studied in light of zoological and archaeological meth- 
ods and theories and interpreted in terms of human and 
animal behavior. 

ANTH 4240/6240. Laboratory Methods in Archae- 
ology. 3-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Undergraduate eorequisite: ANTH 4200/6200. 
Environmental, chronological, preservational, and an- 
alytical methods and techniques of archaeological re- 
search. 

ANTH(ECOL) 4290/6290. Environmental Archae- 
ology. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 1 hour lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Prehistoric and historic human subsistence patterns 
through the methods and techniques of zooarchaeol- 
ogy, paleobotany, and paleonutrition. Theories of envi- 
ronmental reconstruction. 

ANTH(BTNY) 4300/6300-4300L/6300L. Ethnob- 
otany. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Ethnobotanical research, with focus on knowledge and 
utilization of the plant world in traditional societies. 
Comparisons of societies in tropical forest ecosystems 
and evaluation of issues relating to intellectual prop- 
erty rights and traditional peoples' knowledge of plant 
species with potential economic value. 

ANTH 4310/6310. Archaeology of Eastern North 
America. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 3220 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Prehistoric and early historic aboriginal cultural varia- 
tion in Eastern North America. 

(ANTH)GEOL 4340/6340. Archaeometry. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL(ANTH) 4700/ 
6700. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or eorequisite: GEOL 
1121 or GEOL 11 21 H or GEOL 11 22 or GEOL 2350H 
or ANTH 3220 or ANTH 3250 or ANTH(ECOL) 
42 1 0/62 1 or CL AS( ANTH ) 2000. 
Methods of archaeometric analysis including chrono- 
DietriG and instrumental techniques. Absolute age dat- 
ing and Characterization of archaeological materials b\ 

physico-chemical analysis. 

ANTH 4540/6540-4540L/6540L. Environment and 
Health. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week 

Bio-cultural medical anthropology focusing on the in- 
teraction among environment, biology, culture, and so- 
ciel\ as determinants of health and health problems. 

WTH 4550*55* I thnohistorv 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite win 1102 or permis- 
sion ot major. 



Graduate Si hool Dexriptk I 1 5 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



The methods used by anthropologists to reconstruct 
the history of preliterate societies from archaeological 
evidence, documentary evidence, and oral traditions. 
The ethnohistory of southeastern United States. 

ANTH 4560/6560. Anthropology of Development. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Relationships among development, culture and envi- 
ronment from the world system perspective. Concepts 
of dependence, hegemony, inequality, and resistance 
are brought to bear in exploring interlinkages between 
(and among) underdevelopment, resource exploita- 
tion, and local autonomy and self-reliance. 

ANTH 4570/6570. Maritime Anthropology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Coastal and marine regions of the world in terms of 
human occupation, resource utilization, social organi- 
zation, and human-environmental relationships. Iden- 
tification of issues in traditional and contemporary 
management of coastal and marine ecosystems. 

ANTH 4580/6580-4580L/6580L. Ecology of Food, 
Diet, and Nutrition. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 
2 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

The impact of cultural behavior on the acquisition, 
preparation, and consumption of potentially edible 
natural resources. 

ANTH 4590/6590. Ecology and Evolution of 
Human Disease. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (ANTH 1102 and BIOL 
1 104-1 104L) or permission of major. 
Graduate prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or 
permission of major. 

Ecological, evolutionary, and biocultural aspects of 
human disease. Subjects include the ecology of infec- 
tious/parasitic disease pathogens and their human 
hosts, the evolution of human host-pathogen interac- 
tions, the impact of cultural and demographic change 
in human populations, and the effects of global envi- 
ronmental change on human disease patterns. 

ANTH 4630/6630. Field Methods in Cultural An- 
thropology. 6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 
hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 and permis- 
sion of major. 

Supervised research projects in a field setting. Individ- 
ual projects related to a central problem or issue, using 
research methods and techniques in cultural anthro- 
pology; interviews, surveys, participant-observation, 
and questionnaires are included. 

(ANTH)RELI 4640/6640. Anthropology of Reli- 
gion. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 
or permission of department. 



Anthropological approaches to the world's major reli- 
gions as they relate to complex societies. 

(ANTH)GEOL 4700/6700. Archaeological Geology. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (GEOL 1121 and GEOL 
1121L) or GEOL 1250-1250L or permission of de- 
partment. 

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth sci- 
ence methods and theories in the study of archaeolog- 
ical sites and their contents. The four major areas 
covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geol- 
ogy; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration 
techniques; (4) artifact characterization. 

ANTH 4710/6710-4710L/6710L. Human Origins. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 and permis- 
sion of major. 

The evolutionary history of the human species through 
examination of the fossil record. The fossil record is 
introduced using precision casts of fossil specimens. 
Scientific methods are developed by rediscovering 
major findings. The influence of changing interpreta- 
tions on the culture of science is demonstrated. 

ANTH 4790/6790. Human Adaptation. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 and permis- 
sion of major. 

Graduate prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Human diversity as response to environmental stress, 
from both a biological and cultural perspective. Topics 
include adaptation to heat, cold, altitude, malnutrition, 
and infectious disease; the impact of westernization 
and technological advancement on human biological 
function; and growth and development of the individ- 
ual under environmental stress. 

ANTH 4800/6800. Anthropological Approaches to 
Human Sexuality. 3 hours. 

Surveys contemporary understanding of human sexual 
behavior from diverse anthropological perspectives. 

(ANTH)LING 4860/6860. Sociolinguistics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The study of language as a cultural and social phe- 
nomenon. Topics include language and meaning, lan- 
guage and world view, language and social behavior, 
and language and social issues. 

ANTH 4900/6900. Special Topics in Anthropology. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 
Current topics in anthropology. 

(ANTH)CRSS(HORT) 4930/6930. Agriculture and 
Ecology in Tropical America. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Crops and cropping systems in tropical America; in- 
fluences of geography, climate, and socioeconomic 
factors, as well as the impact of agriculture, on the 
ecosystems of the region. 



16 / The University of Georgia 



(ANTH)CRSS(HORT) 4940/6940. Agriculture and 
Ecology in Tropical America Field Trip. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 48 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CRSS(HORT)(ANTH) 
4930/6930. 

Intensive field study in a tropical Latin American 
country; crops and cropping systems of tropical Amer- 
ica; influences of geography, climate, and socioeco- 
nomic factors, as well as the impact of agriculture on 
the ecosystems of the region. Conducted in a tropical 
Latin American country. 

(ANTH)ECOL(FORS) 6140. Principles of Conser- 
vation Ecology and Sustainable Development II. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ECOL 6080. 

Social science dimensions of conservation and sus- 
tainable development; social, economic, and political 
considerations in managing natural resources; policy- 
level aspects to project implementation. 

(ANTH)SOCI 6450. Sociopolitical Ecology. 3 hours. 
The relationship between humans and the environ- 
ment; ecological and social theories about environ- 
mental policies and problems. 

ANTH 6490. Foundations of Ecological Anthropol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Human-environment interaction in anthropological 
perspective from the eighteenth century to the present. 

ANTH 6520. History of Anthropological Theory. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

The development of anthropological theory. 

ANTH 6600. Microcomputers for Anthropological 
Research. 1 hour. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Microcomputer hardware and software packages for 
anthropological research. These include word process- 
ing, data management programs, and packages de- 
signed specifically for anthropology. 

ANTH 6610. Introduction to Research Methods. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Central issues, underlying assumptions, and basic 
premises of anthropology. Course provides the requi 
site skills and knowledge for designing an original re- 
search project in anthropolog) 

ANTH 6620. Methods in Sociocultural Anthropol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Research methods and techniques used in BOCiocul- 
tural anthropology, with emphasis on ethnographic 
field research, including observation, participant ob- 
servation, interviewing, questionnaires, testing, and 
mapping. Methods of data organization, storage, re 
trieval, and preliminary analyses. 



Anthropology 



ANTH 6920. Advanced Archaeology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Fundamental issues in modern archaeology. 

ANTH 6950. Advanced Cultural Anthropology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

Cultural and social anthropology. 

ANTH 6980. Advanced Biological Anthropology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

Current trends in bioanthropology. 

ANTH 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

(ANTH)EFND 7150. Anthropology of Education. 

3 hours. 

Cultural aspects of educational processes, institutions, 
and issues in societies around the world organized 
around comparative analysis. Topics include education 
as cultural process and social function, as sociocultural 
structure, as cultural transaction, and as cultural prod- 
uct. 

ANTH 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ANTH 8000. Special Topics in Anthropology. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Intensive study on an individual basis in the field of 
the graduate student's major interest. 

ANTH 8040. Seminar in Anthropology. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Selected topics in anthropology. 

ANTH 8060. Primate and Human Ecology. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

Interrelationships among biology, social organization, 

cultural diversity, and the physical environment Em- 
phasis is placed on the ecology ol human and primate 
societies that affect and constrain biocultural adapta- 
tion. 

(ANTH)KCOL 8110. Tropical Ecological and Cul- 
tural S> stems. 2 hours 
Prerequisite: ECOl (FORSX ANTH) 6140. 

Characteristics ol tropical ecosystems, tropical biolog- 
ical communities, and human cultures in the tropics; 
DOW the) dit'ter from those m the temperate /one. and 
the implications tor conservation and development 

ANTH 82(H). Seminar in \rrhacolog\. 3 hours Re 
peatable tor maximum 12 hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission o! majOJ 



Graduate School Description ofCoursei 117 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Areas of special interest in the field of archaeology. 
Topics to be selected according to need. 

(ANTH)MARS 8210. Topics in Coastal Marine Pol- 
icy. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or permission 
of department. 

Coastal marine policy approached from scientific, 
legal, and anthropological perspectives. This interdis- 
ciplinary course provides a general background in 
coastal policy, and uses a case study approach to ex- 
amine current topics in marine resource management. 
Topics include: coastal zone management, coastal 
groundwater supply, coastal fisheries, development in 
the coastal zone. 

ANTH 8400. Human Population Ecology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ANTH 6490 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Theoretical population ecology applied to human pop- 
ulations. Biocultural aspects and multiplicity of 
causality in discussion/assessment of topics such as: 
human demography and population regulation; disease 
ecology and epidemiology in human populations; in- 
terrelationships of human nutrition, social inequity, 
resource exploitation, and population mobility/ migra- 
tion/spatial organization. 

ANTH 8410. Comparative Human Ecological Sys- 
tems. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ANTH 6490 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Critical examination of concepts relevant to an eco- 
logical analysis of the formation, maintenance, and 
change of human social groups, considering in turn 
cultural, biocultural, structural, and neo-Marxist per- 
spectives. 

ANTH 8420. Human Ecosystem Evolution. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ANTH 6490 or permission of major. 
Evolutionary perspectives on the cultural and biocul- 
tural mediation of human-environment relations from 
the Plio-Pleistocene to the recent past, analyzed in 
terms of human ecosystem structures and functions, 
including cybernetics and flows of energy/matter and 
information; persistence and change as evolutionary 
and ecological concepts. 

ANTH 8500. Seminar in Ecological Anthropology. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: ANTH 6490 or permission of major. 
Topics in human environmental and ecological sys- 
tems, including factors that contribute to emergence 
and maintenance of those systems. 

ANTH 8510. Seminar in Human Behavior. 3 hours. 
Seminar exploring evolutionary approaches to human 
behavior. 

ANTH 8570. Economic Development and Health. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Interrelationship of development and medical plural- 
ism on international health from the colonial era to the 
present. 



ANTH 8590. Ecology of Health Research. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Anthropological contributions to understanding health 
and disease within a human ecological framework. 

ANTH 8610. Field Methods in Ecological Anthro- 
pology. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Methods of anthropological research in field settings 
on environmental and ecological questions and prob- 
lems, including ethnography, surveys, and formal 
measurement of resources. 

ANTH 8620. Anthropological Data Analysis. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ANTH 6610. 

Procedures and techniques of analysis on anthropolog- 
ical data, including microcomputer software data 
analysis packages, with focus on issues in qualitative 
research, including text analysis, pattern recognition, 
matrix displays, and data graphics, and on issues in 
quantitative research, including hypothesis and model 
testing. 

ANTH(LING) 8880. Field Methods in Linguistics. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

The techniques of recording and analyzing a foreign 

language by working directly with a native speaker. 

ANTH 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ANTH 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Art 



Carmon Colangelo, Director 

Joe E. Sanders, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-1624 
(Visual Arts Building) 

The Lamar Dodd School of Art offers programs 
for the Doctor of Philosophy in art, Master of 
Fine Arts, and Master of Art in art history, all or- 
ganized to develop the student's creative inde- 
pendence and professional capability as a 
producing artist, designer, and scholar in a total 
environment of living art. In conjunction with 
the College of Education, the School of Art of- 
fers programs in art education leading to the 
Master of Art Education, Specialist in Educa- 



118/ The University of Georgia 



ion, and Doctor of Education degrees. The 
jchool's philosophy particularly stresses that the 
ibove goals be met for the art educator who 
nust attain professional standards in the gradu- 
ate studio as well as in the classroom. 

Candidates for the PhD in art are required to 
iemonstrate competence in either history of art 
3r art education. When appropriate, a candi- 
iate's program of study may include courses in 
he theory and criticism of art and relevant areas 
)f study outside the School of Art. The research 
>kills requirement, in the history of art emphasis, 
s a reading knowledge of two foreign lan- 
guages. In the art education emphasis, the re- 
search skills requirement may be met by 
completing a minimum of three of the specified 
"esearch courses. Satisfactory completion of 
written and oral preliminary examinations, a dis- 
sertation demonstrating original research, and a 
final oral defense before an examining commit- 
ee of the faculty are also required. 

Students in the MA program in art history 
must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a for- 
eign language, pass a written general examina- 
:ion in art history, submit a thesis, and pass a 
final oral examination. 

Applicants are admitted to all semesters. 
However, priority will be given to those applica- 
ions completed no later than January 1st for the 
following three semesters. Applications for as- 
istantships should be made to the graduate co- 
Drdinator of the School of Art by January 1st for 
the fall semester. Information on additional fel- 
lowships may be obtained from the Office of 
Student Financial Aid. 

The Georgia Museum of Art is a significant 
resource for the School of Art. It has a major col- 
lection of American paintings and over 5000 
works on paper from all periods. The museum 
sponsors a full schedule of in-house and travel- 
ing exhibitions each year. 

The following review and evaluation proce- 
dures apply to all students enrolled in a program 
eading to the MFA degree in studio art: 

Upon completion of 1 8 semester hours of res- 
Bent graduate work, the student must pass an 
oral examination which, with supporting ac- 
tive studio work, will constitute an evaluation 
of his/her capability for continued enrollment in 
the MFA degree program. The evaluation will be 
conducted by a duly appointed faculty commit- 
tee, which will determine if the student will be 
(1) continued in the regular MFA program, or (2) 
required to complete additional work beyond the 
regular MFA requirements, lor the specific pur- 
pose of improving his/her skills, or (3) eoun- 



Art 



seled to withdraw from the MFA program and 
consider alternative educational goals. 

Students who successfully meet the require- 
ments for continued enrollment in the MFA de- 
gree program, will be required to arrange a 
public exhibition of creative studio work during 
the final semester of residence. The exhibition 
will be evaluated by faculty, who will determine 
if the exhibited work represents a satisfactory 
level of professional accomplishment by the 
candidate. Faculty approval of the exhibition is 
a requirement for graduation. 

Although some courses listed below have spe- 
cific prerequisites, instructors for graduate 
courses may waive some prerequisites if the stu- 
dent can demonstrate adequate training or expe- 
rience. Likewise, the instructor may advise a 
student to withdraw from the class due to inade- 
quate preparation or motivation. 

Art 

ARTS 4920/6920. Seminar in Contemporary Art. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100. 

Contemporary art from the point of view of studio 

artists. 

ARTS 6900. Professional Practices: The Business 
Side of Art. 3 hours. 

The business practices necessary for an exhibiting and 
practicing artist to survive in the contemporary art 
market. Assignments will focus on professional devel- 
opment. Each student will leave the class with a packet 
of material to approach galleries, museums, and other 
art centers for exhibitions. 

ARTS 7990. Teaching Practicum. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit, b hours lah per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Pedagogical readings related to art. 

ARTS 8100. Graduate Seminar in Art. 3 hours. 
3 hours lab per week. 

Consideration of current issues in art practice and the- 
ory. 

ARTS 8350. Aesthetics and Art Criticism. 3 hours. 

3 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

The theoT) and practice of analyzing, interpreting, and 

appraising. 

ARTS 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-12 hours. Repeat 

able lor maximum 30 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission ol department. 

Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 

the direction of faculty members. 



Graduate St lii«>l />< \< npu<<n oj Coarse 



W 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



ARTS 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 2 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Art History 



ARHI 4000/6000. Early Greek Art. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Vase painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
Geometric through the Archaic periods. 

ARHI 4010/6010. Classical and Hellenistic Greek 

Art. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 

of department. 

Sculpture, architecture, and some vase painting from 

the Classical and Hellenistic periods emphasizing 

major monuments, including the Temple of Zeus at 

Olympia, the Parthenon, and the Great Altar of Zeus 

and Athena at Pergamon. 

ARHI 4020/6020. Roman Art and Architecture. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Buildings and wall painting of Pompeii, Roman Re- 
publican portraiture, Imperial portraiture, and major 
buildings and their associated architectural sculpture 
located in Rome and other sites within the Empire. 

ARHI 4030/6030. Classical Tradition in the Visual 
Arts. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

The influence of classical antiquity on the art and ar- 
chitecture of post-classical eras tracing formal affini- 
ties and the myths of classical gods and heroes. 

ARHI 4100/6100. Early Medieval Art. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Architecture, sculpture, and painting in Western Eu- 
rope from the seventh through the eleventh centuries. 

ARHI 4110/6110. Romanesque Art. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Architecture, sculpture, and painting in Western Eu- 
rope of the eleventh and twelfth centuries with partic- 
ular emphasis on France. 

ARHI 4120/6120. Gothic Art. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Architecture, sculpture, and painting of the twelfth and 
thirteenth centuries in Europe with special emphasis 
on France. 

ARHI 4130/6130. Late Gothic Art in Italy. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 



Principal monuments and artists of the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries in Italy emphasizing figures such 
as Giotto, Duccio, Simone Martini, and Ambrogio 
Lorenzetti. 

ARHI 4200/6200. Early Renaissance in Italy. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Architecture, sculpture, and painting of the fifteentlr 
century focusing on Tuscany, and the emergence and 
development of the new art principles in Florence rep-' 
resented in the work of such artists as Masaccio,' 
Brunelleschi, Donatello, Alberti, Fra Angelico, Filip 
Lippi, Ghirlandaio, Pollaiuolo, and Botticelli. 



- 



ARHI 4210/6210. High Renaissance and Manne 

ism in Italy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 

of department. 

The climactic period of the Renaissance in Italy with: 

special emphasis on such key figures as Leonardo, 

Michelangelo, Raphael, Protormo, Rosso Fiorentino,; 

and Bronzino. 

ARHI 4220/6220. Northern Renaissance. 3 hours, j 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission! 
of department. 

Painting north of the Alps, primarily in Flanders andJ 
Germany from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century, < 
with special attention to the van Eycks, van der Wey-| 
den, Bosch, Durer, and Grunewald. 

ARHI 4290/6290. Renaissance and Baroque Sculp- 
ture. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission] 
of department. 

The development of period styles and an analysis of 
the role of function and tradition in European sculpture' 
for ca. 1260-1700, with special attention to the work of] 
Donatello, Michelangelo, and Bernini. 

ARHI 4300/6300. Italian Baroque Art and Archi- 
tecture. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Baroque art and architecture in Italy, with special er 
phasis on Rome, and such important figures as th 
Carracci, Caravaggio, Bernini, and Borromini. 

ARHI 4310/6310. Northern Baroque Art. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permissic 
of department. 
French and Dutch art of the seventeenth century wit 
emphasis on such key figures as Rubens, Velasquez 
Rembrandt, and Poussin. 

ARHI 4350/6350. Art and Architecture of the C it 
of Rome. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permissic 
of department. 

The continuity of an artistic tradition in relation to tl 
history of the seat of the Roman Empire, the Catholi 
Church, and modern Italy. Attention is given to spe- 
cific sites, artistic types, and public processions. 



120 / The University of Georgia 



Art 



ARHI 4400/6400. Romanticism and Neoclassicism. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

European art and architecture from ca. 1760 through 
1865 including the sublime, the beautiful, the pic- 
turesque, historical revivalism, exoticism, rationalism, 
and eclecticism. 

ARHI 4410/6410. American Art from Colonial Set- 
tlement through the Civil War. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

The formation of a national identity and assimilation 
of European styles in painting, sculpture, and cultural 
artifacts such as photographs and popular illustrations. 
Artists include, Copley, Peale, Allston, Cole, Church, 
Quidor, Mount, Bingham, Heade, Bierstadt, and 
Homer. 

ARHI 4420/6420. American Art of the Fin de 

Sie cle 1876-1913. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 

of department. 

The transition in American art from Victorianism to 

early Modernism in an age of science, progress and 

decay, tradition and ethnicity, motherhood and the 

"new woman." A key cultural referent will be the 

World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. 

ARHI 4440/6440. American Modernism 1900-1946. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

The creation of radical forms of artistic expression, 
and their seeming rejection by the Regionalists in rela- 
tion to two world wars, the modern city, the depres- 
sion, and revolutions in space, time, and technology. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the diverse group 
of artists mentored by Alfred Stieglitz. 

ARHI 4500/6500. Realism and Impressionism. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

The rise and development of naturalism in mid-nine- 
teenth-century art in Europe. 

ARHI 4510/6510. Modern Art in Europe from 1886 

to 1918. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 

of department. 

Painting and sculpture from Post-Impressionism to the 

end of World War I, the Cubo-Futurist revolution and 

approaches to expressionism and abstraction. 

ARHI 4520/6520. Spirituality in Modern Art. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 

of department. 

Myth and spirituality in the abstract art of the late 

nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as exemplified in 

Gauguin, Kandinsky, Klee. Brancusi. Pollock, ami 

Rothko, among others 



ARHI 4540/6540. European Art Between the Great 
Wars. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

High modernism in the twentieth century. Topics in- 
clude Dada, Constructivism, Surrealism, the Bauhaus, 
and other major trends between the two World Wars. 

ARHI 4550/6550. Art Since 1945. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 
Major artists and movements in art after 1945. 

ARHI 4600/6600. Art of India. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Traditional art of India from the Indus valley civiliza- 
tion to the Muslim conquest. Major monuments of ar- 
chitecture, sculpture, and painting are investigated in 
the context of political and religious developments in 
the Indian subcontinent, including influences of the 
Indie religions of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism. 

ARHI 4610/6610. Arts of China. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Major trends in the arts of China from the Neolithic 
age to the eve of the modern period, ca. 2500 BCE to 
the nineteenth century CE. Factors affecting important 
developments in style and subject matter will be stud- 
ied in the context of contemporary cultural phenom- 
ena. 

ARHI 4620/6620. Japanese Art. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

History of Japanese art of the proto-historic period to 
the exposure of Japan to the West in the mid-nine- 
teenth century. The Buddhist arts of Japan during the 
imperial period, the evolution of Japanese pictorial art. 
religious and secular architecture, and Shinto-influ- 
enced arts. 

ARHI 4700/6700. Guided Foreign Study. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Travel to selected works in foreign collections, and 
sites. Local library, archival resources used. Prepara- 
tory and on-site lecture and discussion. 

ARHI 4710/6710. Guided Foreign Study. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 47(K)/67(K). 
Various topics related to Italian art. 

ARHI 4900/6900. Topics in Ancient and Medieval 

Art. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 OT permission 

o! department. 

Particular topics in Ancient and Medieval an and ar- 
chitecture treated in depth. 

ARHI 4910/6910. Topics in Renaissance and Baroque 

Art. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite \RHi 2100 or permission 

Of department. 



Graduate School Description qfG l/JW 121 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Particular topics in Renaissance and Baroque art and 
architecture treated in depth. 

ARHI 4920/6920. Topics in Modern Art. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Particular topics in modern art and architecture from 
Europe or America treated in depth. 

ARHI 4930/6930. Topics in Asian or Non-Western 
Art. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 
of department. 

Particular topics in Asian and non-western art and ar- 
chitecture treated in depth. 

ARHI 4940/6940. Gender Issues and Art History. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARHI 2100 or permission 

of department. 

The impact of feminist theory and gay and lesbian 

studies on recent art historical scholarship. 

ARHI 4950/6950. Independent Study. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Special projects in fields in which the student has 
demonstrated the ability to conduct research and write 
a fully and correctly annotated paper. 

ARHI 6005. Processes and Principles: Italian Art 
and Architecture. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Through lectures and site visits in Italy, students will 
consider the materials, methods, and meaning of Ital- 
ian art. Each semester a series of important monu- 
ments of painting, sculpture, and architecture will be 
studied both as significant examples of trends in the 
history of art and as demonstrations of the various 
techniques employed. 

ARHI 7000. Master's Research. 1 -12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ARHI 7040. Art History Methodology. 1 hour 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Art historical methodologies as they developed from 
the Renaissance to the present and as they are cur- 
rently employed in the diverse fields and periods of art 
history. Students will work with the entire art history 
faculty in the presentation of different methodologies. 

ARHI 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-12 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor 

ARHI 8110. Special Problems in Art History. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 



122 / The University of Gt 



Individual research and/or group presentation and dis- 
cussion of specific problems. 

ARHI 8120. Directed Study in Art History. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Individual research related to specific problems. 






ARHI 8580. Seminar in Renaissance Art. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in European art during the Renaissance. 
May include topics oriented toward a single major fig- 
ure, a genre, or a school. Problems concern a major 
branch of art history, e.g., connoisseurship or iconog- 
raphy. 

ARHI 8600. Seminar in Italian Baroque Art. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Focus on a single Italian Baroque artist, or on a re- 
gional school. Works of art and relevant literature pro- 
vide materials for training in how to solve art historical 
problems using techniques developed in connisseur- 
ship, iconography, and source material interpretation. 

ARHI 8700. Seminar in Greco-Roman Art. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Focus on a single genre of Greco-Roman art (e.g., 
freestanding Greek sculpture from the sixth century 
B.C.), or on a single aspect (e.g., Roman historical re- 
liefs). 

ARHI 8870. Seminar in Asian Art. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research topics may include Hindu iconography, Chi- 
nese painting, pan-Asian Buddhist iconography, the 
Hindu temple, and others. 

ARHI 8910. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Euro- 
pean Art History. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Issues relating to the visual arts. Studies of major 
artists or movements, and thematically directed pro- 
jects. 

ARHI 8920. Seminar in Twentieth-Century Art 

History. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Issues relating to the visual arts. Topical studies of 

major artists or movements, and thematically directed 

projects. 

ARHI 8990. Seminar in the American Art. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Topical studies of major artists, exhibitions, move- 
ments, or cultural productions significant to the devel- 
opment of American art. 



Art 



Art Interior Design 

\RID 4150/6150. Special Topics in Interior Design. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ARID 3110 and ARID 
3310 and ARID 3410 and permission of major. 
Special topics for advanced students with a formal 
written and/or graphic presentation of the results. 

\RID 4350/6350. Interior Design Practicum. 

1-3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARID 3110 and ARID 
3310 and ARID 3410 and permission of major. 
Individualized projects arranged with clients to ex- 
plore various aspects of the interior design profession. 

ARID 7890. Interior Design I. 3 hours. 6 hours lab 

per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Special problems in the planning of architectural 

spaces for public and residential uses. 

ARID 7900. Interior Design II. 3 hours. 6 hours lab 

r week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The designing of special equipment: furniture, built-in 
equipment, special lighting, and custom design. 

ARID 7910. Interior Design III. 3 hours. 6 hours lab 
r week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department, 
ndividual creative problems and coordination of spe- 
:ial aspects of interiors from concept to construction 

documentation and presentation. 

ARID 7920. Procedures in Interior Design. 3 hours. 
6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The procedures and practice of interior design prob- 
lem-solving with emphasis on research methodolo- 
gies. 

Studio Art 

ARST 4330/6330. Printmaking: Special Topics I. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Not open to students with credit in ARST 3330. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARST 2310 and ARST 

3300 and ARST 3310 and ARST 3320. 

Special projects for advanced students 

ARST 4340/6340. Special Topics II: Printmaking. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 

Not open to students with credit in ARST 3390; 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARST 4330/6 

Special topics for advanced students stressing aes 

thetic development with further technical instruction 

ARST 4730/6730. Fabric Design in Japan. 3 hours 

6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission ol major. 



Study program in Japan incorporating intensive studio 
work and field trips to collections and sites. 

ARST 4800/6800. Special Topics in Computer Art. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 6 
hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Computer-generated art and design including ad- 
vanced computer generated imaging, computer aided 
drafting, scanned image manipulation, animation, 
desktop publishing and presentation, and two-dimen- 
sional and three-dimensional representation of fiber 
and sculpture arts. 

ARST 4810/6810. Three-Dimensional Computer 
Art. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
6 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARST 4800/6800 and 
permission of major. 

Three-dimensional, computer-generated art using 
modelling, rendering, animation, and output tech- 
nique. 

ARST 4820/6820. Computer Aided Design. 3 hours 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ARST 4800/6800. 
Contemporary concepts and trends in art computing. 
The development and presentation of a substantial 
body of individual imagery is a major aspect of the 
course. 

ARST 4910/6910. Aspects of Folk Culture. 3 hours. 
Art of folk, self-taught, and visionary artists as distinct 
from mainstream and academic traditions. 

ARST 6020. Figure Drawing/Anatomy. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 3000. 

Figure drawing with consideration of the human skele- 
tal and muscular systems, surface anatomy, and bio- 
mechanical concerns. 

ARST 6160. Painting Materials and Techniques. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 

Historical techniques such as egg tempera, fresco, en- 
caustic, and Venetian mode oil painting as they apply 
to contemporary needs; modern materials such as 
alkyd and polymer resins are introduced Considera- 
tion is given to the properties of pigments, binders, 
grounds, and supports. 

ARST 6210. Color Photography. 3 hours 6 hours lab 
per week. 

fundamentals of color photography, including color 
theory, color temperature, lighting, and color printing. 
Concepts arc presented in the context of contemporar\ 
trends and practices. 

ARST 6220. Medium and Large Format. ! hours 
6 hours lab per week. 

Medium and large formal cameras using roll. pack, 
and sheet films, techniques Of advanced camera han- 



Gradttau School Description of ( L23 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



dling, lighting, film processing, and refined printing. 
Historical and contemporary practices considered. 

ARST 6230. Internship in Photography. 2-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: ARST 2200. 

Practical experience with professionals, including 
photographers, designers, and computer specialists. 
Independent projects and research with editors, cura- 
tors, teachers, and historians. Assist photography fac- 
ulty in creative work with emphasis on studio and lab 
production. 

ARST 7000. Master's Research. 1-3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 1 2 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ARST 7020. Drawing and Composition. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

Projects in drawing including individual and group 

critiques. 

ARST 7030. Drawing and Composition. 3 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 6 hours lab 

per week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7020. 

A continuation of Drawing and Composition. Projects 

in drawing, including individual and group critiques. 

ARST 7040. Drawing and Composition. 3 hours. 
6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ARST 7030. 

Studio work in drawing, with consideration of rela- 
tionship of principles to picture structure. Readings in 
art history and criticism. 

ARST 7110. Painting. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

Projects in painting, including individual and group 

critiques. 

ARST 7120. Painting. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 1 2 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ARST 71 10. 

A continuation of Painting. Projects in painting, indi- 
vidual and group critiques. 

ARST 7130. Painting. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Studio work in painting with consideration of theoret- 
ical issues. Readings in art criticism and aesthetics. 

ARST 7200. Photography. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per 

week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 6210 and ARST 6220. 

Advanced applications of the medium. Experimental 

camera handling and laboratory work is emphasized. 

Intensive practice of traditional and new technologies 

from the phoram to the electronic image. 

ARST 7210. Special Topics in Photography. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 6210 and ARST 6220. 



Major historical movements in photography, including 
comparative studies of contemporary trends and criti- 
cism with an emphasis on research and the develop- 
ment of library archives. 

ARST 7230. Graduate Photography I. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7200. 

Practice of the photographic medium. Emphasis is 

placed on learning advanced techniques in the context 

of artistic expression. 

ARST 7240. Graduate Photography II. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7230. 

A continuation of Graduate Photography I. Emphasis 

is placed on the proposal of art projects to be worked 

on in preparation for graduate exit studio. 

ARST 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ARST 7310. Book Art and Papermaking. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 6 hours lab 
per week. 

Hand papermaking as a support for other media and as 
a creative medium in two- or three-dimensional form. 
The book is examined in structure and content with 
skills learned in various binding techniques. 

ARST 7320. Book Art and Letterpress. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Hand printing and letterpress synthesizing text and 
image in a narrative, serial, sequential, or experimen- 
tal fashion. The book as a multiple is examined in 
structure and content with skills learned in binding and 
printing techniques. 

ARST 7330. Advanced Printmaking. 3 hours. Re- '■ 

peatable for maximum 18 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 

week. 

Advanced work in printmaking media, including the 

traditional intaglio processes; the various relief and 

planographic processes, and the combination of these 

various processes. 

ARST 7410. Advanced Figure and Portrait Study 
in Sculpture. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Advanced figure modeling. Working from the model, 
emphasizing the structural and sculptural aspects of ' 
form. Anatomy and anatomical forms stressed. 

ARST 7420. Sculpture Materials. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Formal three-dimensional concepts of sculpture ap- 
plied to material or combinations of materials. In- 
depth work in cast bronze, cast cement, direct plast 



124 / The University of Georgia 



direct cement, fire clay, welded metal, stone, and 
wood. 

ARST 7430. Construction Composition-Advanced 
Techniques in Metalcasting. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 9 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Production of wax models, venting, investing, casting, 
chasing, and mounting of finished work. Independent 
experimentation and study in cast bronze sculpture. 

ARST 7500. Ceramics. 3 hours. Repeatable for max- 
imum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Experimentation with ceramic forms, glazes, and fir- 
ing techniques. 

ARST 7510. Technical Problems in Ceramics. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ARST 7500. 

Individual research in clay, glaze, and firing tech- 
niques directed towards personal style. 

ARST 7520. Individual Research in Ceramics. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7510. 

Second year student begins to focus on individual 

style and cohesive, unified statement. Innovation in 

ceramic forms, glazes, and firing techniques. 

ARST 7530. Individual Research in Ceramics. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7520. 

Refinement of ceramic techniques in form and surface 

elaboration with emphasis on individual style work 

that will become the M.F.A. final exhibition. 

ARST 7620. Jewelry and Metalwork. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Properties of various metals and how they relate to 

processes and function of form and aesthetics. 

ARST 7630. Jewelry. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 9 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Jewelry making processes and development of indi- 
vidual interpretations of those processes and products. 

ARST 7640. Metalwork. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in design, forming, and constructing of met- 
als, including copper, silver, and gold. Independent 
study and research for solutions to design problems. 

ARST 7650. Metalwork. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7640. 

Design problems related to form and function with at- 
tention to surface embellishment and forming tech- 
niques. 



Art 



ARST 7700. Fabric Design-Structure. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 2 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in fabric structure for independent study. Re- 
search combining process with design. 

ARST 7710. Fabric Design-Surface. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 2 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in fabric decoration for independent study. 
Research technology combining dye, fiber, and appli- 
cation process with design and function or selection. 

ARST 7750. History of Fabric Design. 3 hours. 
6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Development of the fabric arts from prehistoric peri- 
ods to the present in conjunction with studio projects. 

ARST 7760. Japanese Fabrics. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Japanese fabrics in a historical and cultural context 
and their application to contemporary fiber art in con- 
junction with studio projects. 

ARST 7770. Peruvian Fabrics. 3 hours. 6 hours lab 
per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
Peruvian fabrics in historical and cultural context and 
their application to contemporary fiber art in conjunc- 
tion with studio projects. 

ARST 7980. Directed Study in Major Studio Area. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Individual studio projects and investigation of specific 
problems under the direction of faculty members. 

ARST 8000. General Art. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: ARST 7980 and permission of depart- 
ment. 

Individual projects in drawing, painting, sculpture, 
jewelry and metalwork, fabric design, ceramics. 
and/or mixed media. 

ARST 8010. General Art. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARST 7980 and permission of depart- 
ment 

Individual projects in drawing, painting, sculpture, 
jewelry and metalwork, fabric design, ceramics, 
and/or mixed media 

ARST 9210. Graduate Kxit Studio. 3 hours Repeat 

able tor maximum 12 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Project of original creative works of high professional 

standards, together with a written report in which use 
is made of photographs or drawings or both and a 

comprehensive exhibition of creative work. 



Graduate School Description of Count 125 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Artificial Intelligence 



Donald E. Nute, Jr., Program Director 
Walter D. Potter, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0361 
(Boyd Graduate Studies Building) 

The interdisciplinary Master of Science program 
in artificial intelligence is intended to prepare 
students for careers as developers of artificial in- 
telligence applications or for further graduate 
work in artificial intelligence or related areas. 
The program includes foundational courses in 
computer science, linguistics, logic, philosophy, 
and psychology as well as specialized courses in 
artificial intelligence programming languages 
and techniques. Seminars emphasize knowledge 
based systems, natural language understanding, 
and logic programming. 

Students are admitted to the program with de- 
grees in many areas including business, com- 
puter science, education, linguistics, philosophy, 
and psychology. A liberal undergraduate educa- 
tion with some previous experience in comput- 
ing is desirable. Most students must take a few 
undergraduate courses to satisfy prerequisites 
for required graduate courses. The required 
graduate courses are listed under their respective 
departments. Typically, required courses in- 
clude: symbolic programming, artificial intelli- 
gence, symbolic logic, logic programming, and 
any two from knowledge based systems, 
computational intelligence, natural language 
processing, and computer vision/pattern recog- 
nition. Additional course requirements are satis- 
fied by selecting optional courses. It normally 
takes two years to complete all prerequisites, all 
required courses, and the thesis. 

A limited number of research assistantships 
are available. Prospective students who desire 
financial aid should apply to the graduate coor- 
dinator. 

(ARTI)CSCI 4540/6540. Symbolic Programming. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1302 or permission of department. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: CSCI(PHIL) 4550/65.50. 
Programming in LISP and PROLOG, with emphasis 
on artificial intelligence techniques. Other languages 
used for artificial intelligence work will be presented 
more briefly. 

ARTI 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeal 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 



Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ARTI 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ARTI 8000. Topics in Artificial Intelligence. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Special topics in artificial intelligence. Topics will 
vary. Consult the program director for the specific top- 
ics to be offered in a given year. 

ARTI 8800. Directed Readings in Artificial Intelli- 
gence. 1-5 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Directed reading and research in artificial intelligence | 
in area of student's special interest. 



Biochemistry and 
Molecular Biology 



J. David Puett, Head 

Alan E. Przybyla, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-1728 
(Life Sciences Building) 

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular 
Biology is in the Franklin College of Arts and 
Sciences. It functions largely as a graduate de- 
partment with programs of study leading to the . 
MS and PhD degrees. There are 20 large re- j 
search laboratories for biochemistry and molec- j 
ular biology in the Life Sciences Building, a $36 I 
million facility completed in 1991. The building 
houses a fermentation plant with facilities for] 
the large-scale production and processing of mi 
croorganisms, animal quarters and a large suite 
of plant growth chambers giving the department 
facilities to work with any type organism. Sev- 
eral faculty members have labs in the Complex 
Carbohydrate Research Center, which is housed 
in a $10 million research building and is cur- 
rently composed of six faculty members and 100 
support personnel. 

The research laboratories are equipped with 
most of the specialized equipment required for 
modern biochemical research including auto- 
mated amino acid analyzers, analytical and 
preparative ultracentrifuges, liquid scintillation 
counters, recording spectrophotometers, spec- 
trofluorimeters and stopped-flow devices, elec- 



26 / The University of Georgia 



Artificial Intelligence • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 



tron paramagnetic resonance spectrometers, x- 
ray diffraction facilities, mass spectrometers, 
protein sequenators, DNA synthesizers, HPLCs, 
mini-computers and other specialized equip- 
ment. 

Graduate students are usually admitted at the 
beginning of fall semester, but in special cases a 
student with previous experience may be admit- 
ted in January. Deadline for most fellowships 
and assistantships is January 15, but exceptional 
qualifications may lead to awards at other times. 

In addition to the courses listed below, a num- 
ber of interdisciplinary courses such as Nucleic 
Acids (GENE 8920) and Molecular Genetics 
(GENE 8930) are offered to interested students 
in the biochemistry and molecular biology grad- 
uate program. The listings in biology, botany, 
cellular biology, genetics, and microbiology 
should be consulted to determine the range of 
courses available to graduate students majoring 
in biochemistry and molecular biology. One 
year of a foreign language at the high school or 
college level is required for a master or doctoral 
degree. 

BCMB 4010/6010. Biochemistry and Molecular Bi- 
ology I. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 
2211L. 

A comprehensive treatment of biochemistry and mol- 
ecular biology stressing structures of biological mole- 
cules, including proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, 
and lipids, enzymology and selected aspects of metab- 
olism and bioenergetics. 

BCMB 4020/6020. Biochemistry and Molecular Bi- 
ology II. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 or BCMB 4010/6010. 

A comprehensive treatment of biochemistry and mol- 
ecular biology stressing aspects of metabolism, meta- 
bolic regulation, bioenergetics, and recombinant DNA 
methodologies. 

BCMB 4030L/6030L. Laboratory Techniques in 
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 3 hours. 
1 hour lecture and 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(B!OL)(CHEM) 
3 100 or BCMB 40 10/60 10. 

Basic techniques in biochemistry and molecular biol- 
ogy, including enzyme assays and purification, nucleic 
acid purification and characterization, chromatogra- 
phy, spectroscopy, and other modern methods. 

BCMB(CHEM) 4110/6110. Physical Biochemistry. 

3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2210. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: BCMB 

(BIOD(CHEM) 3100 or BCMB 4010/601 or PHYS 

1112-1112LorPHYS 1212-12121 

The principles of physical chemistry applied to bio- 



logical molecules and systems, including current ap- 
proaches in structural biology. 

BCMB 4120/6120. Human Biochemistry and Dis- 
ease. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 or BCMB 4010/6010. 

Integrated treatment of human biochemistry and se- 
lected topics on the biochemical basis of human dis- 
ease. Examples will be given of inheritable and 
acquired disorders. 

BCMB(ENTO) 4200/6200. Biotechnology. 3 hours 
Not open to students with credit in BCMB 4130/6130. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 or BCMB 4010/6010. 

Applied aspects of biochemistry and molecular biol- 
ogy in various fields, with emphasis on the use of re- 
combinant DNA methods and protein engineering. 

BCMB 6000. General Biochemistry and Molecular 
Biology. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in BCMB 4010/6010 
or BCMB 4020/6020 or BCMB 8010 or BCMB 8020. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2212 and CHEM 2212L. 
Beginning intensive one-semester graduate-level 
course in biochemistry and molecular biology cover- 
ing the structure and function of biological molecules, 
enzymology, metabolism, bioenergetics, and recombi- 
nant DNA technology. 

BCMB 7000. Master's Research. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 20 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

BCMB 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 20 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

BCMB 8010. Advanced Biochemistry and Molecu- 
lar Biology I. 4 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or BCMB 
4010/6010. 

Advanced biochemistry and molecular biology stress- 
ing thermodynamic principles in biochemistry, struc- 
tural biology, enzymology, and aspects of metabolism 
and bioenergetics. 

BCMB 8020. Advanced Biochemist™ and Molecu- 
lar Biology II. 4 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

Advanced biochemistn* and molecular biolog\ stress 
ing metabolism and bioenergetics. replication, tran- 
scription. RNA processing, genetic codes, translation, 
membrane transport, and signal transduction. 

BCMB 8030. Introduction to Research in Biochem- 
istr\ and Molecular Biology. I hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 
Overview of current dep artm ental research and intro- 
duction to research facilities. Training and practical 



G radua t e Schoot Description of i . 127 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



experience in oral presentation, scientific writing, and 
grant preparation. 

BCMB(CHEM) 8040. Advanced Physical Biochem- 
istry. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Principles in physical chemistry and biophysics to bi- 
ological macromolecules, including structural biology, 
hydrodynamics, electronic and magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy, and crystallography. 

BCMB 8050. Cellular and Molecular Biochemistry. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 5 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8020 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Advanced molecular and cellular biochemistry, in- 
cluding structure, biosynthesis, and assembly of cell 
proteins and nucleic acids. 

BCMB 8060. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 
Seminar. 2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 20 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8020. 

Seminar dealing with various topics in current bio- 
chemistry and molecular biology. 

BCMB 8070. Research Discussion. 1 hour. Repeat- 
able for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Seminar focused on current research in biochemistry 
and molecular biology. 

BCMB 8080. Current Literature in Biochemistry 
and Molecular Biology. 1 hour. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8020. 

Journal club in selected topics in cell and molecular 
biochemistry. 

BCMB 8100. Advanced Topics in Biochemistry and 
Molecular Biology. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 
1 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8020. 

Selected areas in current molecular and cell biochem- 
istry. Topics will change on a regular basis. 

BCMB(CHEM) 8110. Advanced Topics in Protein 
Structure-Function Relationships. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

The relationship of protein structure to biological 
function, including protein folding, conformation, sta- 
bility, and enzyme mechanisms. 

BCMB 8120. Advanced Topics in Gene Expression. 

2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

Biochemistry and molecular biology of nucleic acids, 

with emphasis on biosynthesis, structure, and function. 

BCMB 8130. Advanced Topics in Glycobiology. 

2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

Complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, includ- 
ing biosynthesis, structure, and biological function. 



BCMB 8140. Advanced Topics in Genomics and 

Bioinformatics. 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

Contemporary approaches in the genomics of bacteria, 

archaea and eucarya, including computer applications 

on the use of various data bases. 

BCMB 8150. Advanced Topics in Cellular Commu- 
nication and Regulation. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

Molecular mechanisms of intra- and inter-cellular 
communication, including the role of hormones, cy- 
tokines, neurotransmitters and receptors. 

BCMB 8160. Advanced Topics in the Biochemical 

Basis of Human Disease. 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

The molecular and cellular basis of human disease 

with emphasis on genetic and acquired disorders. 

BCMB 8170. Advanced Topics in Plant Biochem- 
istry and Molecular Biology. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

Advanced treatment of plant biochemistry and molec- 
ular biology, including photosynthesis and nitrogen 
fixation. 

BCMB(CHEM) 8180. X-Ray Crystallography. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010 and BCMB 8040. 

The basic principles of x-ray crystallography with 
major application to protein structure determination, 
including laboratories on crystallization techniques 
and data collection. 

BCMB(CHEM) 8190. NMR Spectroscopy of Bio- 
molecules. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB(CHEM) 8040. 
NMR spectroscopy with applications to proteins and 
other biopolymers. Special attention will be given to 
methods of structure determination. 

BCMB(CHEM) 8200. Molecular Modeling and 
Structure Computations. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 

4 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Modern biomolecular modeling and structure compu- 
tations with emphasis on the application of molecular 
dynamics simulations to proteins, carbohydrates, and 
protein-ligand complexes. Lectures will be comple- 
mented with laboratory sections on the use of model- 
ing software and computer hardware. 

(BCMB)CHEM 8220. Physical Methods in Inor- 
ganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. 4 hours. 3 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 8210. 

Physical methods used in inorganic and bioinorganic 
chemical research including UV/visible/near IR ab- 
sorption spectroscopy, (magnetic) circular dichroism, 
electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic 
resonance, Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectro- 
scopies, single crystal x-ray diffraction, and magneto- 
chemistry. 



128 / The University of Georgia 



Biology 



(BCMB)CHEM 8250. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BCMB 6000 or BCMB 
8010 or CHEM 6400 or permission of department. 
Biological processes and molecules, mainly proteins 
and nucleic acids, which incorporate metalions. Topics 
include metal binding to biopolymers, the roles of 
metal ions in biological processes such as electron 
transfer, atom or group transfer, and the use of metal 
complexes as therapeutic agents. 

(BCMB)CHEM 8330. Molecular Modeling. 3 hours. 
Computational studies to calculate the structures of or- 
ganic molecules. Specific training is given in the ap- 
plication of the molecular mechanics method and the 
MM-3 software package, ab initio calculations using 
the Gaussian software package, and other computa- 
tional schemes. Evaluation of computational results. 

(BCMB)CBIO(MIBO) 8520. Topics in Biochem- 
istry and Molecular Genetics of Parasites. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 1 hour lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8020 and GENE 8930. 
Parasite cellular biochemistry and molecular genetics 
with potential for rational drug design. Topics include 
DNA replication, RNA editing, nucleic acid salvage 
pathways, polyamine metabolism, and glycosylphos- 
phatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. 

(BCMB)CHEM 8810. Mass Spectrometry. 3 hours. 
Modern methods of mass spectrometry covering fun- 
damental principles, instrumentation, and data inter- 
pretation. New techniques for the structural analysis of 
biomolecules. 

(BCMB)GENE 8910. DNA Modeling. 2 hours. 
1 hour lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
The building of space filling models to help students 
understand the structure/function relationships of 
RNA and DNA. Computer modeling approaches will 
also be taught. 

(BCMB)BTNY(GENE)(PATH) 8960. Genetics of 
Yeast and Filamentous Fungi. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Classical genetics and molecular biology of budding 
yeast, fission yeast, and model filamentous fungi. In- 
cludes life cycle, cell cycle, cytoskeleton, mating 
types, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, mutant screens, 
and cloning strategies. 

BCMB 8990. Problems in Biochemistry and Mole- 
cular Biology. 1-10 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
20 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Focused research, advanced readings, and tutorials 
with faculty members. 

BCMB 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-15 hours Re 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members 



BCMB 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Biology 



Daniel V. DerVartanian, Chairman 
(Biological Sciences Building) 

The Division of Biological Sciences consists of 
the Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular 
Biology, Botany, Cellular Biology, Entomology, 
Genetics, Marine Sciences, Microbiology, the 
Institute of Ecology, and the Faculty of Cell and 
Developmental Biology. Degrees are granted 
only through the departments. 

(BIOL)BTNY(CRSS) 4500/6500. Introduction to 
Gene Technology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
Methods and applications of gene technology (recom- 
binant DNA) and related concepts in molecular biol- 
ogy. These will include structure and synthesis of 
macromolecules; cDNA and genomic cloning, poly- 
merase chain reaction; molecular markers and map- 
ping; gene isolation strategies; and various host-vector 
systems. 

(BIOL)GENE 4600/6600. Evolutionary Biology. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
An introduction to the processes of evolution. Topics 
include population genetics, speciation, systematics, 
coevolution, chemical origin of life, history of life, ge- 
ological record, and evolution of humans. 

BIOL(CBIOKVPAT) 5040/7040. Electron Mi- 
croscopy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [(CHEM 1212 and 
CHEM 1212L) or (CHEM 1412 and CHEM 1412L)] 
andPHYS 1112-1112L. 

Instrument theory and theory of specimen preparation 
for both transmission and scanning electron mi- 
croscopy. Fundamentals of X-ray microanalysis, 
image processing, and image analysis 

BIOE(CBIO) 5050I77050L. Electron Microscopy 
Laboratory. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 
(CBIOKVPAT) 5040/7040 or permission of depart- 
ment. 
Operation of both transmission (II Mi ami scanning 

electron microscopes (SEM). Preparation oi speci- 
mens (ultramicrotoiny, critical point drying; negative 
staining) for examination in both n\i ind SEM Ba 
sies ol x raj microanalysii 



(irmiiuitr .V< ln>ol DtSChpti 1 2V 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



BIOL 8000. Tropical Biology. 5-12 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Biological concepts pertaining to the tropics through 
intensive field study. 



Botany 



James L. Hamrick, Interim Head 
Stephen P. Hubbell, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-1871 
(Plant Sciences Building) 

Graduate work leading to the MS or PhD degree 
in botany may be undertaken by qualified stu- 
dents. Within specifications set by the Graduate 
School (see General Degrees), all degree re- 
quirements are determined by the major profes- 
sor and student in consultation with an advisory 
committee. Inquiries by prospective students 
should be addressed to: Graduate Coordinator, 
Department of Botany. 

Facilities for graduate training in botany in- 
clude greenhouses, growth chambers, field 
plots, a herbarium, culture collection of algae 
and fungi, electron microscope laboratory, mol- 
ecular cytology facility, monoclonal antibody 
facility, fully equipped computer facilities, and 
modern research laboratories. Research opportu- 
nities are also offered in the University Com- 
puter Center, the Electron Microscopy 
Laboratory, the Institute of Ecology, and the 
Molecular Genetics Instrumental facility. 

Field work may be done at the university ma- 
rine laboratories at Sapelo and Skidaway Is- 
lands, The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, 
and several inland sites ranging from the coastal 
plains to the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

(BTNY)PATH 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. Introduc- 
tory Mycology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (BTNY 1210-121 0L and 
BTNY 1220-1220L)or(BIOL 1 103-1 103L and BIOL 
1 104-1 104L) or (BIOL 1 107-1 107L and BIOL 1108- 
1108L). 

Morphology, biology, and taxonomy of fungi. Repre- 
sentatives of all major groups of fungi are considered. 

(BTNY)CRSS 4210/6210. Seed Physiology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: [CHHM 2100 or CHEM 
2211 or BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or BCMB 
4010/60101 and [PGEN 3580-3580L or GENE(BIOL) 
3200 or BTNY(CRSS)(BIOL) 4500/6500). 
Graduate prerequisite: [BCMB 4010/6010 or BCMB 



6000] and [BTNY(CRSS)(BIOL) 4500/6500 or 
BTNY 8100]. 

Undergraduate corequisite: CRSS 3300 or HORT 
4210/6210 or HORT 4440/6440-4440L/6440L or 
BTNY 3830-3830L. 

Graduate corequisite: HORT 4210/6210 or HORT 
4440/6440-4440L/6440L or BTNY 6830. 
Regulation of anabolic and catabolic events during 
seed development, maturation, and germination 
processes. Ecophysiological consequences of dor- 
mancy variables, and agricultural and industrial signif- 
icance of seed physiology. 

(BTNY)GEOG 4220/6220. Ecological Biogeogra- 
phy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3210 or ECOL 
(BIOL) 3500-3500L or permission of department. 
Patterns of plant distribution in contemporary land- 
scapes and underlying processes, including vegetation 
dynamics, disturbance ecology, biogeomorphology, 
dendrochronology, and environmental history. 

BTNY 4230/6230-4230L/6230L. Plant Anatomy. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1104-1104L or 
BIOL 1108-1108L or (BTNY 1220-1220L and CBIO 
(BIOL) 3400) or permission of department. 
Structure and growth of meristems; development and 
structure of cells, tissues, and tissue systems; compar- 
ative anatomy of stems, roots, leaves, flowers, and 
fruits; survey of recent advances in study of growth 
and development of form and emphasis on experimen- 
tal approaches. Assumes elementary knowledge of cell 
and tissue structure. 

(BTNY)GEOG 4240/6240. Plant Geography. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L and 
GEOG 1 1 12 and [GEOG 3210 or ECOL(BIOL) 3500- 
3500L] or permission of department. 
Phytogeographical zonation, plant-geographic pro- 
cesses, and current potential natural vegetation. 
Includes physical and environmental factors, plant-en- 
vironment relationships, plant roles and types, vegeta- 
tion dynamics, geographic responses to disturbance, 
and vegetation of main world biomes. Emphasis on 
global-scale patterns and relationships. 

BTNY 4250/6250. Biology of Natural Plant Prod- 
ucts. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L or 
BIOL 1 108-1 108L or BTNY 1220-1220L or permis- 
sion of department. 

The biological/ecological role of natural plant prod- 
ucts or metabolites such as alkaloids, terpenes, and 
pigments in relationships and interactions among 
plants and between plants and animals. 

(BTNY)ANTH 4300/6300-4300L/6300L. Ethnob- 
otany. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Ethnobotanical research, with focus on knowledge and 
utilization of the plant world in traditional societies. 



130 / The University of Georgia 



_ 



Botany 



Comparisons of societies in tropical forest ecosystems 
and evaluation of issues relating to intellectual prop- 
erty rights and traditional peoples' knowledge of plant 
species with potential economic value. 

BTNY(BIOL)(CRSS) 4500/6500. Introduction to 
Gene Technology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
Methods and applications of gene technology (recom- 
binant DNA) and related concepts in molecular biol- 
ogy. These will include structure and synthesis of 
macromolecules; cDNA and genomic cloning, poly- 
merase chain reaction; molecular markers and map- 
ping; gene isolation strategies; and various host-vector 
systems. 

(BTNY)CBIO 4600/6600-4600L/6600L. Biology of 
Protists. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L or 
BIOL 1108-1 108L or BTNY 1220-1220L. 
Protists (algae, protozoa, and zoosporic fungi) with an 
emphasis on cell structure, evolution, and life histo- 
ries. Laboratories will concentrate on examination of 
living and fixed materials and will include methods of 
isolation and culturing of protists. 

BTNY 4650/6650-4650L/6650L. Plant Taxonomy. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L or 
BIOL 1108-1108L or BTNY 1220-1220L or permis- 
sion of department. 

History of taxonomy, nomenclature, characters, identi- 
fication principles, classification, taxonomic relation- 
ships, taxonomic literature, species biology, collecting 
and herbarium, floristic studies. 

BTNY 4850/6850-4850L/6850L. Vegetation Analy- 
sis. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (ECOL(BIOL) 3500- 
3500L and STAT 6220) or permission of department. 
Rationale and protocols for various methods of study- 
ing vegetation at the population, community and land- 
scape levels. Both field sampling and data analysis 
techniques will be covered with introduction to several 
software packages. 

BTNY 6350-6350L. Molecular Systematics. 3 hours 

2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L or BIOL 1108-I108L 
or BTNY 1220-1220L. 
Phylogenetic analysis, molecular systematic methods, 

relationships within the higher plants, algae, and fungi 
based upon analyses of DNA sequences and DNA-de- 
rived markers from nuclear and organella! genomes 
Labs: computer-assisted techniques for phylogenetic 
analysis of macromolecular data; individual projects 
involving the analysis of DNA sequence data 

BTNY 6710-6710L. Principles of Plant Systematics. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L or BIOL 1108 II0S1 
or BTNY 1 220- 1 2201. 
Systematics, nomenclature, rank and taxa, phyloge- 



netic and phenetic methods, problem design, analyti- 
cal procedures, data presentation, identification of spe- 
cial groups, classification, phylogenetic relationships, 
literature and bibliographic aids. Labs: morphology 
and arrangement of selected phylogenetically signifi- 
cant families; literature-based study of small genus or 
species complex. 

BTNY 6720-6720L. Plant Variation and Evolution. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 4600/6600. 
Variation and evolution in plants, genotypic and phe- 
notypic patterns, genetic diversity, adaptation, breed- 
ing systems, polyploidy, hybridization, apomixis, 
evolutionary data in population genetics and systemat- 
ics, literature, experimental design, population sam- 
pling. Variation analysis, breeding techniques, data 
presentation, population analysis, molecular evolu- 
tion. 

BTNY 6830. Plant Physiology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 
Plant physiology for students with cell physiology or 
biochemistry background. Water relations, mineral nu- 
trition, transport of materials, respiration, photosyn- 
thesis, growth and development. 

BTNY 7000. Master's Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

BTNY 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 14 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

BTNY 7360. Teaching Internship in Biological Sci- 
ences. 1-2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 10 hours 
credit. 1-2 hours lab per week. 
Classroom teaching experience in undergraduate 
courses under the direct supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber. 

BTNY 8020. Introduction to Botanical Research. 

1-2 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The breadth of current botanical research with the fa- 
cilities available for botanical research. 

BTNY 8040. Botanical Research. 1-3 hours Repeat 
able for maximum t> hours credit 3-9 hours lab per 

week. 

Faculty-directed, laboratory, or literature research of a 
botanical problem. Not tor thesis or dissertation re- 
search. 

BTNY M00. Plant Molecular, Cellular, and Devel- 
opmental Biologv I. 4 hours 3 hours lecture and 2 
hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite BCMB(BIO! xCHIAI) 3100 CM Gl Nl 
(BIOl ) J200. 
Plant genetics, gene expression, and gene evolution. 



Graduate School Dot ription afO • ■ < 1 3 1 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Structural, physiological, and genetic properties of or- 
ganelles, membranes, and the cell wall. Topics are in- 
terrelated with those of Plant Molecular, Cellular, and 
Developmental Biology II. 

BTNY 8110. Plant Molecular, Cellular, and Devel- 
opmental Biology II. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 

2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BTNY 8100. 

Plant cell structure, growth and development, repro- 
duction and environmental responses. Topics are inter- 
related with those in Plant Molecular, Cellular, and 
Developmental Biology I. 

(BTNY)ECOL 8120-8120L. Plant Reproductive 
Ecology. 4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Pollination ecology, breeding systems, patterns of 
gene flow via pollen and seed dispersal, flower 
arrangement and phenology, and implications of re- 
productive biology for demography. Group and indi- 
vidual laboratory projects. 

BTNY 8140. Algal Ecology. 2 hours 
Prerequisite: CBIO(BTNY) 4600/6600-4600L/6600L 
or permission of department. 

Physiological ecology of algae found in various habi- 
tats, including phytoplankton, benthic microalgae, 
seaweeds, and symbiotic associations. 

(BTNY)ECOL(ENTO) 8150. Wetland Ecology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Principles of ecology, elemental cycling, hydrology, 
policy and management of marine and freshwater wet- 
lands. 

(BTNY)ECOL(ENTO) 8150L. Wetland Ecology 
Laboratory. 1 hour. 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ECOL(ENTO)(BTNY) 8150 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Techniques for the study of marine and freshwater 
wetlands. Optional weekend field trips will explore 
distant wetland sites. 

(BTNY)PATH 8210-8210L. Biology of As- 

comycetes. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab 

per week. 

Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 

Comparative morphology of ascomycetes and their 

asexual stages; principles of taxonomy and training in 

identification. 

BTNY 8230. Monoclonal Antibodies as Research 
Tools. 5 hours. 2 hours lecture and 9 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 6000. 

The theoretical and practical aspects of antibodies as 
research tools in the life sciences. Production of both 
polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies will be consid- 
ered, as well as their applications for immunovisual- 
ization, immunopurification, immunoquantitation, and 
other analytical applications. 



(BTNY)ECOL(FORS) 8310. Population Ecology. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L and permis- 
sion of department. 

Advanced ecological theory to biological populations. 
Mathematical and evolutionary treatment of popula- 
tion growth and regulation, niche theory, foraging the- 
ory, predator-prey theory, habitat selection, and 
competition. 

BTNY(PATH) 8320-8320L. Zoosporic Fungi and 
Slime Molds. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab 
per week. 

Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 
Comparative biology of zoosporic fungi and slime 
molds as organisms. Topics include current research in 
morphology and development, phylogeny, physiology, 
ecology and the use of selected organisms as model 
systems. Laboratory will emphasize isolation and cul- 
tivation of these organisms and demonstration of their 
reproductive stages. 

BTNY(PATH) 8340-8340L. Experimental Mycol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 
Fungal biology and ecology and the use of fungi as ex- 
perimental organisms in the study of development and 
molecular biology and genetics. 

BTNY 8360. Fungal Ecology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PATH(BTNY) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. 
The role of fungi in the environment. Topics include 
fungal populations; biotic interactions with plants, in- 
sects, and other fungi; decomposition and nutrient cy- 
cling; fungal biomass and productivity; fungi in 
extreme environments. 

BTNY(ECOLXFORS) 8410. Community Ecology. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: ECOL 40 1 0/60 1 0-40 1 OL/60 1 0L and 
STAT 4220. 

The applicability of advanced theory to multi-species 
communities. Patterns and processes that influence 
species composition, diversity, and function. Topics 
include deterministic vs. stochastic regulation, succes- 
sion, resource partitioning, patch dynamics, island bio- 
geography, and food webs. 

BTNY 8600. Aquatic Plants. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 103-1 103L or BIOL 1 104-1 104L 
or BTNY 1210-1210L or BTNY 1220-1220L or per- 
mission of department. 

Identification and biology of aquatic macrophytes 
with emphasis on field work. 

BTNY 8700. Plant Population and Biology Semi- 
nar. 1-2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours 
credit. 2-4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Seminar on current research topics in plant population 
biology. 

BTNY 8770. Communities and Ecosystems. 3 hours. 
Advanced synthesis of physiological, population, 



1 32 / The University of Georgia 



Cellular Biology 



community, and ecosystem studies in the major terres- 
trial plant associations of the world. 

BTNY 8800. Plant Systematics and Evolution Sem- 
inar. 1-2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 16 hours 
credit. 2-4 hours lab per week. 
Seminar on current botanical research topics. 

BTNY 8810. Mycology Seminar. 1-2 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 2-4 hours lab per 
week. 
Seminar on current botanical research topics. 

BTNY 8820. Plant Physiology Seminar. 1-2 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 2-4 hours 

lab per week. 

Seminar on current botanical research topics. 

BTNY 8840. Plant Ecology Seminar. 1-2 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 2-4 hours lab 
per week. 

Seminar on current plant ecology and related research 
topics. 

BTNY 8850-8850L. Terrestrial Biogeochemical Cy- 
cling. 4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or STAT 
4210 or STAT 4220. 

Plant processes which mediate biogeochemical cy- 
cling on land. Includes survey of global element cy- 
cling, functions of essential elements, element 
acquisition, translocation and loss by plants, litter de- 
composition, and methods of estimating standing 
stocks of elements in and transfer rates of elements be- 
tween ecosystem components. 

BTNY 8860. Plant Anatomy, Morphology, and Cell 
Biology Seminar. 1-2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
18 hours credit. 2-4 hours lab per week. 
Seminar on current topics in plant anatomy, morphol- 
ogy, and cell biology. 

BTNY 8890-8890L. Plant Physiological Ecology. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BTNY 6830. 

Energy balances, water relations, stomatal physiology, 
gas exchange, environmental aspects of mineral nutri- 
tion, stress physiology, and productivity. 

(BTNY)CRSS 8900. Advanced Plant Genetics. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: BTNY 8100 or CRSS 8890-8890L or 
permission of department. 

Recent developments in plant genetics: sexual incom- 
patibilities and somatic hybridization, genetic engi- 
neering; RFLPs and other molecular markers, linkage 
and mapping: cytoplasmic genetics; and classic pa- 
pers. 

BTNY(BCMB)(GENE)(PATH) 8960. Genetics of 
Yeast and Filamentous Fungi. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 
Classical genetics and molecular biologs oi budding 
yeast, fission \east. and model filamentous fungi. In- 
cludes life cycle, cell cycle, cwoskclcion. mating 



types, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, mutant screens, 
and cloning strategies. 

BTNY 8970. Current Topics in Research. 1-2 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 2-4 hours 
lab per week. 

Subjects of current interest in plant research. Current 
literature and modern analysis of research results. 
Course is designed to meet the specific research needs 
of the student. 

BTNY 8980. Special Topics in Botany. 1-2 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 18 hours credit. 2-4 hours 
lab per week. 
Discussion of selected topics in plant biology. 

BTNY 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

BTNY 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 2 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Cellular Biology 



Joe W. Crim, Head 

Marcus Fechheimer, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-3338 
(Biological Sciences Building) 

The Department of Cellular Biology offers MS 
and PhD degrees. Requirements for the MS in- 
clude 30 hours of course work, satisfactory per- 
formance on written and oral examinations, and 
an acceptable thesis embodying original re- 
search in a specialized area. Requirements tor 
the PhD include 30 hours of coursework, satis- 
factory performance on written and oral exami- 
nations and an acceptable dissertation and 
defense thereof. Required core course work for 
both MS and PhD includes: Introduction to Re- 
search in Cellular Biology (CBIO 6130); Mole- 
cular Bell Biology (CBIO 8010); Cellular 
Biology Research Techniques (Laboratory Rota- 
tions - CBIO 8920); and either Advanced Im- 
munology (CBIO 8100). Advanced 
Developmental Biolog) (CBIO 8300), Ad- 
vanced Cell Biolog) (CBIO 84(H)). or Biolog} 
of Parasitism (CBIO iditional course- 

work is as established b\ the student's commit- 
tee. 

The department's research strengths are in 



Gr adu ate School Description <>f Count * 133 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



cell biology, developmental biology, and molec- 
ular parasitology. Facilities for graduate training 
include campus laboratories fully equipped with 
computers and modern instrumentation for cell 
sorting and image analysis, electron and confo- 
cal microscopy, molecular biology, and animal 
rooms equipped to handle multiple species. The 
department also has adjunct faculty at the Cen- 
ters for Disease Control in Atlanta. 

Contact the Graduate Coordinator, Dr. Mar- 
cus Fechheimer, if you have questions regarding 
the graduate program or see the web site at 
http://www.uga.edu/cellbio. 

CBIO(MIBO) 4100/6100. Immunology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 and GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
Immunology from an experimental perspective. 
Anatomy, development, and function of the immune 
system. Immune system in infectious diseases. Mech- 
anisms and pathogenesis of immunological disorders. 
Evolution of immunological concepts. 

CBIO 4340/6340. Biology of Aging. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Biological processes accompanying aging in human 
and other organisms. Emphasis on physiological de- 
cline; theoretical explanations; attempts to prolong 
life; and the utility and limitations of model systems 
used to analyze human aging. 

CBIO 4500/6500-4500L/6500L. Medical Parasitol- 
ogy. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Major protozoan and metazoan endo- and ectopara- 
sites of humans. Principles of parasitism and general 
biology of each parasite. Vector biology, epidemiol- 
ogy, control, and treatment of parasitic diseases are 
discussed. Laboratory stresses diagnosis and identifi- 
cation, and introduces pathology through the use of 
fixed and living material. 

CBIO(BTNY) 4600/6600-4600L/6600L. Biology of 
Protists. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1104-1104L or 
BIOL 1 1 08- 1 1 08L or BTN Y 1 220- 1 220L. 
Protists (algae, protozoa, and zoosporic fungi) with an 
emphasis on cell structure, evolution, and life histo- 
ries. Laboratories will concentrate on examination of 
living and fixed materials and will include methods of 
isolation and culturing of protists. 

CBIO 4730/6730. Endocrinology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (BIOL 1 103-1 103L and 
BIOL 1104-1I04L) or (BIOL 1 107-1 107L and BIOL 
1108-1108L). 

Vertebrate endocrinology and the principles of chemi- 
cal integration, emphasizing the physiology of regula- 
tory mechanisms and the cellular and molecular bases 
of hormone action. 



(CBIO)BIOL(VPAT) 5040/7040. Electron Mi- 
croscopy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [(CHEM 1212 and 
CHEM 1212L) or (CHEM 1412 and CHEM 1412L)] 
andPHYS 1112-1112L. 

Instrument theory and theory of specimen preparation 
for both transmission and scanning electron mi- | 
croscopy. Fundamentals of X-ray microanalysis, 
image processing, and image analysis. 

(CBIO)BIOL 5050L/7050L. Electron Microscopy 
Laboratory. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 
(CBIOXVPAT) 5040/7040 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Operation of both transmission (TEM) and scanning 
electron microscopes (SEM). Preparation of speci- 
mens (ultramicrotomy, critical point drying, negative 
staining) for examination in both TEM and SEM. Ba- 
sics of X-ray microanalysis. 

CBIO 6130. Introduction to Research in Cellular 
Biology. 1 hour. 2 hours lab per week. 
Introduces new Cellular Biology graduate students to 
research in the department, to research facilities, to the 
Science Library, and to laboratory safety. Professional 
ethics and responsibilities. 

CBIO 7000. Master's Research. 1-15 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CBIO 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-15 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

CBIO 8010. Molecular Cell Biology. 3 hours. 
Not open to students with credit in CBIO 6400. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Molecular cell biology emphasizing experimental ap- 
proaches that have led to our current understanding of 
cellular architecture, macromolecular components and 
how they influence cell function. 

CBIO 8050-8050L. Techniques in Modern Mi- 
croscopy. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: (PHYS 1112-1112L or PHYS 3330- 
3330L) and permission of department. 
Modern microscopical techniques: brightfield, phase, 
DIC, fluorescence, confocal, scanning tunneling, and 
scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Re- 
lated techniques: X-ray microanalysis photomicrogra- 
phy, and image analysis and processing. 

CBIO 8100. Advanced Immunology. 3 hours. 
3 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: CBIO(MIBO) 4100/6100 or MMIB 
4 1 00/6 1 00-4 1 00L/6 1 00L or permission of department. 
Immunology with emphasis on underlying mecha- 
nisms of development and function of the immune sys- 



134 / The University of Georgia 



Chemistry 



tern. Students will critically evaluate current literature 
and design experiments to test hypotheses. 

CBIO 8300. Advanced Developmental Biology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [GENE(BIOL) 3200 and CBIO(BIOL) 

3400] or permission of department. 

Experimental analysis of invertebrate and vertebrate 

development. 

CBIO 8400. Advanced Cell Biology. 3 hours. 
Structure and function of living cells. Biological ques- 
tions, molecular mechanisms, and experimental ap- 
proaches. 

CBIO 8480. Advanced Topics in Cell Biology. 

1-5 hours. Repeatable for maximum 5 hours credit. 
Current cell biological research using sources in the 
primary literature. 

CBIO 8490. Cell Biology Seminar. 1 hour. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 1 hour lab per week. 
Weekly discussion of current research in cell biology. 
Student presentations and development of public 
speaking skills. 

CBIO 8500. Biology of Parasitism. 4 hours. 3 hours 
lecture and 1 hour lab per week. 
Prerequisite: [CBIO(MIBO) 4100/6100 and CBIO 
4500/6500-4500L/6500L and BCMB 8020 and GENE 
8920] or permission of department. 
Parasitism and host-parasite interactions from cell bi- 
ological, immunological, biochemical and molecular 
biological perspectives. Major protozoan and helminth 
parasites of humans, and unique aspects of immunity 
to parasites and parasite cellular biochemistry and 
molecular genetics. The control of parasites via vac- 
cine development and chemotherapy. 

CBIO(BCMB)(MIBO) 8520. Topics in Biochem- 
istry and Molecular Genetics of Parasites. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 1 hour lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8020 and GENE 8930. 
Parasite cellular biochemistry and molecular genetics 
with potential for rational drug design. Topics include 
DNA replication, RNA editing, nucleic acid salvage 
pathways, polyamine metabolism, and glycosylphos- 
phatidylinositol (GPI) anchors 

CBIO(PARA)(POUL) 8560. Seminar in Parasitol- 
ogy. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 
1 hour lab per week. 
Weekly discussion of parasitological topics. 

CBIO 8580. Advanced Topics in Parasitology. 1-3 

hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit 
Prerequisite: CBIO 8500. 

Topics in parasitology and host-parasite interactions. 
Either cell biological/immunological or biochemi- 
cal/molecular genetic aspects of parasites 

CBIO 8700. Membrane Transporters — Pumps, 
Carriers, and Channels. 2 hours. 2 hours lecture and 

4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission ol department. 



Identification, mechanism, roles, and regulation of 
membrane transport pathways. 

CBIO 8730. Advanced Cell and Molecular En- 
docrinology. 2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours 
credit. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: CBIO 4730/6730 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Modern vertebrate endocrinology, emphasizing spe- 
cial topics in research of physiological regulatory 
mechanisms and the molecular bases for hormone ac- 
tions. 

CBIO 8920L. Cellular Biology Research Tech- 
niques. 1-2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Corequisite: CBIO 6130. 

Student rotations in the research laboratories of faculty 
members. Not for thesis or dissertation. 

CBIO 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-15 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CBIO 9010. Problems in Cellular Biology. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 2-6 hours 
lab per week. 
Approved problems in cellular biology. 

CBIO 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Chemistry 



Robert A. Scott, Head 

I. Jonathan Amster, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2001 
(Chemistry Building) 

The Department of Chemistry offers courses of 
study and research leading to the Master of Sci- 
ence and Doctor o( Philosophy degrees. The 
candidate for the Master of Science degree must 
complete a program o\ Stud) approved b\ 
his/her major professor, the graduate coordina- 
tor, and the dean of the Graduate School. The 
student must complete and defend a thesis based 
upon his/her research. This research should in- 
volve contributions of a publishablc quality. 

The PhD applicant chooses a major concen- 
tration in analytical, inorganic, organic, or phys- 
ical Chemistry. A program of Stud) including 
course work in the major Held and the student's 



Graduate St hoot Description ol ( i m N I 135 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



research objectives must be completed and ap- 
proved by the major professor, the graduate co- 
ordinator, and the dean of the Graduate School. 
After satisfactorily completing his/her pre- 
scribed course of study and a comprehensive 
written and oral examination in his/her major 
field, the student is officially admitted to candi- 
dacy for the PhD degree. This degree is awarded 
for proficiency and scholarship in research and a 
thorough acquaintance with a specific field of 
knowledge which the candidate demonstrates by 
the presentation and defense of a dissertation 
based upon independent work which contributes 
significantly to knowledge in the student's field. 
Unless otherwise specified, all laboratory pe- 
riods are three hours. 

(CHEM)BCMB 4110/6110. Physical Biochemistry. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2210. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: BCMB 
(BIOLXCHEM) 3100 or BCMB 4010/6010 or PHYS 
1112-1112LorPHYS 1212-1212L. 
The principles of physical chemistry applied to bio- 
logical molecules and systems, including current ap- 
proaches in structural biology. 

CHEM 4190/6190. Introduction to NMR Spec- 
troscopy. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 
week. 

Instrumental aspects of NMR spectroscopy including 
pulsed Fourier transform techniques, proton and car- 
bon- 13 techniques used in the analysis of organic com- 
pounds, polypeptides and other small molecules. The 
focus is on the operation of NMR spectrometers 
presently available in the University of Georgia Chem- 
istry Department. 

CHEM 6400. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

Modern theories of bonding, structure, reaction mech- 
anisms, and synthetic methods in inorganic, orga- 
nometallic, and bioinorganic chemistry. 

CHEM 6911. Physical Chemistry I. 3 hours 
Fundamental principles of physical chemistry. Kinetic 
molecular theory, thermodynamics, equilibria, electro- 
chemistry. 

CHEM 6912. Physical Chemistry II. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: CHEM 6911. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry. Reac- 
tion kinetics, quantum mechanics, and molecular spec 

troscopy. 

CHEM 7000. Master's Research. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 



CHEM 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

CHEM 7500L. Basics of Scientific Glass Blowing. 

1 hour. 2 hours lab per week. 

The fundamentals of scientific glass-blowing. Stu- \ 
dents will work 'hands-on' developing skills and tech- 
niques useful in constructing many glass laboratory 
items. Bending, sealing, blowing, and cutting Pyrex I 
glass will be covered. Students will also be introduced 
to different types of glass, availability of materials, 
and safe handling and repair of glassware. 

(CHEM)BCMB 8040. Advanced Physical Biochem- 
istry. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Principles in physical chemistry and biophysics to bi- 
ological macromolecules, including structural biology, 
hydrodynamics, electronic and magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy, and crystallography. 

(CHEM)BCMB 8110. Advanced Topics in Protein 
Structure-Function Relationships. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010. 

The relationship of protein structure to biological 
function, including protein folding, conformation, sta- 
bility, and enzyme mechanisms. 

CHEM 8120. Inorganic Chemistry Graduate Sem- 
inar. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Current topics in inorganic or bioinorganic chemistry. 
Training in oral and visual presentation of inorganic 
and bioinorganic chemical research. 

CHEM 8130. Organic Chemistry Graduate Semi- 
nar. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Current topics in organic chemistry. Presentations are 
given by visiting scientists, UGA faculty and students. 
Training is given in oral and visual presentations of or- 
ganic chemistry research. 

CHEM 8140. Physical Chemistry Graduate Semi- 
nar. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Current topics in physical chemistry and chemical 
physics. Presentations will be given by visiting speak- 
ers, by UGA chemistry faculty, and by students. Train- 
ing will be provided in oral and visual presentations of 
physical chemistry research. 

CHEM 8150. Analytical Chemistry Graduate Sem- 
inar. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Current topics in analytical chemistry. Presentations 
by visiting speakers, UGA faculty and students. Train- 
ing in oral and visual presentations of analytical chem- 
ical research. 

(CHEM)BCMB 8180. X-Ray Crystallography. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8010 and BCMB 8040. 
The basic principles of x-ray crystallography with 
major application to protein structure determination, 



136/ The University of Georgia 



Chemistry 



including laboratories on crystallization techniques 
and data collection. 

(CHEM)BCMB 8190. NMR Spectroscopy of Bio- 
molecules. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BCMB(CHEM) 8040. 
NMR spectroscopy with applications to proteins and 
other biopolymers. Special attention will be given to 
methods of structure determination. 

(CHEM)BCMB 8200. Molecular Modeling and 
Structure Computations. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 
4 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Modern biomolecular modeling and structure compu- 
tations with emphasis on the application of molecular 
dynamics simulations to proteins, carbohydrates, and 
protein-ligand complexes. Lectures will be comple- 
mented with laboratory sections on the use of model- 
ing software and computer hardware. 

CHEM 8210. Chemical Applications of Group The- 
ory. 3 hours. 

The description of chemical bonding and other proper- 
ties of organic and inorganic molecules in terms of 
group theory and symmetry. Topics include molecular 
symmetry and point groups, group theory and quan- 
tum mechanics, and symmetry aspects of molecular 
orbital theory, chemical reactions, ligand field theory 
and molecular vibrations. 

CHEM(BCMB) 8220. Physical Methods in Inor- 
ganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. 4 hours. 3 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 8210. 

Physical methods used in inorganic and bioinorganic 
chemical research including UV/visible/near IR ab- 
sorption spectroscopy, (magnetic) circular dichroism, 
electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic 
resonance, Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectro- 
scopies, single crystal x-ray diffraction, and magneto- 
chemistry. 

CHEM 8230. Main Group Inorganic Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 8210. 

Descriptive and theoretical aspects of the structure and 

reactivity of the main group elements. 

CHEM 8240. Transition Metal Chemistry. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: CHEM 8210. 

Descriptive and theoretical aspects of the structure and 
reactivity of transition metal compounds, including 
coordination chemistry and organometallic chemistry. 

CHEM(BCMB) 8250. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BCMB 6(XK) or BCMB 

8010 or CHEM 6400 or permission of department 

Biological processes and molecules, mainly proteins 
and nucleic acids, which incorporate metal ions. Top 
ics include metal binding to biopokmers, the roles of 
metal ions in biological processes such as electron 



transfer, atom or group transfer, and the use of metal 
complexes as therapeutic agents. 

CHEM 8290. Special Topics in Inorganic Chem- 
istry. 1-4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours 
credit. 

A selected specialized area of inorganic, organometal- 
lic or bioinorganic chemistry. Examples include pho- 
tochemistry, organometallic chemistry, kinetics and 
mechanisms, etc. 

CHEM 8300. Stereochemistry and Conformations. 

3 hours. 

Structures of organic molecules in terms of molecular 
orbitals, stereochemistry and conformational analysis. 
Three dimensional structures, isomeric structures and 
optical activity. 

CHEM 8310. Reaction Mechanisms in Organic 
Chemistry. 3 hours. 

Selected organic reactions are discussed in terms of 
modern electronic structure and bonding theories. Im- 
portant mechanisms are presented in the context of 
modern mechanistic theories. Isotope effects and reac- 
tion rates. 

CHEM 8320. Synthetic Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. 
Established organic chemistry synthetic procedures as 
applied in selected important reactions. Synthetic 
strategies and methodologies and retrosynthetic analy- 
sis. 

CHEM(BCMB) 8330. Molecular Modeling. 3 hours. 
Computational studies to calculate the structures of or- 
ganic molecules. Specific training is given in the ap- 
plication of the molecular mechanics method and the 
MM-3 software package, ab initio calculations using 
the Gaussian software package, and other computa- 
tional schemes. Evaluation of computational results. 

CHEM 8340. Organic Spectroscopic Analysis. 

3 hours. 

Ultraviolet, infrared, H- and C- nuclear magnetic res- 
onance and mass spectrometry as tools for the charac- 
terization of the structure of organic molecules, with 
particular emphasis on identifying structures for repre- 
sentative sets of spectra. 

CHEM 8350. Physical and Biological Organic 
Chemistry. 3 hours 

Topics at the interface of biological and organic chem- 
istry, with emphasis on physical methods of character- 
ization. Proteins and enzymes, with attention to 
reaction kinetics, structural characten/ation, and 
structure- 1 unction relationships. 

CHEM 8390. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. 

1-4 boim. Repeatable tor maximum 15 hours credit 

Specialized research topics m organic chemistry. Em- 
phasis is given to recent literature descriptions o\ 
cutting edge research Topics include \-ra\ crystallog- 
raphy, natural products, and heterocyclic chemislr\ 

CHEM(BCMB) KXio. Mass Spectrometry. ! hours 
Modern methods of mass spectrometry covering fun- 
damental principles, instrumentation, and data inter 



Graduate School Description of i 137 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



pretation. New techniques for the structural analysis of 
biomolecules. 

CHEM 8820. Electrochemistry. 3 hours. 
Electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry, in- 
cluding the treatment of mass transport, interfacial and 
coupled chemical processes; the thermodynamics, ki- 
netics and mechanisms of electron transfer processes; 
and electrochemical methodologies including con- 
trolled-potential or controlled-current methods under 
transient and steady-state conditions. 

CHEM 8830. Electronics. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture 
and 3 hours lab per week. 

Analog and digital electronic circuit design and con- 
struction, as well as the interfacing of computers to 
laboratory instrumentation. 

CHEM 8840. Surface and Thin Film Analysis. 

3 hours. 

Surfaces and thin films, including the construction and 
use of ultra-high vacuum apparatus. Various mi- 
croscopy and elemental analysis techniques are inves- 
tigated, including XRD, SEM, STM, AFM, LEED, 
Auger spectroscopy, XPS, EPMA and others. 

CHEM 8850. Analytical Spectrometry. 3 hours. 
The instrumentation and methods used for spectromet- 
ric measurements throughout the spectrum from 
gamma-radiation to radio frequencies. Attention is 
given to the uses, applications, and limitations of all 
methods studied. 

CHEM 8860. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

Selected principles of analytical chemistry such as: 
techniques of analytical separations, including liquid 
and gas chromatography and electrophoresis; sam- 
pling theory; and chemometrics, including experimen- 
tal design, statistics and data evaluation. 

CHEM 8890. Special Topics in Analytical Chem- 
istry. 1-4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours 
credit. 

A selected specialized area of analytical chemistry. 
Emphasis is on current topics in cutting edge research, 
as presented in recent journal literature. Representa- 
tive topics include Fourier transform methods, etc. 

CHEM 8920. Thermodynamics and Statistical Me- 
chanics. 3 hours. 

Classical and statistical thermodynamics applied to 
chemical reactions, phase equilibria and solutions. The 
thermodynamic properties of macroscopic matter in 
terms of the molecular properties. Boltzman, Bose- 
Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions and their appli- 
cations to physical and chemical systems. 

CHEM 8930. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry. 

3 hours. 

The principles of quantum mechanics and their appli- 
cation to chemical systems. The Schrodinger equation 
and strategies for solving it. Studies of exactly soluble 
model systems such as the particle in a box, harmonic 
oscillator, rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. 



CHEM 8940. Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics. 

3 hours. 

Mechanisms and rates of chemical reactions in the gas 
phase and in solution. Fast time-resolved experimental 
techniques to measure reaction rates and reaction in- 
termediates. Photochemical and crossed molecular 
beam studies of elementary reactions. Energy transfer 
and state-specific disposal of energy in simple reac- 
tions. Unimolecular and bimolecular rate theories. 

CHEM 8950. Advanced Quantum Chemistry. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 8930. 

Topics in quantum and computational chemistry in- 
cluding detailed studies of atomic and molecular elec- 
tronic structure and bonding. Various strategies and 
methodologies for computations of molecular struc- 
ture and bonding, including the evaluation of these 
strategies in the context of experimental data. 

CHEM 8960. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 8210 and CHEM 8930. 
Optical absorption and emission spectroscopy of di- 
atomic and polyatomic molecules and how the details 
of spectra can be used to determine molecular struc- 
ture and intramolecular dynamics. Microwave, in- 
frared, UV-visible, and photoelectron spectroscopy are 
studied with emphasis on the high resolution measure- 
ments possible with laser instruments. 

CHEM 8990. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 

1-4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
A selected specialized area of physical chemistry or 
chemical physics. Typical areas include interstellar 
chemistry, laser technology, ion chemistry, etc. The 
focus is on current literature and ongoing research in 
cutting edge areas. 

CHEM 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CHEM 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Classics 



Richard A. LaFleur, Head 

Naomi J. Norman, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2187 
( Park Hall) 

Graduate work is offered in Greek, Latin, or 
classics leading to a Master of Arts degree. Re- 
quirements for the degree include 28 hours of 



138 / The University of Georgia 



course work, exclusive of thesis, of which 12 
hours must be in the major language (for the de- 
gree in Latin or Greek), or 1 8 hours in Greek and 
Latin combined (for the classics degree), and the 
remainder in any of a variety of courses in 
Greek, Latin, classical civilization, ancient his- 
tory, archaeology, art, philosophy, linguistics, or 
other related areas, to be chosen in consultation 
with the department. All candidates complete a 
thesis related to their major language and must 
pass both a reading list exam based on a list of 
readings in ancient authors and modern criticism 
and an oral examination on their thesis. All can- 
didates must also demonstrate a reading knowl- 
edge of German, French, or Italian. 

Master's candidates in classics may apply for 
admission to any of the University's doctoral 
programs in comparative literature, linguistics, 
art history, or philosophy. The University's Col- 
lege of Education provides courses that may be 
taken simultaneously with those in classics to 
obtain teacher certification (in Georgia, Certifi- 
cates T-5, T-6 and D-7). The MEd, EdS, and PhD 
degrees in language education/Latin are also 
available. 

Graduate credit is offered for summer semes- 
ter participation in the University of Georgia 
Classics Studies Abroad Program in Rome. 

Several teaching and non-teaching assistant- 
ships are available; application deadline is Janu- 
ary 1. 

All degrees, except the PhD and MA degrees 
in Greek and classics, may be earned on a sum- 
mers-only basis; Latin teachers from out of state 
are awarded tuition waivers, reducing fees to the 
in-state level. 



Classical Culture 

CLAS 4010/6010. Archaic Greece. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
1020 or HIST 3250 or HIST 431 1/631 1 or permission 
of department. 

The expanding world of Greek culture in the period 
from 750 to 480 BC, including consideration of the 
many new and influential developments in an. litera- 
ture, history, political science, and philosophy, and 
their interrelationships. 

CLAS 4020/6020. Greek Sanctuaries and Festivals. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS KKH) or HIS] 
3250 or HIST 33 1 or HIST 43 1 1 /63 1 1 or HIST 43 1 2/ 
6312 or permission of department 
The major Greek sanctuaries and their physical re- 
mains, and the Greek religious calendar and its impor- 



Classics 



tant festivals, including the Olympic Games and the 
Panathanaia. 

CLAS 4030/6030. The Archaeology of the Greek 
Colonies. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or HIST 
2301 or HIST 3250 or HIST 4311/6311 or HIST 
4312/6312 or ARST 2310 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

The archaeology of the Greek colonies in Ionia, 
Magna Graecia, and the Black Sea area is examined to 
identify and explain the combination of Greek and in- 
digenous cultures in these areas on the fringes of the 
Greek world. 

CLAS 4040/6040. The Hellenistic World. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or HIST 
3250 or HIST 431 1/631 1 or HIST 4321/6321 or HIST 
4322/6322 or permission of department. 
Archaeology, art, culture, and history of Greece and 
the East from the rise of Alexander to Rome's annexa- 
tion of Egypt. 

CLAS 4100/6100. Ancient Cities of Greece and 
Rome. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
1010 or permission of department. 
Selected Greek and Roman cities and their architec- 
ture; principles upon which they are planned and laid 
out. Theories of Hippodamus and others, and the writ- 
ings of Vitruvius. Detailed study of the topography of 
Athens and Rome. 

CLAS 4110/6110. The Etruscans and Early Rome. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1010 or HIST 
3250 or HIST 4321/6321 or permission of department. 
The an and culture of the people of Northern Italy 
known as the Etruscans, with special attention to their 
relationship with the Greek world and their role in the 
development of Rome as a city. 

CLAS 4120/6120. Pompeii and Herculaneum: The 
Buried Cities. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1010 or HIST 
3250 or HIST 432 1/6321 or permission of department. 
Pompeii, Herculaneum. and the area destro\ed hs the 
eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Concentration will he on po- 
litical, social, religious, and economic life, combined 
with a stud> of the painting, sculpture, and architecture 
o\ the excavated cities and villas. 

CLAS 4130/6130. The \rch;uolog> of Rome's 
Proxinces. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1010 or CLAS 
(ANTH) 2(HK) or permission of department 
The archaeolog) ot the Western and/or Eastern 
prounces of the Roman Empire, concentrating on the 
major cities and sanctuaries and their physical re- 
mains. 

CLAS 4140/M40. Urhanlnu of Vunu and 

Roman ( arthaye. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite CLAS KKH) « CLAS 

I W 111) 2(MH)or permission ot department 



Gmdm I3f 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate corequisite: CLAS 4150/6150. 
The civilization of Roman North Africa from the Punic 
period through the Arab Conquest, using the important 
city of Carthage as a model. 

CLAS 4150/6150. Practicum in Classical Archaeol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1010 or CLAS 
(ANTH) 2000 or permission of department. 
Undergraduate corequisite: CLAS 4140/6140. 
All aspects of modern field archaeology on a classical 
site, including excavation techniques, the keeping of 
field records, and the classification and conservation 
of finds from the moment of recovery to their final dis- 
position in museums. 

CLAS 4200/6200. Ancient Comedy. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
1010 or CLAS 1020 or permission of department. 
Ancient comedy in English translation, concentrating 
on fifth-century Athens, and tracing its changing focus 
through Menander to Plautus and Terence; also con- 
sidered will be the theoretical basis of comedy as dis- 
cussed by Aristotle and others, as well as the place of 
comedy within the history of genres. 

CLAS 4210/6210. Ancient Tragedy. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

The conventions of classical tragedy as exemplified in 
the plays (in English translation) of the Greek drama- 
tists Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, as well as 
the Roman tragedian Seneca. 

CLAS 4220/6220. Roman Epic Poetry. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1010 or HIST 
3250 or HIST 4321/6321 or HIST 4322/6322 or per- 
mission of department. 

The epic poetry of ancient Rome with special empha- 
sis on Ennius, Vergil, and Lucan. The historical back- 
ground of epic will be examined and the poems will be 
read in English translation, some attention being given 
to Renaissance and modern translations. 

(CLAS)HIST 4225/6225. Medicine, Healing, and 
the Body in Ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours. 
The origins of the rationalist tradition in medicine; 
folk and cult methods of healing; the medical con- 
struction of gender differences; attitudes toward the 
body, including asceticism; and topics in the social 
history of medicine (such as childbirth, disease, and 
medical society) will be explored. 

CLAS 4230/6230. Classical Rhetoric. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
lOlOorSPCM ll(K). 

Classical rhetoric, with special attention to Plato, Aris- 
totle, and Cicero. 

CLAS 4240/6240. Theory and Analysis of Classical 
Mythology. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
1010 or CLAS 1020 or permission of department. 
The interpretation and analysis of ancient myths, par- 
ticularly those of Greece and Rome. 



CLAS 4250/6250. Ancient Novel. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
1010 or CLAS 1020 or permission of department. 
Ancient prose fiction (in English translation), includ- 
ing the Latin novels of Petronius and Apuleius and ex- 
amples of the Greek novel. Topics include the 
relationship between the novel and other literary gen- 
res, the social and intellectual background of the au- 
thors, the themes of love, travel, and magic, and the 
novel's audience. 

CLAS 4300/6300. Selected Topics in Ancient Civi- 
lization. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CLAS 1000 or CLAS 
1010 or permission of department. 
Special topics in the civilization of Greece and Rome. 
Topics will vary as demand requires. 

(CLAS)HIST 4312/6312. The Hellenistic World. 

3 hours. 

Problems in Hellenistic history from 330 B.C. to the 
Roman conquest with emphasis on the Antigonid, Se- 
leucid, and Ptolemaic dynasties. 

(CLAS)HIST 4320/6320. Law and Society in the 
Greco-Roman World. 3 hours. 
Law and its functions in ancient society from archaic 
Greece through the fifth century A.D. Includes discus 
sion of Greek, Roman, and Christian legal codes, legal 
procedure, and the theory of law; also of law as 
source for social history, especially issues of gender, 
class, crime, and the ancient economy. 

(CLAS)HIST 4321/6321. The Roman Republic. 

3 hours. 

Roman history to the end of the republic. 

(CLAS)HIST 4322/6322. The Roman Empire. 

3 hours. 

History of the Roman Empire from 27 B.C. to A.D. 
337 with special emphasis on the government of Au- 
gustus, reasons for its decline, and the final attempt at 
unification of the empire under Constantine. 

(CLAS)HIST 4329/6329. Studies in Ancient Greek 
and Roman History. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 
Topics in ancient history that vary by year and instruc- 
tor. Subject matter may include, for example, "The 
Hellenistic World"; "The Social History of the Roman 
Empire"; "Late Antiquity." 

(CLAS)LING 4610/6610. Sanskrit I. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The phonology, morphology, and syntax of the classi- 
cal Sanskrit language, emphasizing the position of 
Sanskrit within the Indo-European language family 
and its importance for Indo-European linguistics. 

(CLAS)UNG 4620/6620. Sanskrit II. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING(CLAS) 4610/6610. 



! 



140 / The University oj Georgia 



Continued studies in both the synchronic and dia- 
chronic grammar of classical Sanskrit. 

CLAS 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CLAS 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

CLAS 8000. Proseminar in Classics: Bibliography 
and Methods of Research. 1 hour. 
Methods, history, and bibliography in philology and 
other areas of the classics as a background to graduate 
study in Greek and/or Latin. 

CLAS 8010. Greek Civilization. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in Greek literature or civilization. 

CLAS 8020. Roman Civilization. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in Roman literature or civilization. 

Greek 

GREK 4010/6010. Homer. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 
Selections from the Iliad and/or the Odyssey. 

GREK 4020/6020. Hesiod. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Study of Hesiod's two surviving poems, the Theogony 
and the Works and Days, with special attention to the 
relationship of his language and religious thinking to 
that of Homer. 

GREK 4030/6030. Greek Lyric Poets. 3 hours. Re 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis 
sion of department. 

Selected Greek elegy and lyric, with attention to its 
political and social background, and to the relation ol 
these literary types to epic and dramatic poetry. 

GREK 4040/6040. Thucydides. 3 hours Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GRHK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 
The Peloponncsian War through selected readings. 

GREK 4050/6050. Aeschylus. 3 hours Repeatable 

for maximum 6 hours credit 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GRHK 2(K)2 or permis- 
sion of department. 



Aeschylus' plays, with emphasis on his theology and 
special uses of the Greek language. 

GREK 4060/6060. Sophocles. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Sophocles' plays, with emphasis on the poet's reli- 
gious and humanistic values and his dramatic style. 

GREK 4070/6070. Euripides. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Euripides' plays, with emphasis on the poet's dramatic 
style and his treatment of social, political, and reli- 
gious themes. 

GREK 4080/6080. Aristophanes. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Selected comedies of Aristophanes. Emphasis is 
placed on language, style, and thought, and on the 
generic characteristics of Greek Old Comedy. 

GREK 4090/6090. Advanced Readings: Plato. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The dialogues of Plato. Emphasis is placed on the lan- 
guage, style, and philosophical thought of Plato. 

GREK 4100/6100. Attic Orators. 3 hours Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Orations drawn from the works of Demosthenes, 
Lysias, and Aeschines, with emphasis on the function 
and techniques of persuasion in oratory and on the po- 
litical and social contexts of these orations. 

GREK(LATN)(LING) 4150/6150. Comparative 
Grammar of Greek and Latin. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010 or GREK 
2002 or permission of department. 
Graduate prerequisite: Pass on Classics Department 
Greek or Latin proficiency exam or permission of de- 
partment. 

The positions of Greek and Latin within the Indo-Eu- 
ropean language family with special attention to the 
phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from 
ProtO Indo Luropean. 

GREK 4200/6200. Readings in Selected Greek \u- 

thors. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite GREK 2002 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Seleeted Greek authors to be chosen according to the 
interests ol Students and instrueioi 

(,KI k 7000. Matter's Research. 1-9 hours Repeal 
able lor maximum 12 hours credit 
Prerequisite Permission of dep artm ent 



(i nullum- \< ht>»l Dest notion of Courses 141 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

GREK 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

GREK 8010. Readings and Research in Greek Lit- 
erature. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Intensive readings and research in Greek literature and 
pertinent critical readings; the topic examined will be 
determined by the student's prior training and inter- 
ests. 



Latin 

LATN 4010/6010. Roman Rhetoric. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the orations and rhetorical writings of 
Cicero, Quintilian, Seneca Rhetor, and others. 

LATN 4020/6020. Roman Epic Poetry. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the Latin epic poets Ennius, Vergil, 
Lucan, and others. 

LATN 4030/6030. Roman Historians. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from Roman historical writers such as Cae- 
sar, Sallust, Ammianus Marcellinus, and others. 

LATN 4040/6040. Roman Elegy. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the elegiac works of Tibullus/Sulpicia, 
Propertius, and Ovid, including studies in the cultural 
context of Roman poetry, as well as the development 
of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction. 

LATN 4050/6050. Roman Epistles. 3 hours. Repeat 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Pliny the 
Younger, and others. 

LATN 4060/6060. Roman Satire. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from such satirists as Horace, Juvenal, and 
others. 



LATN 4070/6070. Roman Drama. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, 
and the tragedies of Seneca, and others. 

LATN 4080/6080. Roman Didactic Poetry. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Vergil's 
Georgics, and others. The poet as teacher; the manner 
in which poetic form and imagery express philosophy. 

LATN 4090/6090. Latin of Later Antiquity and the 
Middle Ages. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from Latin authors of late antiquity and the 
Middle Ages. Study of Latin vocabulary and style dur- 
ing late antiquity and the Middle Ages. 

LATN 4100/6100. Roman Biography. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from Latin biographical authors such as 
Nepos, Suetonius, Tacitus, the Scriptores Historiae 
Augustae, and Einhard. 

(LATN)GREK(LING) 4150/6150. Comparative 
Grammar of Greek and Latin. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010 or GREK 
2002 or permission of department. 
Graduate prerequisite: Pass on Classics Department 
Greek or Latin proficiency exam or permission of de- 
partment. 

The positions of Greek and Latin within the Indo-Eu- 
ropean language family with special attention to the 
phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from 
Proto-Indo-European . 

LATN 4200/6200. Catullus. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the Carmina of Catullus, including 
studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well 
as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and 
diction. 

LATN 4210/6210. Horace. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the works of Horace, including studies 
in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the 
development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction. 

LATN 4220/6220. Ovid. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the Metamorphoses and non-elegiac 
works of Ovid, including studies in the cultural con- 



142 / The University of Georgia 



Comparative Literature 



ext of Roman poetry, as well as the development of 
^atin poetic form, meter, and diction. 

LATN 4300/6300. Cicero and the Roman Republic. 
J hours. 

Jndergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
loraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
(Headings from the orations and other works of Cicero, 
»uid from the works of Caesar, Sallust, and other con- 
emporary writers. 

LATN 4310/6310. Livy. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite; LATN 3010. 
3raduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the Ab Urbe Condita of Livy. with at- 
tention to literary and historical issues surrounding the 
author and his works. 

LATN 4320/6320. Tacitus. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings from the Annales, Historiae, and/or minor 
works of Tacitus, with attention to literary and histori- 
cal issues surrounding the author and his works. 

LATN 4400/6400. Advanced Readings in Latin. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LATN 3010. 
Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Readings in one or more Latin authors or genres. Top- 
ics to be selected on the basis of student needs. 

LATN 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

LATN 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

LATN 7770. Latin Teaching Apprenticeship. 

2 hours. 1 hour lecture and 1 hour lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

The teaching of elementary Latin at the college level; 
an introduction to methods and materials. Obterva- 
tions and practice teaching are required. 

LATN 8010. Readings and Research in Latin Prose. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Latin prose literature and pertinent critical writings 
The topic, author, or genre covered will be determined 
by the student's previous training and interests 

LATN 8020. Readings and Research in Latin Po- 
etry. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 
Latin poetic literature and pertinent critical unlinks 
The topic, author, or genre covered will be determined 
by the student's previous training and interests 



Comparative 
Literature 



Dorothy Figueira, Head 

James H. McGregor, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-0420 
(Joseph Brown Hall) 

Foreign language requirements: MA, fluent 
reading knowledge of one foreign language and 
reading competence in a second; PhD, fluent 
reading knowledge of two foreign languages and 
reading competence in a third. 

MA students are required to take five graduate 
courses (total 15 hours) in the Department of 
Comparative Literature and three graduate 
courses (total 9 hours) in other literature and lan- 
guage departments, for a total of 24 hours. PhD 
students are required to take six graduate 
courses (total 18 hours) in the Department of 
Comparative Literature and three graduate 
courses (total 9 hours) in other literature and lan- 
guage departments, plus CMLT 9300, for a total 
of 30 hours beyond the MA. 

The department webpage is located at: 
http://www.uga.edu/~cml/. 

CMLT 4050/6050. Literature and Ideas of Nature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Literary and philosophical texts of various historical 
periods that trace changes in how human beings un- 
derstand their non-human environment. 

CMLT 4070/6070. Renaissance European Litera- 
ture. 3 hours. 

Literature of Western Europe (Italian. French. Spanish, 
Germanic, and English) 1450-1600. with emphasis on 
literary types and pre\ ailing ideas. 

CMLT 4080/6080. Romantic European Literature. 
3 hours. 

The rise and de\elopment oi Romanticism in the eigh- 
teenth and nineteenth centuries, uith reading ot se 
lected literature and criticism. 

CMLT 4090/6090. Poetr>. 3 hours 

Lyric poetT) from the mid-nineteenth century to the 

present. 

CMLT 41(M)/M(M>. Mannerist and Baroque I itera 
ture. 3 hours. 

Literar) tonus and issues in Europe est. 1550 
with special mention to the intellectual background 
and the interrelationships b e t w e en literature .md other 
arts and sciences 



143 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



CMLT 4110/6110. Medieval European Literature. 

3 hours. 

The literatures of medieval Europe with emphasis on 
major literary genres and the philosophical and social 
presuppositions which inform them. 

CMLT 4120/6120. Eighteenth-Century European 
Literature. 3 hours. 

The literature of England, France, and Germany in the 
eighteenth century, with emphasis on literary types 
and prevailing ideas. 

CMLT 4150/6150. The Novel. 3 hours. 
The novel as a genre. Origins of prose fiction, theory 
of the novel, and representative readings of novels 
from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries will 
be included. 

CMLT 4200/6200. Literature and the Visual Arts. 

3 hours. 

Formal, philosophical, and thematic relationships be- 
tween literature and one or more of the visual arts in a 
given period. 

CMLT 4210/6210. Literature and Cinema. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Formal, philosophical, and thematic relationships be- 
tween literature and cinema. 

CMLT 4220/6220. East Asian Cinema. 3 hours. 
A survey of major works of East Asian cinema from 
literary, historical, cultural, and interdisciplinary per- 
spectives. 

CMLT 4250/6250. Drama. 3 hours. 

Drama as a genre from its beginnings to the present. 

CMLT 4300/6300. Modernism and Postmodernism. 

3 hours. 

Modernism and postmodernism as literary move- 
ments, with reading of selected literature and criti- 
cism. 

CMLT 4350/6350. Nineteenth-Century Literature. 

3 hours. 

Readings in major writers and works of nineteenth- 
century European and world literature. 

CMLT 4400/6400. East Central European Litera- 
ture and Culture. 3 hours. 

The works of major modern East Central European 
writers, with some attention to representative cinema. 

CMLT 4510/6510. Literature and Music. 3 hours. 
The forms, relationships, and aesthetics of music and 
literature. 

CMLT 4600/6600. Survey of East Asian Literature I. 

3 hours. 

Poetry, prose, and drama in traditional China and 

Japan. The works will be in English translation. 

CMLT 4610/6610. Survey of East Asian Literature II. 

3 hours. 

Poetry, prose, and drama in China and Japan from the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The works will be 
in English translation. 



CMLT 4620/6620. East Asian Novel. 3 hours. 
The major/minor novelists and their works, especiallj] 
those of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Th«j 
novels are in English translation. 

(CMLT)LING 4740/6740. Discourse Analysis. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or permission 1 
of department. 

An interdisciplinary study of language use, text analy- 
sis, and evaluation. The course will provide students 
with the ability to investigate and evaluate structural j 
features of language and to identify the strategies used ' 
by different writers based on style and cultural back- 
grounds. 

(CMLT)LING 4870/6870. Language, Gender, and* 
Culture. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The role of language and culture in the formation of 
philosophical assumptions about gender differentia- 
tion in society. 

CMLT 4880/6880. Survey of African Literature I 

3 hours. 

African literature from its ancient oral traditions to thei 
European colonial period based on works of African j 
authors written in English and English translations of 
the African works. 

CMLT 4890/6890. Survey of African Literature II. 

3 hours. 

African literature since the independence of the] 

African people from European colonial rule. 

CMLT 7000. Master's Research. 1-6 hours. Repeat- j 

able for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 

the direction of faculty members. 

CMLT 7100. Proseminar in Comparative Litera- 
ture. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 
A multiple-instructor course for graduate students in j 
Comparative Literature introducing the range of liter- 
atures and critical approaches which characterize the ] 
discipline and the department. 

CMLT 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-3 hours. Repeatable 

for maximum 12 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 

sor. 

CMLT 8020. Seminar in Literary Periods. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Specific literary period from an international perspec- 
tive, with emphasis on theoretical problems in peri- 
odi/.ation and the relationship of literature to other 
cultural institutions. 

CMLT 8030. Seminar in Literary Genres. 3 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 18 hours credit. 

Major genre, the epic in the literatures of Europe and 



144 /The University qj Georgia 



America, with particular attention to recent develop- 
nents in genre theory. 

:MLT 8040. Problems in Literary Translation. 

I hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Qie problems and principles of literary translation, 
vith emphasis on the practice of translation. 

:MLT 8130. Seminar in Special Topics. 3 hours Re- 
ntable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Selected topics in comparative studies, to be deter- 
hined by the course instructor. 

rMLT 8280. Problems in the History of Literary 

Criticism I. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 

redit. 

Jterary criticism from Classical Antiquity through the 

nid-eighteenth century with attention to the theoreti- 

;al issues and assumptions underlying the specific 

rritical problems. 

CMLT 8290. Problems in the History of Literary 
Criticism II. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
:redit. 

literary criticism from the late eighteenth century to 
ihe present. Particular attention will be paid to the the- 
oretical issues and assumptions underlying the specific 
critical problems under investigation. 

CMLT 8300. Seminar in Contemporary Literary 
Theory and Criticism. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department, 
literary theory and critical method, as exemplified by 
iiverse figures from a number of differing national 
and linguistic cultures. 

CMLT 8310. Seminar in East Central European 
Studies. 3 hours. 

ntellectual trends in their East Central European in- 
flection. The philosophical and ideological underpin- 
nings of the East Central European aesthetic and 
sociological thought and expression. 

CMLT 8400. Literature and Science. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Models of reality implicit in "scientific" and "literary" 
texts. 

CMLT 8500. Literature and Philosophy. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
The relationships between literature and philosophy, 
and in the philosophical issues that literature exam- 
ines. 

(CMLT)ENGL 8850. Seminar in Criticism and 

Theory. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

A problem in structuralism, poststructuralism. femi 

nism, psychoanalysis, Marxism. Nev. Historicism. ga> 

and lesbian studies, postmodernism, postcolonialism, 

or cultural studies; or of a major literal \ theorist. 



Computer Science 



CMLT 8980. Readings in Comparative Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Independent reading with regular conferences and re- 
ports, in some aspects of comparative literature. 

CMLT 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat 

able for maximum 18 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 

the direction of faculty members. 

CMLT 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Japanese 



JPNS 4500/6500. Readings in Japanese Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: JPNS 3020. Selected readings of Japan- 
ese literature in the original language. Texts will vary, 
with focus on readings of works of literature and dis- 
cussion of issues in literary criticism in Japanese. 



Computer Science 

E. Rodney Canfield, Head 

John A. Miller, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2911 
(Boyd Graduate Studies Research Center) 

The Computer Science Department offers three 
distinct graduate programs: Doctor of Philoso- 
phy (PhD), Master of Science (MS), and Master 
of Applied Mathematical Sciences (MAMS). A 
closely affiliated program is offered by the Arti- 
ficial Intelligence Center; please see their sec- 
tion in this bulletin. Financial aid possibilities 
for graduate students include departmental 
teaching assistantships, departmental research 
assistantships. and university-wide assistant- 
ships. 

The PhD degree in computer science is an ad- 
vanced, intensive program designed to take stu- 
dents to the frontier of knowledge in both the 
theorv and practice of Computet Science. The 
program prepares students for careers in re- 
search (at universities, government, or industrial 
research labs), teaching at colleges or universi- 
ties, or advanced development at hardware or 
Software companies I ho department presently 
has active research groups in theory, distributed 



Graduate St //<><>/ /)< s< ription «»/ < < -m^ i 145 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



information systems, image processing, parallel 
processing, computational science, computa- 
tional biology, artificial intelligence, computer 
architecture, and modeling and simulation. Ad- 
mission to this program is highly selective: con- 
sideration for admission into the PhD program 
requires a baccalaureate degree or master's de- 
gree with a major in computer science or an al- 
lied discipline, Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) test scores (including the subject test in 
computer science), three letters of recommenda- 
tion, and a one-page personal statement outlin- 
ing the applicant's background, achievements, 
and future goals. Students with insufficient 
background in computer science can apply for 
one of the master's level programs (MS or 
MAMS). 

The MS degree in computer science is a com- 
prehensive program of study intended to give 
qualified and motivated students a thorough 
foundation in the theory, methodology, and tech- 
niques of computer science. Students who suc- 
cessfully complete this program of study will 
have a grasp of the principles and foundations of 
computer science. They will be prepared to pur- 
sue higher academic goals, including the PhD 
degree. They will obtain skills and experience in 
up-to-date approaches to analysis, design, im- 
plementation, validation, and documentation of 
computer software and hardware. With these 
skills they will be well qualified for technical, 
professional, or managerial positions in govern- 
ment, business, industry, and education. Admis- 
sion to this program is selective: consideration 
for admission into the MS program requires a 
baccalaureate degree preferably with a major in 
computer science or an allied discipline. Gradu- 
ate Record Examination (GRE) test scores, three 
letters of recommendation, and a one-page per- 
sonal statement outlining the applicant's back- 
ground, achievements, and future goals. Though 
not required for admission, the subject test in 
computer science must be taken before complet- 
ing the MS degree. Students with insufficient 
background in computer science must take un- 
dergraduate computer science courses in addi- 
tion to their graduate program to remedy any 
deficiencies. 

The MAMS is a professional master's degree 
program designed tor students who seek a broad 
training in applied quantitative methods as 
preparation for professional employment in 
business, government, or industry. The student 
takes a core curriculum of courses from four 
participating departments: Computer Science, 
Mathematics, and Statistics in the Franklin Col- 



lege of Arts and Sciences; and Management 
Science in the Terry College of Business. The 
student may complete a degree with an interdis- 
ciplinary program of study which allows combi- 
nation of expertise in computation with a chosen 
field of application. The degree is designed to 
meet the need for technical specialists who can 
use computation, applied mathematics, opera- 
tions research, and statistics to solve complex, 
quantitative, real-world problems. Admission to 
the MAMS program is selective; applicants 
must have a baccalaureate degree in a quantita- 
tive discipline and have taken introductory 
courses in computer science, mathematics, and 
statistics. Applicants must submit the same in- 
formation as applicants for the MS degree. 

Please note that in addition to the require- 
ments of the Department of Computer Science, 
applicants must satisfy all requirements of the 
Graduate School as noted in this bulletin. 

CSCI 4050/6050. Software Engineering. 4 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720. 
Full cycle of a software system development effort, 
including requirements definition, system analysis, de- 
sign, implementation, and testing. Special emphasis is 
placed on system analysis and design. The design 
phase includes development of a user interface. A 
large term project incorporates the full software life 
cycle. 

CSCI 4140/6140. Numerical Methods and Comput- 
ing. 4 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 1302 and MATH 
2210 and MATH 22 10L. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 
3000. 

Numerical methods and computing. Topics include: 
computer arithmetic; numerical solutions of nonlinear 
equations; polynomial interpolation; numerical differ- 
entiation and integration: numerical solutions of sys- 
tems of linear equations, initial and boundary value 
problems, systems of ordinary differential equations, 
spline functions, and the method of least squares. 

CSCI 4210/6210. Simulation and Modeling. 4 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720. 
The modeling and simulation of existing or planned 
systems for the purpose of studying their correctness, 
reliability, or performance. Topics to be addressed in- 
clude discrete-event simulation, continuous simula- 
tion, analysis and modeling methodologies, animation, 
virtual reality, and Web-based simulation. 

CSCI 4350/6350. Global Information Systems. 

4 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 4370/6370 or CSCI 

4570/6570. 

Provides intermediate to advanced understanding of 

the use of Internet, World Wide Web, and network 

computing (including Java) technologies for manage- 



146 / The University of 'Georgia 



Computer Science 



ment (search, access, integration, presentation) of mul- 
timedia information. Topics discussed include key 
techniques, tools and technologies for creating such 
systems, developing novel applications, and their im- 
pact on business. 

CSCI 4370/6370. Database Management. 4 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720. 
The theory and practice of database management. Top- 
ics to be covered include efficient file access tech- 
niques, the relational data model as well as other data 
models, query languages, database design using en- 
tity-relationship diagrams and normalization theory, 
query optimization, and transaction processing. 

CSCI 4470/6470. Algorithms. 4 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720 and CSCI 2670. 
Algorithms, covering basic analysis techniques, basic 
design techniques (divide-and-conquer, dynamic pro- 
gramming, greedy, and branch-and-bound), basic 
graph algorithms, and NP-completeness. 

CSCI 4490/6490. Algorithms for Computational Bi- 
ology. 4 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 4470/6470 or per- 
mission of department. 

Application of discrete algorithms to computational 
problems in molecular biology. Topics are drawn from 
such areas as classical sequence comparison, multiple 
sequence alignment, DNA sequence assembly, DNA 
physical mapping, genome rearrangement, evolution- 
ary tree construction, and protein folding. Background 
in molecular biology is not required. 

CSCI 4500/6500. Programming Languages. 4 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 1302. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: CSCI 2720. 
Several modern programming languages and the para- 
digm — procedural programming, object-oriented pro- 
gramming, functional programming, and logic 
programming — that each strives to accommodate. 
Projects involve at least three languages. 

CSCI 4520/6520. Functional Programming. 4 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720 and CSCI 
(MATH) 2610. 

The functional programming paradigm: functions and 
types, type inference and polymorphism, higher order 
functions and recursion, evaluation strategies, abstract 
data types and modules, lists, trees, and la/y data 
Structures, reasoning about functional programs 

CSCI(ARTI) 4540/6540. Symbolic Programming. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI \M)2 or permission 

of department. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: (St I 

{ML) 4550/6550. 

Programming in LISP and PROLOG, with emphasis 

on artificial intelligence techniques. Other languages 

used for artificial intelligence work will be presented 

more briefly. 



CSCI(PHIL) 4550/6550. Artificial Intelligence. 

3 hours. 

The artificial intelligence approach to modeling cogni- 
tive processes. Topics include an introduction to 
heuristic methods, problem representation and search 
methods, classic AI techniques, and a review of the 
controversial issues of the AI paradigm of cognition as 
computation. 

CSCI 4570/6570. Compilers. 4 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 4720/6720. 
Design and implementation of compilers for high- 
level programming languages. Topics include all 
phases of a typical compiler, including scanning, pars- 
ing, semantic analysis, intermediate code generation, 
code optimization, and code generation. Students de- 
sign and develop a compiler for a small programming 
language. Emphasis is placed on using compiler de- 
velopment tools. 

(CSCI)MATH 4630/6630. Mathematical Analysis 
of Computer Algorithms. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 3000 and (MATH 
3200 or CSCI(MATH) 2610). 

Discrete algorithms (number-theoretic, graph-theo- 
retic, combinatorial, and algebraic) with an emphasis 
on techniques for their mathematical analysis. 

(CSCI)MATH 4670/6670. Combinatorics. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500) and (MATH 3200 or CSCI(MATH) 2610). 
Basic counting principles: permutations, combina- 
tions, probability, occupancy problems, and binomial 
coefficients. More sophisticated methods include gen- 
erating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion/ex- 
clusion principle, and the pigeonhole principle. 
Additional topics include asymptotic enumeration, 
Polya counting theory, combinatorial designs, coding 
theory, and combinatorial optimization. 

(CSCI)MATH 4690/6690. Graph Theory. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500) and (MATH 3200 or CSCl(MATH) 2610). 
Elementary theory of graphs and digraphs Topics in- 
clude connectivity, reconstruction, trees. I. tiler's prob- 
lem, hamiltonicity. network flows, planarity, node and 
edge colorings, tournaments, matehings. and extremal 
graphs. A number of algorithms and applications are 
included. 

CSCI 4720/6720. Computer Architecture and Or- 
ganization. 4 hours 
Prerequisite CSCI 2o70. 
Corequisite: CSCI 2720. 

Structure and function ol modern computing systems 
Topics studied include combinational and sequential 
logic number systems and computer arithmetic, hard 
ware design and organization ol en . I/O swans and 

memof) systems, instruction set and BSSembl) lan- 
guage design, and current trends and developments in 
computer architecture and organization. 

t SCI 4730/6730. Operating System*. 4 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ( S '-720. 



Graduate School De» >ip: 147 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Coverage of the key concepts in modern operating sys- 
tems. Specific topics include process management, 
synchronization mechanisms, scheduling strategies, 
deadlock detection/avoidance, memory management, 
file systems, protection and security, and distributed 
systems. Concepts will be reinforced through pro- 
gramming projects using a realistic operating system. 

CSCI 4760/6760. Computer Networks: Technology 
and Applications. 4 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720 and CSCI 2670. 
In-depth coverage of computer networks, including: 
digital data transmission and encoding, layered proto- 
col models, Internet protocol, Internet client-server 
software, and network design methodology. Topics 
also include discussion of recent network technolo- 
gies, legal, corporate and public-interest aspects and 
case studies involving public and private enterprises. 

CSCI 4810/6810. Computer Graphics. 4 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 2720 and CSCI 2670. 
Principles of two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
interactive raster graphics. Principles of scan conver- 
sion algorithms for two-dimensional and three-dimen- 
sional graphics primitives; data structures and 
modeling techniques for raster graphics; interaction, 
visual realism, animation and user interface design; 
ray tracing, illumination, shading, data storage/re- 
trieval, software engineering and parallel computing 
for graphics. 

CSCI 4900/6900. Special Topics in Computer Sci- 
ence. 1 -4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Various advanced topics in Computer Science. 

CSCI 4950/6950. Directed Study in Computer Sci- 
ence. 1-4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours 
credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Content will vary in response to the interests, needs, 
and capability of the students and faculty involved. 
Individual, guided study in computer science. 

CSCI 50M0/7080-5080IJ7080L. Personal Computer 

System Administration. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 
2 hours lab per week 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 1 100-1 100L. 
Management of Windows and Macintosh computer 
systems. Topics covered include configuration, back- 
ups, hardware and software troubleshooting, and set 
ting up lor Internet access Hands-on laboratory 

emphasized. 

CSCI 6610. Automata and Formal Languages. 

4 hours. 

Prerequiiil 670. 

The fundamental limitations on mechanized computa- 
tion In the tirst pan of the course, the emphasis is on 
possible versus impossible computations. Three 
classes ol languages ait considered: regular, context 
tree, and recursively enumerable. In the second part of 



the course the emphasis shifts to possible versus feasi- 
ble computations. 

CSCI 7000. Master's Research. 1-5 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 25 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CSCI 7010. Computer Programming. 4 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113. 

Algorithms, programs, and computing systems. Topics 
studied include: fundamental techniques of program 
development and supportive software tools; and pro- 
gramming projects and applications in a structured 
computer language. Hands-on experience using micro- 
computers. 

CSCI 7100. Technical Report. 1-5 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Preparation of a technical report to satisfy require- 
ments for the MAMS degree. 

CSCI 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-5 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

CSCI 8050. Knowledge-Based Systems. 4 hours 
Prerequisite: CSCI(PHIL) 4550/6550 or CSCI(PHIL) 
8650 or permission of department. 
Theory and practice of knowledge-based system 
construction. Topics will include knowledge-based 
construction, inference engines, reasoning from in- 
complete or uncertain information, and user interfaces. 

CSCI 8060. Advanced Software Engineering. 4 hours. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 4050/6050 and CSCI 4370/6370. 
Analysis of advanced methods in software engineer- 
ing. Emphasis is placed on formal specification meth- 
ods, advanced software testing, software reuse, 
distributed software design, and communication proto- 
col specification. Studies include advanced software 
development tools and systems. 

CSCI 8140. Parallel Processing and Computational 
Science. 4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4140/6140 and CSCI 4720/6720. 
Topics include computer architectures, interconnec- 
tion networks, basic concepts in parallel computing, 
parallel algorithms, matrix multiplications, solving 
systems of equations, parallel direct and iterative 
methods, programming on different parallel architec- 
tures, and applications 

CSCI 8350. Enterprise Integration. 4 hours. 
Prerequisite: (CSCI 4370/6370 or CSCI 4570/6570) 
and permission of department. 

Technical information management aspects of enter- 
prise integration using recent advances in workflow 
management, database management, distributed sys- 
tems, and information systems areas of computer 
science. Topics include federated/multidatabase archi- 



148 /The University <>\ Georgia 



Computer Science 



tectures and systems for integration of distributed, het- 
erogeneous, and autonomous databases, business 
process modeling and workflow automation. Large 
group project. 

CSCI 8370. Advanced Database Systems. 4 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 4370/6370 and CSCI 4730/6730. 
Advanced study of database systems. The course fo- 
cuses on concepts, algorithms and technologies for re- 
lational, object-oriented and distributed database 
systems. Related technologies such as data ware- 
houses and repositories will also be covered. 

CSCI 8470. Advanced Algorithms. 4 hours. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 4470/6470 and CSCI 6610. 
Further study of fundamental algorithms. Topics cov- 
ered include advanced data structures, graph algo- 
rithms, string algorithms, geometric algorithms, 
parallel algorithms, and approximation algorithms for 
NP-complete problems. 

CSCI(LING) 8570. Natural Language Processing 
Techniques. 4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI(ARTI) 4540/6540 and LING 8150. 
Human language from a computational point of view; 
algorithms and techniques for computer understanding 
of human-language input. 

CSCI 8610. Topics in Theoretical Computer Sci- 
ence. 4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4470/6470 and CSCI 6610. 
Advanced topics in theoretical computer science. The 
selection of topics varies from year to year. Areas may 
include, but are not limited to, denotational semantics, 
complexity theory, recursion theory, and discrete algo- 
rithms. 

CSCI(PHIL) 8650. Logic and Logic Programming. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: [CSCI(ARTI) 4540/6540 and PHIL(LING) 
6430] or permission of department. 
Theoretical foundations of automated reasoning and 
logic programming. Topics covered include preposi- 
tional logic, predicate logic, first-order models, resolu- 
tion principles, logic programming paradigms, 
nonmonotonic reasoning. 

CSCI 8720. Advanced Computer Architecture. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4730/6730 or pemission of depart- 
ment. 

Advanced and high-performance computer architec- 
ture. Topics covered include hierarchical memorv 
design, cache memory design, pipelining, vector pro- 
cessing and parallel processing Case Studies of vector 
processors and multi-processor architectures: shared 
memory, distributed memory, data parallel iSIMDi 
and control parallel (MIMD) architectures, and hetcro 
geneous parallel computing on a network of worksta- 
tions. 



CSCI 8730. Software Systems for Parallel and Dis- 
tributed Computing. 4 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 4730/6730. 
Software systems geared at supporting parallel and 
distributed computing. Programming language sup- 
port will focus on simple and efficient ways to express 
parallel programs. Compiler and operating system 
support will focus on new optimizations to make par- 
allel programs execute more efficiently. 

CSCI 8750. Principles of VLSI Systems Design. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4370/6370 and CSCI 4720/6720. 
Methods and computer tools used in the design of in- 
tegrated electronics devices: layout, simulate, verify, 
and performance. Students will do a project design. 

CSCI 8770. Computer-Aided Design. 4 hours 
Prerequisite: CSCI 8750. 

Computer-aided design systems, with emphasis on de- 
signer-system interaction, Algorithms and systems for 
synthesis, analysis, optimization by criteria, simula- 
tion, and testing. 

CSCI 8810. Image Processing and Computer 
Graphics. 4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4810/6810 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Image processing and computer graphics. Topics in- 
clude: image representation, restoration, transforma- 
tion, classification, compression, enhancement, 
segmentation, image filter, design, histogram tech- 
niques, sampling and quantization, Fast Fourier Trans- 
form, image data structures, parallel/distributed 
processing, illumination models and surface-rendering 
methods. A number of applications will be presented 
as case studies. 

CSCI 8820. Computer Vision and Pattern Recogni- 
tion. 4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4810/6810 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Low-level and high-level vision including edge detec- 
tion, connected component labeling, boundary detec- 
tion, segmentation, stereopsis. motion analysis, and 
object recognition. Knowledge representation, knowl- 
edge retrieval and reasoning techniques in computer 
vision. Parallel computing, parallel architectures and 
neural computing for computer vision 

CSCI(ENGR) 8940. Computational Intelligence. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI(PHIL) 4550/6550 or permission of 

department 

Programs that solve complex problems in a particular 
domain, tvpicallv independent Of knowledge used to 
direct the search tor an optimal solution. Approaches 
include simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, 
neural networks 

CSCI 8990. Research Seminar. 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 



{inuluiitf School /)ck nniiori i>t Count i 149 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Weekly research seminar. Students must attend and 
give at least one presentation at the seminar. 

CSCI 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

CSCI 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Drama and Theatre 



Farley Richmond, Head 

Franklin J. Hildy, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2836 
(Fine Arts Building) 

Graduate work in drama and theatre is offered in 
the areas of history and theory of theatre and the 
dramatic arts for the PhD degree and in the cre- 
ative and technical aspects of stage, film, TV, 
and digital media for the MFA degree. Facilities 
include four theatres, video production and edit- 
ing areas, and an exceptional computer anima- 
tion/ CAD laboratory. Extensive library 
facilities and cooperative research arrangements 
with cognate departments are available. 

Prospective students who desire financial aid 
should complete their application with the De- 
partment of Drama and Theatre before February 
15. 

DRAM 4000/6000. Dramatic Writing I. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3020. 
Planning, writing, and polishing the short script tor 
pe rf ormance. 

DRAM 4250/6250. History of Cinema I. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 2120. 
The development of the international film and of film 
theories from 1895 to 1945, with emphasis on cinema 
as a dramatic medium. 

DRAM 4260/6260. History of Cinema II. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 2 1 20. 

The development ol international film and film thco- 
nes from 1945 to the present, with emphasis on cm 
cma as | dramatic medium. 

(DRAM)TXMI 4270/6270. History of Costume: 
Antiquity to Nineteenth Century, i hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department 



Interrelationships of costume and social, cultural, po- 
litical, and economic environments from antiquity to 
the nineteenth century. 

DRAM 4280/6280. Women in Performance. 3 hours. 
Women's contributions to the performing arts, focus- 
ing on contemporary American artists in such fields as 
theatre, film, dance, performance art, and other con- 
temporary performance genres. 

DRAM 4330/6330. Shakespeare. 3 hours. 6 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3500 or permis- 
sion of department. 
Performance of Shakespeare's plays. 

DRAM 4400/6400. Asian Theatre and Drama. 

3 hours. 

Genres of performance in India, China, Japan, and 
Southeast Asia. Focus on social and cultural signifi- 
cance of performances, including examples of Noh, 
Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Kathakali, Kutiyattam, 
Wayang Kulit, and Topeng. 

DRAM 4460/6460. History of Dramatic Art in Italy. 

3 hours. 

Dramatic art in Italy and England from the Greek 
colonists to the present. Special emphasis on field trips 
to archaeological sites and special museums. Visits to 
contemporary performances. 

DRAM 4480/6480. History of African American 
Drama and Theatre. 3 hours. 
The emergence of a distinct and conscious African 
American theatre in the United States. 

(DRAM)AFAM 4490/6490. African American 
Women in Cinema: Image and Aesthetics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected films by and about African and African 
American women. A historical/critical overview of the 
presentation of these women in cinema with emphasis 
on contemporary African and African American 
women film makers. 

DRAM 4800/6800. Topics in History. 3 hours. Re- 

peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Topical issues in theatre or cinema, combining history 

and critical analysis of specific significant topics (e.g., 

national theatre or cinema, animation, authorship, 

genre). 

DRAM 5110/7110. Stage Management. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A survey Of the organization and practical application 
and execution of performance events. 

DRAM 5310/7310. Technical Problems. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3340. 
Special topics in advanced theory and techniques of 
performance technology, including scenery construc- 
tion and rigging, costume construction, lighting tech- 
nology, and sound. 



ISO /The University oj Georgia 



Drama and Theatre 



DRAM 5320/7320. Computer-Aided Design for the 
Performance Arts. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300 and permis- 
sion of department. 

Techniques of computer-aided design and drafting in 
the performing arts. 

DRAM 5330/7330. Costume Design for the Perfor- 
mance Arts. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300. 
Costume design for the performing arts, emphasizing 
conceptualization and application for basic research 
and technology to meet dramatic needs. 

DRAM 5340/7340. History of Costume and Decor. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300. 

The styles of costuming, architecture, furnishing, and 

ornamentation in significant theatrical periods. 

DRAM 5351/7351. Scenic Design for the Perfor- 
mance Arts. 3 hours. 9 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300. 
Undergraduate prerequisite orcorequisite: DRAM 3300. 
Scenic design for the performing arts, emphasizing 
conceptualization and application for basic research 
and technology to meet dramatic needs. 

DRAM 5352/7352. Lighting Design for the Perfor- 
mance Arts. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300. 
Lighting design for the performing arts, emphasizing 
conceptualization and application for basic research 
and technology to meet dramatic needs. 

DRAM 5380/7380. Design Technology for the Per- 
formance Arts. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300. 
Basic technology for performance production. Cos- 
tume materials and construction, scenery rigging and 
movement, lighting equipment and technology, and 
sound equipment and practices. 

DRAM 5480/7480. Topics in Design. 3 hours Re 

peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 6 hours lab per 

week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

A special topics course in theatre design. 

DRAM 5481/7481. Topics in Cinema. 3 hours. Re 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 3 hours lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 2120. 
Special topics course in cinema studies, combining 
history and critical analysis of specific topics (anima- 
tion, national cinema, authorship, genre). 

DRAM 5580y7580. Performance Topics. 3 hours 

6 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission ot department. 

Selected performance topics and theories 

DRAM 5610/7610. Play Direction Laboratory. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 5600. 



The director's analysis of the script, the actor-director 
relationship, and theatrical style. Each student directs 
a one-act play or short film. 

DRAM 5620/7620. Dramatic Writing II. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 4000/6000. 
Developing the full length script for performance. 

DRAM 5630/7630. Producing the New Script 3 hours. 
6 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Critical and practical work in producing new scripts 
for writers, actors, directors, and designers. 

DRAM 5640/7640. Directing for the Cinema. 3 hours. 
6 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 5600 or permis- 
sion of department. 
Theories and techniques of the dramatic cinema. 

DRAM 5680/7680. Topics in Dramatic Writing. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A special topics course in dramatic writing. 

DRAM 5730/7730. Advanced Costume Design for 
the Performance Arts. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 5330/7330. 
Projects in costume design for the performing arts, 
emphasizing multi-character and highly complex de- 
signs using traditional and complex methods and tech- 
nologies. 

DRAM 5751/7751. Advanced Scenic Design for the 
Performance Arts. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 5351/7351. 
Advanced scenic design for the performing arts, em- 
phasizing multi-character and highly complex designs 
using traditional and complex methods and technolo- 
gies. 

DRAM 5752/7752. Advanced Lighting Design for 
the Performance Arts. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 5352/7352. 
Projects in design (scenery, costume, lighting, sound) 
with an emphasis on multi-character, multi-setting and 
highly complex designs using current and advanced 
methods and technologies. 

DRAM 5810/7810. Computer Animation for Dra- 
matic Media I. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 3300 and permis- 
sion of department. 

Computer animation in television, film, and theatre 
from the perspective Of the director/animator. The 
hardware and software necessar\ to create computer 
animation is accompanied b\ the principles of kinetics 
and narrative story-telling in a visual medium. 

DRAM 5820/7820. Computer Animation for Dra- 
matic Media II. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite DRAM 5810/7810 or per- 
mission ol department. 

Advanced computer animation techniques and digital 
compositing winch integrate live action with computer 
generated environments. 



Graduate School Dest ription oj ( 151 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



DRAM 5830/7830. Computer Animation for Dra- 
matic Media III. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: DRAM 5820/7820 or per- 
mission of department. 

Preparation of a portfolio-quality computer animation 
project, including a narrative script story book, pre- 
production meetings, schedules and budgets, produc- 
tion and post-production. 

DRAM 5860/7860. Interactive Multimedia as a 
Dramatic Medium. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Practice and theory of interactive multimedia as a dra- 
matic medium. Multimedia hardware and software, 
principles of interactive design, and comparison of de- 
velopment tools and delivery systems including CD- 
ROM and the World Wide Web. 

DRAM 5870/7870. Interactive Multimedia and 
Live Performance. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

The use of computers to trigger and manipulate media 
events, including sound, lighting, digital images and 
video, and techniques allowing performers and specta- 
tors to interact with such media events in real time. 
Topics include sensors, motion capture, MIDI, and 
theoretical issues concerning the interaction between 
live performance and media. 

DRAM 6200. Theatre History I. 3 hours. 
Historiography, criticism, and theory of theatre from 
its beginnings to ca. 1800. 

DRAM 6210. Theatre History II. 3 hours 
Historiography, criticism, and theory of theatre from 
ca. 1 800 to the present. 

DRAM 6290. Dramatic Analysis and Criticism. 

3 hours. 

Dramatic art applied to script analysis and perfor- 
mance criticism. 

DRAM 6510. Introduction to Graduate Studies in 

Drama. I hour. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Resources and methods for graduate level research in 

theatre and dramatic media. 

DRAM 7050. Applied Drama Laboratory. 1 hour. 

Kepeatable for maximum 2 hours credit. 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Individually assigned production and/or performance 
crew. Open only to drama majors. 

DRAM 7060. Applied Drama Laboratory. 1 hour 
Repeatable tor maximum 2 hours credit 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Individually assigned production and/or performance 
crew. Open only to drama majors. 



DRAM 7070. Applied Drama Laboratory. 1 hour. 
Repeatable for maximum 2 hours credit. 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Individually assigned production and/or performance 
crew. Open only to drama majors. 

DRAM 7210. MFA Project. 3 hours 
MFA thesis project. 

DRAM 7370. Design Studio. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 6 hours credit. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Methods of rendering designs, painting scenery, creat- 
ing working drawings and models of scenery, cos- 
tumes and lights for stage, film, and television. 

DRAM 7511. Actor Training I: The Physical Actor I. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Physical techniques for the actor. 

DRAM 7512. Actor Training I: The Physical Actor II. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: DRAM 7511 and permission of depart- 
ment. 

Physical techniques for the actor in dealing with the 
differing demands of stage, film, and electronic media. 

DRAM 7521. Actor Training n: Voice for the Actor I. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Voice techniques for the actor. 

DRAM 7522. Actor Training II: Voice for the Actor 

II. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: DRAM 7521 and permission of depart- 
ment. 

Voice techniques for the actor in relation to the needs 
of stage, film, and electronic media. 

DRAM 7540. Characterization for the Actor. 

3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: (DRAM 7512 or DRAM 7521) and per- 
mission of department. 

Role analysis and the problems and techniques of cre- 
ating subtext with special relation to text and improvi- 
sation. 

DRAM 7550. Acting in Period Styles. 3 hours. 
6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: DRAM 7522 and permission of depart- 
ment. 

Problems ami techniques of acting in periods and 
st\les through intensive scene study and performance. 

DRAM 7560. Projects in Drama. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able lor maximum 6 hours credit. 3 hours lab per 

week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced projects in dramatic performance. 

DRAM 7570. Acting for the Camera. 3 hours. 6 
hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: (DRAM 7522 or DRAM 7540) and per- 
mission of department. 
Applying theatre acting techniques to the demands of 



152 / The University <>l Georgia 






modern media. Practical work in class with emphasis 
on the vocal and physical demands of dramatic mater- 
ial designed for television and cinema. 

DRAM 7590. Realism in Performance. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Performance techniques and challenges in realistic 

drama. 

DRAM 7970. Design Portfolio. 3 hours. 3 hours lab 
per week. 

Prerequisite: Two of the following: DRAM 5730/7730 
or DRAM 5751/7751 or DRAM 5752/7752. 
Independent projects in scenery, costume, or lighting 
design, aimed at fully developing a presentation port- 
folio. 

DRAM 8030. Seminar in Dramatic Writing. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dramatic form and style concentrating on specific 
problems and writers. 

DRAM 8100. Seminar in Critical Methods. 3 hours. 
Not open to students with credit in DRAM 6100. 
A comparison of current critical approaches to theatre 
and performance. 

DRAM 8200. Seminar in History of the Perfor- 
mance Arts. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in the study of stage, cinema, and media his- 
tory. 

DRAM 8300. Seminar in Design for the Perfor- 
mance Arts. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in visual design for the performing arts. 

DRAM 8400. Seminar in Dramatic Theory and 

Criticism. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Problems in the study of dramatic theory and criticism 

for stage, cinema, and media. 

DRAM 9000. Doctoral Research. 1 9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree, under 
the direction of faculty members. 

DRAM 9010. Research Seminar and Special Prob- 
lems in the Performance Arts I. 3-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Individually directed study under faculty supemsion 
on research problems in drama, theatre, and media. 

DRAM 9020. Research Seminar and Special Prob- 
lems in the Performance Arts II. 1-3 hours Repeat 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 



Ecology 



Individually directed study under faculty supervision 
on research problems in drama, theatre, and media. 

DRAM 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Ecology 



C. Ronald Carroll, Director 

William K. Fitt, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-3404 
(Ecology Building) 

For more than thirty years, the Institute of Ecol- 
ogy has been a center for interdisciplinary team 
research which deals holistically with humans 
and the environment. Recently the School of 
Ecology was formed, and all degrees are now of- 
fered through this academic unit. 

The PhD degree allows students to develop a 
broad background in ecology and related disci- 
plines. All requirements for admission are the 
same as for the Graduate School with the excep- 
tion of the GRE score. The minimum required 
GRE score for admission for the PhD degree is 
1100. As part of the curriculum, students must 
take ECOL 8000, Topics in Modern Ecology, 
but the remainder of the program of study is de- 
signed to fit the individual needs of the student. 
Facilities of the Institute of Ecology, and at off- 
campus facilities such as the Savannah River 
Ecology Laboratory, the Joseph Jones Ecologi- 
cal Research Center, the Coweeta Hydrologic 
Laboratory, the University of Georgia Marine 
Institute, and elsewhere, provide students un- 
usual opportunities for ecological training. The 
program has attracted outstanding students and 
produced exceptionally talented ecological sci- 
entists, many of whom are now leaders in the 
field. 

A MS degree program to ecolog) was re- 
cently approved by the Board of Regents. It is 
focused on training in the natural environment, 
as well as the integration o\' natural and socio 
economic systems. Students address speciall) 
selected research topics which are amenable to a 
two-year training activity. These topics require 
that they learn research design and encourage 
the use ol special skills, monitoring techniques. 

analysis, and interpretation of ecological/envi- 

ronmental data. Graduate students set their re- 



Craduate School Description of ( 'oufSi I 153 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



suits into the context of ecological and human 
ecology. Another degree offered is the MS in 
conservation ecology and sustainable develop- 
ment. This is an integrative training program 
which provides field experience and teaches 
skills and conceptual approaches that are essen- 
tial to successful efforts in conservation and en- 
vironmentally sustainable development. The 
principal components of the training program in- 
clude: core courses to provide breadth in con- 
ceptual approaches; program flexibility to allow 
students the opportunity to emphasize social- 
economic aspects or natural science aspects 
without sacrificing either; active involvement in 
a seminar series that stresses multi-disciplinary 
efforts and collaboration on projects; and oppor- 
tunities for field experience in addressing envi- 
ronmental problems. We expect that graduates 
of this program will be competitive for mid- 
level management positions in public and pri- 
vate stewardship organizations such as the 
National Park Service or the Nature Conser- 
vancy. The master's degree option also provides 
a sound interdisciplinary base for pursuing a 
more specialized doctoral program. 

A certificate in Conservation Ecology and 
Sustainable Development is also offered. Stu- 
dents enrolled in other graduate programs at the 
University of Georgia are eligible to apply. This 
option is designed to meet the needs of profes- 
sionals in such fields as law, forestry, and engi- 
neering who may wish to develop an 
environmental specialization in their profes- 
sional field. This option includes the coursework 
that is available in the master's degree program 
but does not require fieldwork or research. 

For a description of the MS and PhD interdis- 
ciplinary program in toxicology, see the section 
in this bulletin entitled. General Degrees: Inter- 
disciplinary Program. 

ECOL 4000/6000. Population and Community 

Ecology. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LCOL(BIOL) 3500- 

3500Land MATH 2210. 

The birth, death, and movement of organisms, with 

particular reference to population dynamics, the fortes 

that structure communities of plants and animals. 

ECOL 4010/6010. Ecosystem Ecology. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: !.( Ol.i BIOL) 3500- 
35001. and MAIH 2210. 

Ecosystem structure and (unction with emphasis on 
energetic and biogeochemical processes m natural and 
managed ecosystems, from local to global scales. 



ECOL 4020/6020-4020L/6020L. Field Systems 
Ecology. 4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500- 
3500L and MATH 2210 and MATH 2210L. 
Ecology, field biology, and dynamic processes of ter- 
restrial and aquatic ecosystems integrated by empirical 
monitoring and systems modeling within a campus 
watershed. Field trips to the Smoky Mountains and 
Georgia coast will extend the principles to a regional 
geographic scale. 

ECOL 4030/6030-4030L/6030L. Mammalogy. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and evolution of 
mammals. 

ECOL 4040/6040-4040L/6040L. Herpetology. 4 hours 

2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Evolution, ecology, behavior, structure, and physiol- 
ogy of amphibians and reptiles. 

ECOL 4050/6050-4050L/6050L. Ichthyology. 4 hours. 

3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1108-1108L. 
Taxonomy, distribution, ecology, evolution, and con- 
servation of the marine and freshwater fishes. 

ECOL4060/6060-4060L/6060L. Ornithology. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Identification, classification, life histories, evolution, 
and behavior of birds, with an emphasis on Georgia 
species. 

ECOL 4070/6070-4070L/6070L. Invertebrate Zool- 
ogy. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Functional morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny, and 
general biology of invertebrates. 

ECOL 4110/6110. Insect Diversity. 4 hours 1 hour 
lecture and 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

The biodiversity of tropical and temperate insects, in- 
cluding theoretical issues, natural history, and methods 
for study. 

ECOLCEETH) 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. Ecological 

Concepts. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 

week 

A general ecology course for non-science majors, 
which is a core course for the environmental ethics 
certificate. Based on lectures, readings, and laborato- 
ries. The course is designed to examine ecological 
phenomena from global patterns to individual interac- 
tions. 

(ECOL)ANTH 4210/6210. Zooarchaeology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or BIOL 
II04-1I04L or BIOL 1 108-1 108L or permission of 
major. 



154/ The University qj Georgia 



Ecology 



Animal remains recovered from archaeological sites, 
studied in light of zoological and archaeological meth- 
ods and theories and interpreted in terms of human and 
animal behavior. 

ECOL 4240/6240-4240L/6240L. Physiological Ecol- 
ogy. 3 hoars. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Physiological responses of organisms to environmen- 
tal factors. 

(ECOL)ANTH 4290/6290. Environmental Archae- 
ology. 3 hours. 3 hours lecture and 1 hour lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Prehistoric and historic human subsistence patterns 
through the methods and techniques of zooarchaeol- 
ogy, paleobotany, and paleonutrition. Theories of envi- 
ronmental reconstruction. 

ECOL(FORS) 4310/6310-4310L/6310L. Limnol- 
ogy. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500- 
3500L or FORS 3300. 

Aquatic ecosystems (lakes and streams) and their 
biota. Linkages between terrestrial and aquatic ecosys- 
tems. 

ECOL 6080. Principles of Conservation Ecology 
and Sustainable Development 1. 4 hours. 3 hours lec- 
ture and 1 hour lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or permission 
of department. 

Ecological principles applied to conservation of habi- 
tats and biodiversity. Influence of human activity on 
population dynamics, genetics, and community struc- 
ture. 

ECOL(ANTH)(FORS) 6140. Principles of Conser- 
vation Ecology and Sustainable Development II. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ECOL 6080. 

Social science dimensions of conservation and sus- 
tainable development; social, economic, and political 
considerations in managing natural resources; policy- 
level aspects to project implementation. 

ECOL 6400. Evolution of the Biosphere. 4 hours 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L and CHEM 
2211 and MATH 2210. 

Fundamental concepts and emerging ideas pertaining 
to the origin and maintenance of life and biological di- 
versity and the role of biological diversity in biogeo- 
chemical cycles and ecosystem function. 
Non-traditional format: Students must attend two 
hours of lecture each week as well as a two-hour dis- 
cussion period. There are four regularly scheduled 
contact hours between the faculty member and stu- 
dents each week. 

ECOL 7000. Master's Research. 1-15 hours Repeat 
able for maximum 20 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 



Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ECOL 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 1 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ECOL 8000. Topics in Modern Ecology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research topics in modern ecology presented by fac- 
ulty of ecology, with emphasis on research grants and 
proposal writing. 

ECOL(ANTH) 8110. Tropical Ecological and Cul- 
tural Systems. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: ECOL(FORS)(ANTH) 6140. 
Characteristics of tropical ecosystems, tropical biolog- 
ical communities, and human cultures in the tropics; 
how they differ from those in the temperate zone, and 
the implications for conservation and development. 

ECOL(BTNY) 8120-8120L. Plant Reproductive 
Ecology. 4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Pollination ecology, breeding systems, patterns of 
gene flow via pollen and seed dispersal, flower 
arrangement and phenology, and implications of re- 
productive biology for demography. Group and indi- 
vidual laboratory projects. 

ECOL(BTNY)(ENTO) 8150. Wetland Ecology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Principles of ecology, elemental cycling, hydrology, 
policy and management of marine and freshwater wet- 
lands. 

ECOL(BTNY)(ENTO) 8150L. Wetland Ecology 
Laboratory. 1 hour. 3 hours lab per week 
Prerequisite: ECOL(ENTO)(BTNY) 8150 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Techniques for the study of marine and freshwater 
wetlands. Optional weekend field trips will explore 
distant wetland sites 

ECOL 8170. Natural History of the Hymenoptera. 

4 hours. 1 hour lecture and 6 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Natural history of the Hymenoptera, including evolu- 
tion, ecology, and systematica. Identification of taxa of 
Hymenoptera and methods used in then study. 

ECOL 8220. Stream Ecology. 2 hours Repeatable 
tor maximum 8 hours credit. 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 
Current topics and literature from the standpoints of 
Objectives, experimental design, data analyses, results. 

assessment of results, and significance to general 

stream ecology. 

ECOL 8230. Lake Ecology. 2 BOUTS. Repeatable tor 
maximum 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 



Graduate Si kooi Description of Course* 155 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Current topics and literature in the ecology of lakes, 
ponds, reservoirs, and wetlands. 

ECOL 8300. Behavioral Ecology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Ecological variation, natural selection, and other evo- 
lutionary processes; sexual selection and sexual con- 
flict, mating systems, sex allocation, the causes and 
consequences of sexual behavior, evolution of sex, 
parental care, cooperation, competition, and punish- 
ment. 

ECOL(BTNYXFORS) 8310. Population Ecology. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L and permis- 
sion of department. 

Advanced ecological theory to biological populations. 
Mathematical and evolutionary treatment of popula- 
tion growth and regulation, niche theory, foraging the- 
ory, predator-prey theory, habitat selection, and 
competition. 

ECOL 8400. Perspectives on Conservation Ecology 
and Sustainable Development. 1 hour. 
Ecological issues of conservation and development. 

(ECOL)BTNY(FORS) 8410. Community Ecology. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: ECOL 40 10/601 0-40 10L/6010L and 
STAT 4220. 

The applicability of advanced theory to multi-species 
communities. Patterns and processes that influence 
species composition, diversity, and function. Topics 
include deterministic vs. stochastic regulation, succes- 
sion, resource partitioning, patch dynamics, island bio- 
geography, and food webs. 

ECOL 8420. Watershed Conservation. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L and permission of de- 
partment. 

Environmental problems in freshwater systems over a 
variety of scales (local to global) from a conservation 
perspective. Systems examined include streams, 
rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater and coastal wa- 
ters, with a strong focus on effective incorporation of 
ecological knowledge into resource management ef- 
forts. 

ECOL 8440. Principles of Agroforestry/Agroecol- 

Ogy. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: I .( OL( BIOI.) 3500-3500L or ECOL 
40 1 0/60 1 0-40 101 760 1 01 . or permission of department. 
Agricultural intercropping, mixed forestry plantation 
practices, and sustainable resource use. 

ECOL 8500. Theoretical Ecology. 2 hours. Repeat 

able tor maximum 8 hours credit. 2 hours lab per 

week 

Theoretical literature in population, community, ami 

ecosystem ecology. 

ECOL 8580-8580L. Theory of Systems Ecology. 

4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Theory of complex systems applied to ecology and 



ecosystems. Team projects will be conducted in eco- 
logical modeling and systems analysis. 

ECOL 8600. Nuclear Tracers in Ecology. 3 hours. 

2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 

The use of stable and radioactive tracers in ecological 
research. Current use of nuclear tracers for carbon, ni- 
trogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil, water, and ter- 
restrial ecosystems. 

(ECOL)EHSC 8610. Aquatic Toxicology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 221 1L and 
[EHSC 4490/6490 or PHRM(VPHY) 6910 or PHRM 
(VPHY)(POUL)(EHSC) 8920]. 
Toxicological effects of aquatic pollution focusing on 
fate and transport of xenobiotics; xenobiotic accumu- 
lation, dynamics, and toxicity in aquatic organisms; 
the analysis and modeling of the effects of aquatic pol- 
lution on organisms; and the determination of related 
risks to aquatic ecosystems and human populations. 

ECOL(EHSC) 8630-8630L. Quantitative Ecologi- 
cal Toxicology. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours 
lab per week. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L and (STAT 
4220 or STAT 6220). 

Principles and quantitative methods for the analysis of 
ecotoxicological data. 

(ECOL)CRSS 8650. Nutrient Cycling Models. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: [CSCI 7010 and CRSS(MIBO) 4610/ 
661 0-46 10L/6610L] or permission of department. 
Structure, function, and performance of current nutri- 
ent cycling models used to simulate carbon, nitrogen, 
phosphorus, and sulfur transformations in the soil. 

ECOL(CRSS) 8660-8660L. Soil Biology and Ecol- 
ogy. 4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Not open to students with credit in ECOL(CRSS) 
6650-6650L. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or CRSS 
4590/6590-4590L/6590L or CRSS(MIBO) 4610/ 
661 0-46 10L/6610L. 

Organisms in the soil environment, with emphasis on 
macrobiota and their functional roles in food webs and 
ecosystem processes 

ECOL(AAEC) 8700. Environmental Policy and 
Management. 3 hours. 

Evolution, form, and substance of United States fed- 
eral policies and programs that address ecological 
problems, focusing on the nature of problems and al- 
ternatives tor effective resolution. 

ECOL 8710. Environmental Law Practicum. 

4 hours Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Ecology, law, and other graduate students work to- 
gether to address pressing environmental concerns 
identified by community stakeholders. Skills used in- 
clude problem identification, research and analysis, 
legislative drafting, and presentations. 



156/ The University oj Georgia 



English 



ECOL 8720. Environmental Law for Scientists. 

3 hours. 

Common and statutory law (federal, state, and local) 

principlesintended to prevent and remedy pollution. 

ECOL 8990. Problems in Ecology. 1-3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Analysis of contemporary themes in ecology. 

ECOL 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ECOL 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 20 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



English 



Anne Williams, Head 

Nelson Hilton, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2197 
(Park Hall) 

For further information regarding courses, fac- 
ulty, students, admissions, language, and other 
requirements for the MA, MAT, and PhD de- 
grees, as well as our annual report, handbook, 
and initiatives in humanities computing, rhetoric 
and composition, and more, please visit our web 
site. 

The English department also participates in 
MA and PhD programs in linguistics. Further in- 
formation for these programs appears separately 
under Linguistics. 

E-mail address for: Graduate Coordinator: 
gradco@english.uga.edu; web site: www.eng- 
lish.uga.edu/grad. 

ENGL(LING) 4000/6000. History of the English 
Language. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or CMLT 21 1 1 or CMLT 2210 or CMLT 
221 2 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 2310 or 
ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 
2400. 

The development of present English through the 
stages of Old English, Middle English, and early Mod- 
ern English. Study of elementary phonetics, phone- 
mics, sound change, and dialect variation. 

ENGL(LING) 4010/6010. American English. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 



(LING) 3030 or CMLT 21 1 1 or CMLT 2210 or CMLT 

2212 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 10 or 

ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 

2400. 

The history, present status, and future prospects of 

American English, including standards and internal 

variation. 

ENGL(LING) 4060/6060. Old English. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or CMLT 21 1 1 or CMLT 2210 or CMLT 
22 1 2 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 1 or 
ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 
2400. 

The language and literature of England before the Nor- 
man Conquest, with reading of selected texts. 

ENGL(LING) 4110/6110. English Grammar. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or CMLT 21 1 1 or CMLT 2210 or CMLT 
22 1 2 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 1 or 
ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 
2400. 

English grammar in the scholarly tradition of Curme 
and Jespersen. 

ENGL(LING) 4170/6170. Second Language Acqui- 
sition. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4110/61 10 
or permission of department. 

Linguistic theories of second language acquisition, 
with emphasis on the acquisition of English. Topics in- 
clude order of acquisition, sociocultural factors with 
linguistic bases, and neurolinguistic models. 

ENGL(LING) 4180/6180. ESL Error Analysis. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4110/6110 
or permission of department. 

Psycholinguistic theory applied to problems in second 
language learning, and the prediction of language be- 
havior through the use of contrastive analysis. 

ENGL 4210/6210. Old English Literature. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4060/6060 
and two of the following: CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 
or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or 
ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 

Prose and poetry of the Old English period, exclusive 
of Beowulf, with emphasis on poetry. Works will be 
read in Old English, with supplementary translations. 

ENGL 4220/6220. Beowulf. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: HNGL(LING) 4060/6060 

and two of the following: CMLT 2210 oj CMLT 2220 

or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or 

ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 

The poem in the original old English, with attention to 

important critical studies 

ENGL 4240/6240. Chaucer. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Iwo of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 oi 1 NG1 2310 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENG1 2340orENGl 2400. 



Graduate School Description of Q 157 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and minor 
poems. 

ENGL 4300/6300. Elizabethan Poetry. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 
Poetry of the earlier English Renaissance, such as 
works by Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, and Mar- 
lowe, and the sonnets of Shakespeare. 

ENGL 4320/6320. Shakespeare: Part I. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 
The early plays of Shakespeare. 

ENGL 4330/6330. Shakespeare: Part II. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 
The later plays of Shakespeare. 

ENGL 4340/6340. Renaissance Drama. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 
English drama from 1576 to 1642, exclusive of Shake- 
speare, emphasizing dramatists such as Marlowe, Jon- 
son, Webster, and Middleton. 

ENGL 4350/6350. Seventeenth-Century Poetry. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 
Major English poets of the period, such as Donne, Jon- 
son, Herbert, and Marvell. 

ENGL 4400/6400. Restoration and Eighteenth- 
Century English Drama. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. 
Outstanding dramatists of the period: Dryden, 
Wycherley, Addison, Goldsmith, Sheridan, and others. 

IN (.1.4420/6420. Early Eighteenth-Century Prose 
and Poetry. ^ hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
(Ml | 2210orCMLl 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 
2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 oi ENGL 2400. 
Poetry and prose of the earlier eighteenth century, em- 
phasizing Addison, Steele. Defoe. Swilt. and Pope. 

ENGL 4440/6440. The 4ffC of Johnson. 3 hours. 

■laduate prerequisite: Two of the following: 
( Ml I 2210 oi CMLT 2220 oi ENGL 2310or ENG1 
2320 or IV, I 233001 ENG1 2340oi ENGL 2400. 
English literature Of the late eighteenth century, em- 
phasizing Johnson, Boswell, and their group 

EM. 1. 1 w am «i, iv.) 6040. LaafMfe U* in the 

African Anurieiin Communis. J hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

History and strueture of the speech and language styles 

158 / Thr University <>/ Georgia 



used in the African American community; examina- 
tion of linguistic and cultural issues that confront the 
majority of African Americans; the role of the vernac- 
ular language of African Americans in society. 

ENGL(LING) 6070. Middle English. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4000/6000 or ENGL 
(LING) 4060/6060 or permission of department. 
The English language of the Middle English period, 
including the development of the language from the 
end of the Old English period through the transition to 
Modern English. 

ENGL 6190. Study of the English Language. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The nature, structure, and varieties of the English lan- 
guage in vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and se- 
mantics. 

ENGL 6250. Medieval Drama. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
English drama from its beginnings to the opening of 
the public theater in 1576. 

ENGL 6260. Middle English Literature. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
English literature of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fif- 
teenth centuries, exclusive of Chaucer and the drama. 

ENGL 6290. Topics in Medieval Literature. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Special topics in Medieval literature to 1500. 

ENGL 6310. Spenser. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A study of The Faerie Queene, The Shepheardes Cal- 
ender, and the Amoretti, with attention to Spenser's 
other works and his literary context. 

ENGL 6360. Renaissance Prose. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Prose of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such 
as works by More, Sidney, Bacon, Donne, Browne, 
and Bunyan. 

ENGL 6370. Milton. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The works and times of John Milton. 

ENGL 6430. The Eighteenth-Century English 
Novel. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The English novel from Defoe to 1800, including nov- 
els by Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, and Sterne, the 
Gothic novel, and the novel of purpose. 

ENGL 6450. William Blake. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

The works, times, and critical heritage of William 

Blake. 

ENGL 6500. Early Romantic Literature. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Wordsworth. Coleridge, and other writers. 



English 



ENGL 6510. Later Romantic Literature. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Byron, Shelley, Keats, and other writers. 

ENGL 6520. The Nineteenth-Century British 

Novel. 3-6 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

The development of the British novel in the nineteenth 

century. 

ENGL 6530. Victorian Literature I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected prose and poetry of the early nineteenth cen- 
tury. 

ENGL 6540. Victorian Literature II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected prose and poetry of the later nineteenth cen- 
tury. 

ENGL 6600. Issues in Feminist Theory and Criti- 
cism. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Study of topics and approaches in feminist criticism. 

ENGL 6640. Film as Literature. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The interpretation of films, with emphasis on the rela- 
tionships between motion pictures and British and 
American literature. 

ENGL 6650. Modern Drama. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The drama of Europe and America from the realism of 
Ibsen and Strindberg to the present. 

ENGL 6660. Twentieth-Century British Poetry. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

British poetry since the 1890's. 

ENGL 6670. The Twentieth-Century British Novel. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Fiction of such representative British novelists for the 

twentieth century as Bowen, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, 

Lawrence, Waugh, Woolf, and Greene. 

ENGL 6680. Modern Irish Literature. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Fiction, poetry and drama of the Irish Renaissance and 

after. 

ENGL 6700. Imperfect Unions: American Writing 

to 1820. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Literature of British North America and the new 

United States from William Bradford through the early 

work of Irving and Cooper. Writers may include Row- 

landson, Bradstreet, Mather, Byrd, Woolman. Jetfcr- 

son, Franklin, Equiano, Paine. Bartram. and Brown. 

ENGL 6710. American Writing 1820-1865. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The writing that represents the achievement of Ameri- 
can literature in the decades before the Civil War. 



Writers may include Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, 
Hawthorne, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and 
Dickinson. 

ENGL 6720. American Writing 1865-1918. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The major fiction and poetry of the period, with some 
attention to literary movements as well as the impact 
of the Civil War on American literature. Writers may 
include Whitman, Dickinson, James, Twain, Chesnutt, 
Crane, Norris, Wharton, and Chopin. 

ENGL 6730. American Fiction 1918-1960. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The development of ideas and forms in American fic- 
tion from the end of World War I to 1960. Writers may 
include Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, 
Wright, Steinbeck, Porter, and Baldwin. 

ENGL 6740. American Poetry 1918-1960. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Ideas and forms in American poetry from 1918 to 
1960. Among the writers to be considered may be 
Eliot, Pound, H.D., Stein, Stevens, Moore, Williams, 
and Frost. 

ENGL 6750. American Writing After 1960. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The ideas and artistic expression of contemporary 
American prose and poetry. Writers may include 
Heller, Morrison, O'Brien, Kincaid, Erdrich, Lowell, 
Plath, Sexton, Rich, Roethke, Forche, Harjo, Howe, 
Ashbery, Lorde, and Perlman. 

ENGL(AFAM) 6770. Topics in African American 

Literature. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Selected topics in African American literature, such as 

autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, Gwendolyn 

Brooks and Richard Wright, Black American literature 

and aesthetics. 

ENGL 6780. Southern Writing. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The literary legacy of the American South. Writers 
may include Byrd, Poe, Simms, Cable, Chesnutt, 
Glasgow, Toomer, Faulkner, Porter, Hurston, Welty, 
O' Conner, and Percy. 

ENGL 6790. Topics in American Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Themes, literary traditions, and genres in American 
writing. 

ENGL 6800. Topics in Forms and Craft. 3 hours 
Repeatable for maximum t> hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in and issues around the act o\ writing. Sample 
courses include The An ot Translation. The An of the 
Book, The Novel Form, and Publishing and Editing. 

ENGL 6810. History <>r literary Criticism. J hours 

Prerequisite: Permission ol 'department. 

Literary theor> from Plato to the early modern period. 



Graduate School Description of Count i 154 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



examining changing concepts of genre, style, and the 
social function of literature. 

ENGL 6820. Contemporary Literary Theory. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Major themes and movements in twentieth-century 

criticism. 

ENGL 6830. Topics in Criticism and Theory. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A current critical problem, school, or approach, such 
as structuralism, poststructuralism, feminism, psycho- 
analysis, Marxism, New Historicism, gay and lesbian 
studies, postmodernism, or cultural studies. 

ENGL 6840. Folklore Studies. 3 hours. Repeatable 

for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

One or more folk groups, folklore genres, or topics 

concerning folklore. 

ENGL 6850. Topics in Multicultural Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected topics focusing on one or more cultures and 
exploring a variety of literary forms with some atten- 
tion to historical context and theoretical aspects of 
multiculturalism. 

ENGL 6860. History of Rhetoric and Textuality. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The rhetorical tradition from antiquity to the present, 
emphasizing the development of writing and textual- 
ity. 

ENGL 6870. Rhetoric and Textual Practice. 3 hours 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The relationship between rhetorical theory and the 
practice of writing, both literary and non-literary. 

ENGL 6886. College Composition Theory and Ped- 
agogy. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Current theories of writing pedagogy and strategies tor 
teaching writing at the college level. Topics include 
the composing process, invention, revision, and as 
sessmenl of writing. 

ENGL 6890. Bibliography and Methods of Re- 
search. 1 flours. 

|Uisite: Permission of department. 
Bibliographical analysis and description and the study 
of research materials and methods. 

ENGL 6900. Pructicum in Electronic Textuality. 

I -3 hours 

Electronic text resources; management of department- 
issued individual Unix shell account (tiles, file trans 
fer, telnet; mail, newsgroups); use of various browsers 
on the World Wide Web. home access, elementary text 
manipulation (concording); basic text and image edit- 



ing; fundamentals of "markup" language (HTML, 
SGML). 

ENGL 6910. Apprenticeship in College English. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 
An apprenticeship in the teaching of freshman compo- 
sition and of sophomore literature. 

ENGL 7000. Master's Research. 3-6 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ENGL 7300. Master's Thesis. 3-6 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

ENGL 8100. Seminar in English Language Studies. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Special topics in English linguistics. 

ENGL 8200. Seminar in Medieval Topics. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Special topics in Medieval literature. 

ENGL 8300. Seminar in Literature of the English 

Renaissance. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 

9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Special topics in English literature from More through 

Milton. Topics will vary. 

ENGL 8400. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Liter- 
ature. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Swift, Pope, Johnson, Fielding, or Blake. 

ENGL 8500. Seminar in English Romantic Litera- 
ture. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A major writer or special topics of the period. 

ENGL 8550. Seminar in Victorian Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. 

ENGL 8600. Seminar in Modern Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable lor maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 

An author or problem in twentieth-century British or 
American literature. 

ENGL 8700. Seminar in American Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
\ research course on special problems in American lit- 
erature. 



160/'///r University of Georgia 



Environmental Ethics 



ENGL 8710. Major American Writers. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A detailed examination of the life and works of one or 
two American authors. 

ENGL(AFAM) 8720. Seminar in African American 

Literature. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

A detailed examination of selected forms and ideas in 

the African American tradition. 

ENGL 8750. Seminar in Southern Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Special problems in Southern literature. 

ENGL 8800. Seminar in Creative Writing. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced instruction in the craft of writing. 

ENGL(CMLT) 8850. Seminar in Criticism and 
Theory. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A problem in structuralism, poststructuralism, femi- 
nism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, New Historicism, gay 
and lesbian studies, postmodernism, postcolonialism, 
or cultural studies; or of a major literary theorist. 

ENGL 8888. Seminar in Literary Computing. 

3 hours. 

Tools, procedures, and theoretical concerns of com- 
puter-enabled research and pedagogy in literary study. 

ENGL 8900. Current Issues in Rhetorical Theory. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Study of contemporary rhetorical theory and its rela- 
tion to literary criticism and English composition. 

ENGL 8960. Directed Reading. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Independent graduate study, under faculty supervision, 
in special topics not available in scheduled courses. 
Topics must be approved by the Graduate Committee 
in English. 

ENGL 9000. Doctoral Research. 3-6 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

ENGL 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 3-6 hours Re 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the majoi 
professor. 



Environmental Ethics 



Peter Hartel, Graduate Coordinator, 542-0898 
(Plant Sciences Building) 

Please see the Index for information on the cer- 
tificate program in environmental ethics. The 
courses having an environmental ethics prefix 
are listed below. 

EETH 4020/6020. Readings in Environmental 
Ethics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours 
credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Discussion of selected books and articles pertaining to 
environmental ethics. 

EETH(AESC) 4190/6190. Agricultural Ethics. 

1 hour. 2 hours lab per week. 

Ethical issues in agriculture. Topics include animal 
rights/animal welfare, agriculture as a business/agri- 
culture as a way of life, sustainable agriculture, 
(bio)technology, migrant farm workers, foreign aid, 
world hunger, and related topics. 

(EETH)ECOL 4200/6200-4200L/6200L. Ecological 
Concepts. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 
week. 

A general ecology course for non-science majors, 
which is a core course for the environmental ethics 
certificate. Based on lectures, readings, and laborato- 
ries. The course is designed to examine ecological 
phenomena from global patterns to individual interac- 
tions. 

(EETH)PHIL 4220/6220. Environmental Ethics. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 2200 or permission 

of department. 

Major professional and nonprofessional writings in the 

field of environmental ethics. 



4250/6250. Technology and Values. 

Permission of depart- 



(EETH)PHIL 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: 
ment. 

Technology in its broadest human context, with em- 
phasis on the mutual influence between means and 
ends and the impact oi' technology on shaping the be- 
liefs and attitudes oi a civilization. Includes alternative 
assessments ol technology and illustrates with Specific 
crucial issues of our time. 

EETH(JURI) 5870/7870. Environmental Dispute 
Resolution. 2 hours 

Conflict management, anatomj ol negotiation, plan- 
ning and conduct ot negotiations, and resolving multi- 
part) environmental disputes 



Graduate School Description of G •■ i 161 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



EETH 6000. Environmental Ethics Seminar. 1 hour. 

2 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Seminars in environmental ethics. Topics range from 

animal rights/animal welfare to ecofeminism and deep 

ecology. 

EETH 8010. Graduate Research. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research project under the direction of a faculty mem- 
ber done independently of regularly scheduled classes. 



Genetics 



John F. McDonald, Head 

Katherine R. Spindler, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-8000 
(Life Sciences Building) 

The Department of Genetics offers graduate pro- 
grams leading to the MS and PhD degrees. The 
department is particularly strong in the areas of 
recombinant DNA technology, gene regulation, 
prokaryotic molecular genetics, plant molecular 
biology, mammalian genetics, evolutionary ge- 
netics, and population genetics. After a student 
is admitted, a faculty advisory committee is ap- 
pointed to recommend a program of study based 
on the individual student's academic back- 
ground and research interests. A master's degree 
is not required for entrance into the doctoral pro- 
gram, and students without a master's degree are 
encouraged to enter the doctoral program di- 
rectly. 

Faculty members associated with three inter- 
departmental programs in the Division of Bio- 
logical Sciences in the RTG for Prokaryotic 
Diversity, in Cell and Developmental Biology 
and the (enter lor Metalloen/.yme Studies have 
close ties with the Department of Genetics. 
Graduate course offerings in these interdepart- 
mental programs are available to students in the 
Department of Genetics and serve to comple- 
ment the graduate course offerings in genetics. 

Physical facilities available for research in- 
clude all modern equipment and facilities neces- 
sary for research in the various areas ol genetics. 
Special on-campus facilities include a DNA and 
protein sequence and synthesis facility, a molec- 
ular marker analysis facility, a complete electron 
and COnfocal microscopy laboratory, controlled 
environment equipment, equipment for radioiso- 
tope studies, a special fermentation facility, a 
monoclonal antibody production facility, and 



extensive computer facilities. Cooperative 
arrangements for joint research exist with such 
off-campus facilities as the Russell Agricultural 
Research Center, the Yerkes Primate Center, the 
Sapelo Island Marine Institute, the Savannah 
River Ecology Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge 
National Laboratory. 

Prospective students should address inquiries 
to the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Ge- 
netics. E-mail: spindler@arches.uga.edu. Our 
World Wide Web address is: http://www.genet- 
ics.uga.edu. Graduate students in the department 
are eligible for a number of University fellow- 
ships and research and teaching assistantships. 
Applicants for the doctoral program will also be 
considered for traineeships provided by a Public 
Health Service Institutional National Research 
Service Award. The deadline for application for 
most fellowships and assistantships is January 1, 
and students are normally only admitted at the 
beginning of the fall semester. 

GENE 4200/6200. Advanced Genetics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
Prokaryotic, fungal, and mammalian genetic systems 
which form the basis of our understanding of molecu- 
lar genetics. Techniques used in the analysis of the 
structure and function of viral and eukaryotic 
genomes. 

GENE(BIOL) 4600/6600. Evolutionary Biology. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite:, GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
An introduction to the processes of evolution. Topics 
include population genetics, speciation, systematics, 
coevolution, chemical origin of life, history of life, ge- 
ological record, and evolution of humans. 

GENE 7000. Master's Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

GENE 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able lor maximum 10 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

GENE X070. Research Seminar in Population, Evo- 
lutionary, and Molecular Genetics. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable lor maximum 12 hours credit. 
Seminar focused on current research in population, 
evolutionary, and molecular genetics. 

GENE S0K0. Current Literature In Population, 
Evolutionary, and Molecular Genetics. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable lor maximum 10 hours credit. 
Journal Club examining the current literature on se- 
lected topics in population, evolutionary, and molecu- 
lar genetics. 



162 /I he University of Georgia 



Genetics 



GENE 8090. Statistical Analysis of Genetic Data. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: (STAT 4220 or STAT 6220) and STAT 
4510/6510. 

Common statistical and genetic models approximate 
for analyzing genetic data, especially DNA sequence 
data. Emphasis on fitting models, estimating parame- 
ters, and making inferences based upon genetic data. 

GENE 8120. Modeling Techniques in Population 
Genetics. 4 hours. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 4600/6600 and MATH 
2210 and MATH 22 10L. 

Quantitative techniques used in modeling evolutionary 
processes such as natural selection, gene flow, muta- 
tion, and random genetic drift. 

GENE 8130. Evolutionary Genetics. 4 hours. Re 
peatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: (MATH 2210 and MATH 2210L) or per- 
mission of department. 

Genetic processes in evolution that integrates elemen- 
tary conceptual models with the literature on experi- 
mental and field studies. Major topics include basic 
population genetics, an introduction to quantitative ge- 
netics, and a consideration of speciation and 
macroevolution. 

GENE 8150. Fundamentals of Evolutionary Genet- 
ics. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in GENE 8120 or 
GENE 8130. 

Prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
An introduction to evolutionary genetics combining 
both mathematical theory and experimental and field 
research and covering the basics of population genet- 
ics, evolutionary ecology, quantitative genetics, and 
molecular evolution. 

GENE 8500. Research Methods in Population Biol- 
ogy. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Methods of data analysis and modeling techniques 
used in Genetics research. 

GENE 8600. Genetics Seminar. 1 hour. Repeatable 
for maximum 4 hours credit. 1 hour lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Seminars emphasizing advances in genetics, molecu- 
lar genetics, and molecular biology. 

GENE 8650. Responsible Science. 1 hour. 
Prerequisite: Permission of dep art ment 

Ethical issues in genetics, how scientists work, social 
mechanisms in science, scientific misconduct, con- 
flicts of interest, and other issues related to ensuring 
integrity of the research process 

GENE 8700. Seminar in Population Genetics. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Evaluation of current research literature in population 

genetics 



GENE 8830. Advanced Topics in Molecular Genet- 
ics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8020 or GENE 8930 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Genetic regulatory mechanisms, extrachromosomal 
genetics, molecular aspects of recombination mecha- 
nisms, ribosome synthesis and control, plasmic genet- 
ics, and cytogenetics. 

GENE 8840. Advanced Topics in Population Genet- 
ics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced aspects of ecological and population genet- 
ics. 

GENE 8900. Research Techniques in Genetics. 3 

hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 15 
hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Techniques employed in genetics research taught by 
student participation in the research projects of Genet- 
ics faculty. 

GENE(BCMB) 8910. DNA Modeling. 2 hours. 1 
hour lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
The building of space filling models to help students 
understand the structure/function relationships of 
RNA and DNA. Computer modeling approaches will 
also be taught. 

GENE 8920. Nucleic Acids. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 6 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8020 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Structure and function of nucleic acids. The isolation, 
structure, chemical analysis, hybridization, enzymol- 
ogy, and replication of DNA and RNA, nucleic acids 
enzymes, protein-nucleic acid interactions and recom- 
binant DNA technology. 

GENE 8930. Advanced Molecular Genetics. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: BCMB 8010 or GENE 8920. 
The molecular mechanisms of gene action in procary- 
otes and eucaryotes, including discussions of chromo- 
some structure and replication, mutagenesis and DNA 
repair, recombination mechanisms, transposition, tran- 
scriptions, and translation controls. 

GENE 8950. Molecular Evolution. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: GENF. 42(K)/62(K) or permission of de- 
partment. 
The tacts and theories ol molecular evolution. Topics 

include protein evolution, evolution of development, 

evolution of genome structure, and critical evaluation 
of contemporary evolutionary theories 

(GENEXBCMB)BTNY(PATH) 8960. Genetics of 
Niiist and Filamentous Fungi. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Classical genetics and molecular hiologv of budding 

yeast, fission yeast, ami model filamentous fungi In- 
cludes life cycle, cell cycle, cytoskeleton, mating 



Graduate School Description ot ( OUTS* I 163 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



types, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, mutant screens, 
and cloning strategies. 

GENE 8970. Metazoan Genetics. 2-3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GENE 8930 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Genetic analysis of multicellular animals. Topics in- 
clude classical and modern genome mapping strate- 
gies, regulation of development of complex organ 
systems, viral genetics, and immunogenetics. 

GENE 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

GENE 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 20 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Geography 



Vernon Meentemeyer, Head 
Chor-Pang Lo, Graduate Coordinator 

542-2330 
(GG Building) 

The Department of Geography offers graduate 
programs leading to the MA, MS, and PhD de- 
grees with specialization in physical and human 
geography and in geographic information sci- 
ence (GIS). The department's strengths are in 
biogeography, geomorphology, quaternary stud- 
ies, geoarchaeology, and climatology; urban, 
economic, transportation, and social and devel- 
opment geography; and cartography, pho- 
togrammctry, remote sensing, and GIS. The 
department has strong ties with the Institute of 
Ecology; the Center for Archaeological Sci- 
ences; the Marine Sciences, Asian Studies, 
Women's Studies and African Studies programs; 
the Humanities ('enter; the Institute of Govern- 
ment: the TefT) College of Business; and the In- 
stitute for Behavioral Research. As a member of 
the Inter-University Consortium for Political 
and Social Research, the University supports a 
host of resources and BCrvice8 for social science 
research. Housed in the Department of "Geogra- 
phy is the Center lor Remote Sensing and Map- 
ping Science (CRMS). ('RMS undertakes 
interdisciplinary research projects requiring the 
development of image and map data and pro 
cessmg technologies for applications m the 



physical, biological, and mapping sciences. The 
faculty hail from six different countries and so 
have diverse backgrounds and interests which 
enrich the graduate programs. There are more 
than sixty graduate students from the USA and 
overseas in residence. The MA and MS degrees 
require 7 core hours and a minimum of 1 8 elec- 
tive hours, in addition to 6 hours of thesis writ- 
ing. Programs of study tailored for either the 
MA or MS degree are designed in consultation 
with the student's advisory committee. Nor- 
mally, students with primary interests in physi- 
cal geography or geographical techniques 
pursue the MS degree, whereas students with 
primary interests in human geography pursue 
the MA degree. For the PhD, the department re- 
quires a minimum of 30 credit hours (including 
4 core hours if not already taken in the MA or 
MS degree) and a reading knowledge of one for- 
eign language or two additional techniques 
courses. 

Geography has excellent teaching and re- 
search facilities in a building shared with the 
Department of Geology. The two departments 
jointly operate a Geosciences Learning Center 
with 25 computers used for graduate computer- 
aided instruction. The Geomorphology Labora- 
tory, primarily designed for standard 
wet-chemical and mechanical analyses of soil, 
sediment, and plant materials, includes a sepa- 
rate work area with PCS, balances, and micro- 
scopes. The Plant Microfossil Laboratory is 
designed principally for the extraction of pollen 
grains from sediments and includes a separate 
microscope facility. The TL/OSL Dating Labo- 
ratory has a RIS TL/OSL - DA - 15 glow 
oven/sample changer which is equipped with a 
blue light OSL attachment. Other equipment in- 
cludes a low-level beta counter, three alpha 
counters and alpha and beta irradiators. It is a 
state-of-the-art facility that can be used to date 
sediments and archaeological materials. The 
Tree-ring Laboratory has a fully automated 
stage and computercontrolled microscope imag- 
ing system for measuring and analyzing tree 
cores. The Climatology Research Laboratory in- 
cludes four workstations, one receiving a feed of 
real time weather data, and software packages 
for climatological analysis. A variety of micro- 
climatological instrumentation is also available 
for student use. In addition to a word processing 
facility, the department maintains separate labo- 
ratories for introductory GIS and cartography; 
advanced GIS, remote sensing and photogram- 
metry; and spatial analysis and economic geog- 
raphy. Each laboratory is equipped with 



164 / The University of d <>ri>ia 



Geography 



state-of-the-art computers, both PCS and work- 
stations, on a local area network with digitizers, 
scanners, printers, and plotters with current soft- 
ware in all areas. CRMS also maintains a com- 
plex computer network and extensive software 
for remote sensing, GIS and photogrammetric 
applications. All students have internet access 
and electronic mail. 

The University's library holdings, particularly 
in geography, are extensive. Approximately 
290,000 sheet maps and over 180,000 aerial 
photos are maintained in the nearby Science Li- 
brary. The Computer Center operates one of the 
largest facilities in the U.S. There are numerous 
remote sites on campus with interactive termi- 
nals, remote printers, and various mini and mi- 
crocomputer facilities. 

For further information, our e-mail address is 
gradcoordinator@ggy.uga.edu. 

GEOG 4920/6920. Special Problems in Area Analy- 
sis. 1 -3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Independent research and readings on geographical 
topics by arrangement with specific faculty. 

GEOG 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Research 
while enrolled for a master's degree under the direc- 
tion of faculty members. 

GEOG 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 45 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Thesis writing 
under the direction of the major professor. 

GEOG 9000. Doctoral Research. 1 -9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Research 
while enrolled for a doctoral degree under the direc- 
tion of faculty members. 

GEOG 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Dissertation 
writing under the direction of the major professor 

Human and Regional 
Geography 

GEOG 4610/6610. Location Analysis. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3620 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The geography of retail activity and consumer de- 
mand. Principles o\' locational decision-making tor re 
tail and service firms. 



GEOG 4620/6620. Advanced Economic Geogra- 
phy. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3620 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Advanced theoretical and empirical issues in eco- 
nomic geography, such as impacts of globalization, re- 
gional development, trade patterns, and labor issues. 
Topics will vary. 

GEOG 4630/6630. Advanced Urban Geography. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3630 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Urban growth and approaches to urban analysis. Ur- 
banization processes within urban systems, including 
economic, demographic, social, and technological 
change. 

GEOG 4640/6640. Population Geography. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1101-1 101 D or 
permission of department. 

The distribution of world population and an introduc- 
tion to population data and to basic demographic tech- 
niques. Topics include theories of population change, 
fertility, mortality, migration, population policy, and 
population-environment relationships. 

GEOG 4650/6650. Industrial Geography. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3620 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The regional basis of economic growth and industry 
case studies. The impact of product and process inno- 
vation, entrepreneurship, globalization, and the service 
economy on the spatial distribution of industry. 

GEOG 4660/6660. Urban and Regional Develop- 
ment. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1 101-1 101D or 
permission of department. 

Regional development and the implications of global- 
ization to regional economies of the industrialized 
countries. Discussions on the changing dynamics o\~ 
international competition and the reorganization of 
production. Contemporary trends in regional eco- 
nomic development policy, including high technology 
and service-sector development. 

GEOG 4670/6670. Geography of Development. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1101-1 10ID or 
permission of department. 

Geographical aspects ot Third World development, in- 
cluding population growth, migration, industrializa- 
tion, trade, and foreign aid. The spatial characteristics 
of economic development are viewed at the concep- 
tual level and implications tor pollC) discussed. 

GEOG 4680766X0. Gender and Geography. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG I101-U01D or 

WMST 1110-11 10D or permission of department 
Relationships between gender and globalization. 
Women and development, industrialization, and third 
world regions 



tcription <>t ( ■■ < 165 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



GEOG 4710/6710. Geography of Sub-Saharan 
Africa. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1 101-1 101D or 
permission of department. 

Geographic and socio-economic issues that face sub- 
Saharan economies into the twenty-first century. 
Emphasis on the physical landscape, environmental 
conditions, social and cultural distributions, and strate- 
gies and theories of economic development. 

GEOG 4720/6720. Geography of Latin America. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1 101-1 101D or 
permission of department. 

The geography of Latin America, including physical, 
cultural, and economic characteristics of different re- 
gions. Prospects for expansion of settlement, develop- 
ment of resources, and growth of industries. 

GEOG 4730/6730. Geography of China. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1 101-1 101D or 
permission of department. 

The physical and human geography of contemporary 
China. Emphasis is on modernization and develop- 
ment of agriculture, industry, and transportation within 
the context of China's resource base and large popula- 
tion. 

GEOG 4740/6740. Geography of East and South- 
east Asia. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1 101-1 101D or 
permission of department. 

The physical and human geography of East and South- 
east Asia. Major focus on resources, land utilization, 
population characteristics and distributions as they re- 
late to economic and political problems. Emphasis is 
on Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Philippines, and Indo- 
China. 

GEOG 8620. Seminar in Economic Geography. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: GEOG 4620/6620 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Empirical and theoretical issues in contemporary eco- 
nomic geography. Specific topics vary. 

GEOG 8630. Seminar in Urban Geography. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: GEOG 4630/6630 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Topics and research problems in urban geography. 
Topics may vary. 

GEOG 8640. Seminar in Advanced Demographic 
Analysis. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4640/6640 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Problems, methods, and techniques in demographic 
analysis; construction and interpretation of life tables; 
population estimation and projection; cohort analysis, 
migration, and household demography. Emphasis is on 
application of these techniques to geographical analy- 
sis of population dynamics. 



GEOG 8660. Seminar in Regional Development. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: GEOG 4660/6660 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Topics on regional development and effects of global- 
ization on regional economies of industrialized coun- 
tries. Specific topics may vary. 

GEOG 8670. Seminar in the Geography of Devel- 
opment. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4670/6670 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Research topics related to the geographical aspects of 
Third World development. Topics may vary. 

GEOG 8690. Directed Problems in Human Geog- 
raphy. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems in advanced topics in human geography. 
Topics may vary. 

GEOG 8710. Seminar in Regional Geography. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research topics on the geography of a selected region; 
data sources and methodologies for research. 
Regions may vary. 

GEOG 8810. Seminar in Human-Environment Re- 
lationships. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems, methods, and techniques in human-environ- 
ment relationships and economic development, in- 
cluding decision-making strategies in resource 
exploitation. 

GEOG 8900. Proseminar in Geography. 1 hour. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Introduction to the graduate program and the depart- 
mental faculty, including major foci of research activ- 
ities and directions within the department. 

GEOG 8910. Seminar in Geographic Thought and 
Methods. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Development of geographical philosophy and meth- 
ods; contemporary methodological concepts and prob- 
lems. Required for all graduate majors. 

GEOG 8920. Seminar in Social Theory in Geogra- 
phy. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Contemporary debates concerning space and society. 
Epistemological and ontological debates within geog- 
raphy relating to the spatial constitution of society and 
the social production of geographical knowledge. 



166 / The University of Georgia 



Geography 



Physical Geography 

GEOG 4020/6020. Fluvial Geomorphology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3010 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Landforming effects of surface-water movement with 
emphasis on surface-water hydrology, streamflow me- 
chanics, floods, sediment transport and storage, and 
landform evolution. Field trips included. 

GEOG 4030/6030. Geomorphology and Environ- 
mental Change in Karst and Arid Environments. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3010 or (GEOG 
1 1 1 3 and GEOG 1 1 1 3L) or GEOL 1 250- 1 250L or per- 
mission of department. 

Weathering, erosional and depositional processes, and 
landforms in karst and arid areas. Formation of sink- 
holes, sinking streams, caves, springs, sand dunes, 
playas, and yardangs. Geoarchaeological and other ev- 
idence on the nature of past environments, including 
dating cave and aeolian sediments. Field trips in- 
cluded. 

GEOG 4040/6040. Global Environmental Change 
During the Quaternary. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3010 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Chronology and geomorphic, isotopic, and palynolog- 
ical evidence of Quaternary paleoclimates. The effects 
of past climatic changes upon present landscapes, his- 
toric short-term fluctuations in temperature and pre- 
cipitation, and possible explanations for climatic 
change are emphasized. 

GEOG 4120/6120. Synoptic Meteorology/Climatol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3110 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Theory and observations to understand mid-latitude 
weather systems. Focus is on application of quasi- 
geostrophic theory in weather forecasting. Analysis 
and interpretation of weather maps and numerical 
models will be used to examine atmospheric dynamics 
and thermodynamics. 

GEOG 4140/6140. Satellite Climatology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (GEOG 1111 and GEOG 
1 1 1 1 L) or (GEOG 1 1 1 2 and GEOG 1 1 1 2L) or (GEOG 
2110H and GEOG 2110L) or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Satellite remote sensing in climatology, including cli- 
matologies of clouds, atmospheric water vapor and 
precipitation, the Earth's radiation budget, sea and 
land surface temperatures, and the cryosphere and 
vegetation. 

GEOG 4160/6160. Applied Climatology. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3110 or permis- 
sion of department. 

The interaction of climate with organisms, communi- 
ties, and ecosystems. Mechanisms of heat flow, radia- 
tion exchanges and water vapor flux; statistical 
methods used with climatic data; blockmark methods 



used to improve environmental impact assessment; 
and case studies that demonstrate the role of climate in 
ecosystem function. 

GEOG(BTNY) 4220/6220. Ecological Biogeogra- 
phy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 3210 or ECOL 
(BIOL) 3500-3500L or permission of department. 
Patterns of plant distribution in contemporary land- 
scapes and underlying processes, including vegetation 
dynamics, disturbance ecology, biogeomorphology, 
dendrochronology, and environmental history. 

GEOG(BTNY) 4240/6240. Plant Geography. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1 104-1 104L and 
GEOG 1 1 12 and [GEOG 3210 or ECOL(BIOL) 3500- 
3500L] or permission of department. 
Phytogeographical zonation, plant-geographic 
processes, and current potential natural vegetation. In- 
cludes physical and environmental factors, plant-envi- 
ronment relationships, plant roles and types, 
vegetation dynamics, geographic responses to distur- 
bance, and vegetation of main world biomes. Empha- 
sis on global-scale patterns and relationships. 

GEOG 4810/6810. Conservation Ecology and Re- 
source Management. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 1125-1125D or 
GEOG 2250H-2250D or permission of department. 
Ecological and economic analysis of human use of 
global and regional resources, emphasizing ecological 
requirements, sustainable use, and holistic decision- 
making. Topics include ecosystem dynamics, func- 
tional biodiversity, landscape management, 
socioeconomic traps, global change, and ecological 
restoration. 

GEOG 8020. Seminar in Geomorphology. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: GEOG 4020/6020 or GEOG 4030/6030 
or permission of department. 

Advanced problems in geomorphology and physiogra- 
phy. Topics may vary. 

GEOG 8040. Seminar in Quaternary Paleoenviron- 
ments. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4040/6040 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Methods used in reconstructing the hvdrological and 
vegetation characteristics of Former environments 
Emphasis is on the analysis of cave, fluvial, and ma- 
rine sediments. The changing Quaternary environ- 
ments of North America, Europe, and Africa are 
discussed in detail. Specific topics ma\ vary. 

GEOG 8120. Seminar in Climatolog). 3 hours Re 
peatahle for maximum V hours credit. 
Prerequisite GEOG 4120/6120 or GEOG 4 140/6140 
or GEOG 4160/6160 or permission of department 
Advanced topics in physical clhnatolog) such as cli- 
mate change, microclimatology. urban climatologs or 
synoptic climatology. Specific topics ma\ \ary 



Graduate School Description oj c 'ourst i 167 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



GEOG 8220. Seminar in Biogeography. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: GEOG(BTNY) 4220/6220 or GEOG 
(BTNY) 4240/6240 or permission of department. 
Advanced topics and research trends in biogeography. 
Specific topics may vary. 

GEOG 8240. Seminar in Geoecology. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Geographical ecology, with specific topics ranging 
from landscape to global scale (e.g., landscape ecol- 
ogy, regional ecology, conservation problems, bios- 
phere-atmosphere interactions, global ecology and 
global change). 

GEOG 8290. Directed Problems in Physical Geog- 
raphy. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced problems in physical geography. Topics 
vary. 

Geographic Techniques and 
Methods 

GEOG 4300/6300. Introductory Spatial Analysis. 3 

hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 2300 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Descriptive and inferential techniques used in quanti- 
tative geographic analysis. Probability distributions, 
sampling techniques, parametric and nonparametric 
inference, analysis of variance, spatial autocorrelation 
measures and regression procedures. Applications of 
statistical methods to spatial analysis and geographic 
research design. Exercises develop knowledge of sta- 
tistical programming with computer software. 

GEOG 43 10/631 0-43 10L/6310L. Cartographic De- 
sign and Reproduction. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 
2 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 351 0-35 10L or 
permission of department. 

Design, examination of cartographic literature, map 
production methods, and their effects on design. Prac- 
tical applications of desktop publishing, page layout 
with specific emphasis on state atlas design, map-nar- 
rative interactions, four color map reproduction, and 
photo-cartographic techniques. 

GEOG 4330/6330-4330L/6330L. The Use and In- 
terpretation of Aerial Photographs. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Principles and techniques of extracting descriptive and 
metric information about the environment from aerial 
photographs acquired in analog and digital forms. Ap- 
plications emphasize planimetric mapping and inter- 
pretation of physical and cultural landscapes. A term 
project using the techniques is required. 



GEOG 4350/6350-4350L/6350L. Remote Sensing of 
Environment. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 4330/6330- 
4330L/6330L or permission of department. 
Remote sensing with emphasis on aerospace applica- 
tions in the natural sciences. Fundamental properties 
of the electromagnetic spectrum and remote sensing 
devices such as multispectral cameras, thermal in- 
frared line scanners, and television and radar imaging 
systems. 

GEOG 4370/6370-4370L/6370L. Introduction to 
Geographic Information Systems. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CSCI 1301-1301L or 
sophomore standing or permission of department. 
Principles and applications of geographic information 
systems (GIS). Examines the nature and accuracy of 
spatially referenced data, as well as methods of data 
capture, storage, retrieval, visualization, modeling, 
and output using one or more GIS software packaged. 

GEOG 4410/6410-4410L/6410L. Cartographic Vi- 
sualization Methods. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 
hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 351 0-35 10L or 
permission of department. 

Theory and application of computer technology in the 
preparation of thematic maps and graphics. 
Emphasis on the creation, analysis, and display of sta- 
tistical surfaces. Students explore trends in carto- 
graphic visualization methods, including interactive 
and animated mapping techniques. 

GEOG 4430/6430-4430L/6430L. Advanced Pho- 
togrammetry. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOG 4330/6330- 
4330L/6330L or permission of department. 
Theories of analytical and digital (soft copy) pho- 
togrammetry as applied to topographic mapping. Top- 
ics include refinement of photographic measurements, 
coordinate transformations, stereoscopic parallax, 
collinearity equations, aerial triangulation, orthopho- 
tography, and digital image correlation. 

GEOG 4470/6470-4470I76470L. Geographic Analy- 
sis and Geographic Information Systems. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (GEOG 4300/6300 and 
GEOG 4370/6370-4370L/6370L and CSCI 1302) or 
permission of department. 

Geographic analytical methods and implementation. 
Theory and concepts of spatial analysis. Description, 
reduction, and comparison of point, line, area, and vol- 
umetric geographic data sets. Implementation and lim- 
itation of geographic information systems. 

GEOG 8300. Multivariate Techniques in Geogra- 
phy. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4300/6300 or permission of de- 
partment. 
Application of multivariate statistical procedures to re- 



168 / The University of Georgia 



Geology 



search problems in geography, with emphasis on pe- 
culiarities of such applications. Spatial autocorrela- 
tion, areal aggregation, modifiable areal unit problem, 
spatial interpolation, and trend surfaces are investi- 
gated with statistical and GIS software packages. 

GEOG 8350. Remote Sensing with GIS Applica- 
tions. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: (GEOG 4350/6350-4350L/6350L and 
GEOG 4370/6370-4370L/6370L ) or permission of 
department. 

Mapping datums, coordinate systems, and accuracy 
requirements for geographic information systems 
(GIS). Global positioning system (GPS), softcopy 
photogrammetry, and digital image processing tech- 
niques for GIS database construction. GIS modeling 
for environmental studies. Includes the use of various 
software packages. 

GEOG 8390. Directed Problems in Quantitative 
Geographic Methods. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for max- 
imum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in statistical analysis of geographic data and 
geographic modeling. 

GEOG 8450. Problems in Remote Sensing of Envi- 
ronment I. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4350/6350-4350L/6350L or per- 
mission of department. 

Advanced problems in photointerpretation, pho- 
togrammetry and remote sensing. Topics may vary. 
Emphasis on research and applications. 

GEOG 8510. Seminar in Cartography. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GEOG 43 10/631 0-43 10L/6310L or 
GEOG 44 10/641 0-44 10L/6410L or permission of de- 
partment. 

Special problems in the application of cartography. 
Emphasis on problems involving map design and pro- 
duction, computer graphics, map perception, carto- 
graphic visualization, and map animation. 

GEOG 8530. Advanced Topics in the Use and In- 
terpretation of Aerial Photographs. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GEOG 4330/6330-4330L/6330L or per- 
mission of department. 

The extraction of quantitative and qualitative informa- 
tion from aerial photographs, with emphasis on 
appropriateness of various approaches and on means 
of improving interpretation accuracy. Includes appli- 
cations involving physical, human, and regional geog- 
raphy. 

GEOG 8550. Problems in Remote Sensing of Envi- 
ronment II. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4350/6350-4350L/6350L or per- 
mission of department. 

Advanced problems in photointerpretation, pho- 
togrammetry, and remote sensing. Topics may vary. 
Emphasis on research and applications 



GEOG 8570. Seminar in Geographic Information 
Systems. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4370/6370-4370L/6370L and 
permission of department. 

Problems in geographic information systems, includ- 
ing methods and techniques and the application to spe- 
cific topical areas. 

GEOG 8590. Directed Problems in Geographic 
Techniques. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 
hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in mapping sciences, such as cartography, air- 
photo interpretation, remote sensing, photogrammetry, 
and geographic information systems. 



Geology 



Samuel E. Swanson, Head 

David B. Wenner, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2652 
(GG Building) 

The department offers instruction and opportu- 
nities for research in archaeological geology, 
economic geology, geochemistry, clay mineral- 
ogy, geophysics, hydrogeology, marine geology, 
mineralogy, paleontology, micropaleontology, 
petrology, stratigraphy-sedimentology, and 
other fields. Graduate programs leading to the 
MS and PhD are individually arranged to fit 
each student and his/her background. 

Facilities for graduate training and research 
include analytical and experimental laboratories 
containing X-ray diffraction equipment, mass 
spectrometers, FTIR and an electron micro- 
probe. Special facilities include a stable isotope 
laboratory, a potassium-argon laboratory, an ex- 
perimental petrology laboratory, equipment for 
seismological studies, a cathodeluminoscope, a 
carbon- 14 and tritium dating laboratory, a neu- 
tron activation analysis laboratory, paleontolog- 
ical and sedimentological laboratories, and 
laboratories for sample preparation, optical de- 
termination, 12 station computer lab and photo- 
microscopy. The university's Marine Institute on 
Sapelo Island and the Skidaua\ Institute of 

Oceanograph) at Savannah provide facilities tor 

research in marine geology. Companion facili- 
ties include the university computer center, elec- 
tron microscop) laboratory, field vehicles, 

instrument shops, and rock, mineral, and fossil 
collections. 



Graduate School Description <>t Coursei 169 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



GEOL 4050/6050. Facies Models and Stratigraphy. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 401 0-40 10L. 
Sedimentary processes in major siliciclastic and car- 
bonate depositional environments. Factors affecting 
deposition and erosion of sediments on time scales of 
hundreds of years to hundreds of thousands of years. 

GEOL 4060/6060. Structural Geology. 3 hours. 

2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 301 0-30 10L. 
Stress and strain within the earth, and the mechanical 
properties and behavior of earth materials. 
Geologic structures, their recognition and interpreta- 
tion in the field, and solution of structural problems. 
Framework of the earth's crust; evolution of mountain 
belts, continents, and basins. Relation between struc- 
tures, deformation, and plate tectonics. 

GEOL 4090/6090. Marine Geology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: [(GEOL 1121 and GEOL 
1121L) and (GEOL 1122 and GEOL 1122L)] or 
GEOL 1260-1260L. 

The geologic aspects of ocean basins, including mor- 
phology, sedimentation processes, and mode of origin. 

GEOL 4110/6110. Principles of Geochemistry. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
121 2L and GEOL 301 0-30 10L) or permission of de- 
partment. 

Distribution of elements and isotopes in minerals, 
rocks, and waters. Principles governing the migration 
and behavior of elements and isotopes. 

GEOL 4220/6220. Hydrogeology. 3 hours. 
Groundwater in the hydrologic cycle. Examination of 
flow through porous media, regional flow, influence of 
wells, water chemistry, and contaminant transport. 
Emphasis on practical environmental problems. 

GEOL 4250/6250. Field Methods in Geology. 

2 hours. 1 hour lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 301 0-30 10L. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: GEOL 
3020-3020L. 

Field measurement of geologic parameters, accurate 
recording of observations, production and interpreta- 
tion of geologic maps and cross sections, and the 
recognition of structures and lithologies in the field. 

GEOL 4270/6270. Geology Field School. 6 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 3020-3020L or 
GEOL 40I0-4010L or GEOL 4020-4020L or GEOL 

4250/6250. 

Theory and practice of field measurement, large scale 
planimetric and topographic mapping, and grid sur- 
veying. Graphic presentation of field data. Geologic 
mapping projects, including interpretation of observed 
geologic features. Summary maps and reports must be 
prepared and defended in the field. Student must 
demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills 
taught in the required on-campus major courses. 



GEOL 4300/6300. Igneous and Metamorphic 
Petrology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 4020-4020L. 
Textures, mineralogy, and classification of the com- 
mon igneous and metamorphic rocks. Origin of mag- 
mas and volcanoes and their impact on civilizations; 
evolutions of continental and oceanic crusts; meta- 
morphic rocks as probes of crustal processes. 

GEOL 4310/6310. Economic Geology. 3 hours. 

2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 4020-4020L. 
Classification and origin of base and precious metal 
ore deposits; relationships between ore deposits, host 
rocks, and plate tectonics; principles of ore deposit ex- 
ploration and evaluation. 

GEOL 4330/6330. Geology of North America. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 1260-1260L. 
Evolution of North American continent through time. 
Stratigraphic, sedimentary, and magmatic history and 
tectonic development of various regions since the 
early Precambrian. Paleontological record of environ- 
mental and biological changes. Origin of energy, min- 
eral, soil, and water resources. History of human 
habitation and resource utilization. Current environ- 
mental hazards and challenges. 

GEOL(ANTH) 4340/6340. Archaeometry. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL(ANTH) 4700/ 
6700. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: GEOL 
1 121 or GEOL 1 121H or GEOL 1 122 or GEOL 2350H 
or ANTH 3220 or ANTH 3250 or ANTH(ECOL) 
4210/6210 or CLAS(ANTH) 2000. 
Methods of archaeometric analysis including chrono- 
metric and instrumental techniques. Absolute age dat- 
ing and characterization of archaeological materials by 
physico-chemical analysis. 

GEOL 4350/6350. Geology of the Planets and 
Moons. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 3020-3020L and 
GEOL 4020-4020L. 

Geology of the planets, moons, and asteroids, includ- 
ing internal, surficial, and atmospheric processes. 
Studies in comparative planetology aimed at showing 
how unique the current life-supporting environment of 
the Earth is, and why other planets have undergone 
such dramatically different evolutions. 

GEOL 4370/6370. Data Analysis in the Geo- 
sciences. 3 hours. 

The principles of data analysis, including data collec- 
tion methods, graphical presentation, and basic statis- 
tics. 

GEOL 4410/6410. Introduction to Research in 
Archeogeology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to archeogeology. 



170 /The University <>\ Georgia 



Geology 



GEOL 4420/6420. Introduction to Research in Geo- 
chemistry. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 
hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to geochemistry. 

GEOL 4430/6430. Introduction to Research in Geo- 
physics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to geophysics. 

GEOL 4440/6440. Introduction to Research in Hy- 
drogeology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to hydrogeology. 

GEOL 4450/6450. Introduction to Research in 
Mineralogy. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to mineralogy. 

GEOL 4460/6460. Introduction to Research in Pa- 
leontology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to paleontology. 

GEOL 4470/6470. Introduction to Research in 
Petrology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to petrology. 

GEOL 4480/6480. Introduction to Research in Sed- 
imentary Geology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques appropriate to sedimentation and stratigra- 
phy. 

GEOL 4490/6490. Introduction to Research in 
Structure/Tectonics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 9 hours credit. 

The literature, research procedures, and instrumental 
techniques applicable to structural geology and/or tec- 
tonics. 

GEOL 4500/6500. Sedimentary Petrology. 3 hours 

2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 30 10-30 1 OL. 
Mineralogical, petrologies!, and geochemical study oi 
sedimentary rocks (shales, sandstones, limestones, 
dolostones. cherts, cvaporites, phosphorites, etc.) to 
interpret origins ol sedimentary grains and to under- 
stand porosity and permeability of water/rock interac- 
tion in and diagenesis ol scdimentar\ rocks. 

GEOL 4510/6510. Marine Micropaleontologv. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 401 0-40 10L, 
Geologic history and applications of marine microfos- 
sils. especial!) loiaininilera. calcareous nannoplank- 
ton, radiolaria, and diatoms. 



GEOL 4520/6520. Paleoecology. 3 hours. 1 hour lec- 
ture and 4 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [GEOL 1260-1260L or 
(GEOL 1 1 22 and GEOL 1 1 22L) or (GEOL 1 1 22H and 
GEOL 1 122L) and GEOL 401 0-40 10L] or permission 
of department. 

The ecological factors affecting the distribution and 
abundance of fossil organisms, with emphasis on ma- 
rine invertebrates. Invertebrates as a guide to environ- 
ments of the past and as indicators of environmental 
change. Taphonomy of invertebrates. 

GEOL 4550/6550. Clay Mineralogy and Geochem- 
istry. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 301 0-30 10L. 
Clay minerals with emphasis on x-ray diffraction 
analysis and identification of mixed layer systems. 
Geochemical factors for clay origin and uses including 
applications to soils, petroleum, archeological, envi- 
ronmental and economic ore deposit studies. 

GEOL 4560/6560. Weathering and Diagenesis. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 1211 and CHEM 
1 2 1 1 L and GEOL 3020-3020L. 
Global cycling of major elements. Rock-water interac- 
tions. Kinetics of mineral dissolution and growth in 
soil, marine, freshwater, sedimentary basins and hy- 
drothermal systems. Geochemical models for estimat- 
ing reaction rates and reservoir capacities/fluxes are 
considered. 

GEOL 4600/6600. Solid Earth Geophysics. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 4020-4020L and 
MATH 2200 and MATH 2200L. 
Analysis of Earth's gravity, magnetic, and seismic 
wave fields applied to the investigation of structure 
and dynamics of the Earth's interior. Course will cover 
theory, methods of analysis, and results of geophysical 
investigations. Emphasis on major new initiatives in 
satellite geodesy and digital seismic array studies. 

GEOL 4620/6620. Exploration Geophysics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 4020-4020L and 
MATH 2200 and MATH 2200L. 
Geophysical methods for imaging the subsurface. 
Course will locus on gravity, magnetic, resistivity, 
seismic refraction, and seismic reflection surveys. Ap- 
plications discussed include exploration for hydrocar- 
bons and characterization of the shallow subsurface 
for engmeenng/groundwater studies. Laboratory will 
include field experiments and computer modeling 
studies. 

GEOL 4640/6640. Geochemical and Gcoph\sical 

Surveys. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GEOL 3010-30101 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: GEO! 

4020 W20L. 

Geochemical dispersion and survey of common 

pathfinder elements; methods of instrumental analysis 

used in geochemical exploration. Background theorj 

ol gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electrical 



Graduate S* h<><>l Description <>t ( ourst i 171 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



techniques used in resource exploration. Field based 
projects. 

GEOL 4660/6660. Field School in Shallow Geo- 
physics. 6 hours. 6 hours lecture and 48-56 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (GEOL 1121 and GEOL 
1121L) or GEOL 1250-1250L or permission of de- 
partment. 

Techniques for the geophysical propsection of near- 
surface geology, geohydrology, and geomorphology. 
Techniques include electro-magnetic, radar, sonar, and 
magnetism. 

GEOL 4670/6670. Environmental Instrumental 
Analysis. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L. 

Lecture and laboratory course emphasizing principles 
and practical experience in chemical analysis of sedi- 
ments, rocks and water, with particular emphasis on 
environmentally important organic and inorganic con- 
taminants. 

GEOL(ANTH) 4700/6700. Archaeological Geology. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (GEOL 1121 and GEOL 
1121L) or GEOL 1250-1250L or permission of de- 
partment. 

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth sci- 
ence methods and theories in the study of archaeolog- 
ical sites and their contents. The four major areas 
covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geol- 
ogy; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration 
techniques; (4) artifact characterization. 

GEOL 4750/6750. Earth Sciences for Middle 
School Teachers. 4 hours. 

Fundamentals of earth sciences for middle school 
teachers. Map interpretation; minerals and rocks; prin- 
ciples of astronomy, meteorology and oceanography. 
Processes at the surface and inside the Earth. 
Emphasis on plate tectonics; geologic time scale, evo- 
lution of life, and a study of fossils. Geology and re- 
sources of Georgia. 

GEOL 4900/6900. Seminar in Geohydrology. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Current and classical studies in geohydrology. 

GEOL 4910/6910. Seminar in Geochemistry. 1 hour. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Current and classical studies in geochemistry. 

GEOL 4920/6920. Seminar for Geology Teaching 

Assistants. 1 hour. 

Discussion of the delivery of geology laboratory ma- 
terial, including presentation techniques, attendance 
policy, grading, and support systems. 

GEOL 4950/6950. Geology Seminar. 1 hour Repeat 

able for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Reviews and discussions of current research topics. 



GEOL 6130. Aqueous Environmental Geochem- 
istry. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 4110/6110. 
Chemical behavior of natural aquatic systems: chemi- 
cal kinetic and equilibrium relationships controlling 
the quality of surface and subsurface waters, both pris- 
tine and polluted. Distribution and behavior of chemi- 
cal species in aqueous environments. 

GEOL 7000. Master's Research. 1-12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

GEOL 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 24 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

GEOL 8010. Advanced Topics in Archaeological 

Geology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Intensive study under the direction of staff members 

on approved topics. 

GEOL 8020. Advanced Topics in Geochemistry. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8030. Advanced Topics in Geophysics. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8040. Advanced Topics in Hydrogeology. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8050. Advanced Topics in Mineralogy. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive study under the direction of a staff member 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8060. Advanced Topics in Paleobiology. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8070. Advanced Topics in Petrology. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8080. Advanced Topics in Sedimentary Ge- 
ology. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics 



172 / The University of Georgia 



Geology 



GEOL 8090. Advanced Topics in Structural Geol- 
ogy. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Intensive study under the direction of staff members 
on approved topics. 

GEOL 8100. Microchemical Analysis of Geologic 
Materials. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 6 hours lab per 
week. 

Theoretical and laboratory study of microchemical an- 
alytical techniques commonly used to analyze the 
composition of geologic materials. Includes training 
on the operation of the JEOL 8600 Superprobe for 
geochemical analysis. 

GEOL 8110. Paleooceanography. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 4010-4010L and GEOL 4090/ 
6090. 

History of temporal and environmental changes in 
physical, chemical, and biological components of the 
ocean as recorded in deep-sea sediments and oceanic 
crust. Emphasis is placed on the role of paleoclimates 
in the evolution of the ocean. 

GEOL 8120. Paleobiodiversity. 3 hours. 3 hours lab 
per week. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 4520/6520 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Pattern, process and causal mechanisms of modern 
and fossil biodiversity issues. 

GEOL 8130. Paleocom muni ties. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 401 0-40 10L. 
Geologic history and paleoecology of fossil associa- 
tions through time with emphasis on the marine fossil 
record. 

GEOL 8140. Sequence Stratigraphy. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 401 0-40 10L. 
Principles of sequence stratigraphy. Roles of sediment 
supply, subsidence, and eustasy in the accumulation of 
sediments on time scales of tens of thousands of years 
and longer. 

GEOL 8150. Earth Surface Geochemistry. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 41 10/61 10. 
Geochemical principles, materials, and processes re- 
lated to the near-earth-surface environment. Systems 
studied include weathering and shallow groundwater; 
rivers, lakes, and oceans; diagenesis and deep ground- 
water; and the linkage of the rock and water cycles. 

GEOL 8160. Advanced Igneous Petrology. 3 hours 
2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 4300/6300. 
Mineralogy, petrology, and chemical compositions ol 
igneous rocks. Origin and evolution of magmas and 
the causes and characteristics of volcanic eruptions in- 
cluding effects on climate and societies 

GEOL 8180. Sandstone Petrology. 3 hours 2 hours 

lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 3010-30101.. 

Petrology of sandstones: classifications, mineralogy, 



geochemistry, provenance, diagenesis, porosity, and 
hydrogeology of sandstones. Laboratory examination 
of sandstone mineralogies and diagenetic fabrics. 

GEOL 8200. Carbonate Petrology. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 301 0-30 10L and GEOL 4010- 
4010L. 

Petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of lime- 
stones, dolostones, speleothems, travertines, and other 
carbonate-bearing geological materials. Precipitation 
of carbonate minerals, origin of carbonate grains, neo- 
morphism, diagenesis, dolomitization, silicification, 
porosity, and permeability in carbonate rocks. 

GEOL 8220. Advanced Metamorphic Petrology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 4300/6300. 

Rigorous and quantitative study of metamorphic rocks 

through the use of chemical thermodynamics. A study 

of chemical equilibrium and solution behavior applied 

to minerals and geologic fluids is followed by specific 

applications to metamorphic rocks. 

GEOL 8250. Plate Tectonics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 4020-4020L. 
Mechanics of plate motion on a sphere; analysis of 
earthquake focal mechanisms and state of stress in the 
lithosphere; paleomagnetism; true polar wander; geo- 
logic processes at plate boundaries; forces driving 
plates. Discussion of papers covering models for con- 
vection, fate of slabs, recent results from global to- 
mography, and regional tectonics. 

GEOL 8270. Continental Tectonics. 3 hours. 3 hours 
lecture and 1 hour lab per week. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 4060/6060. 
Growth and evolution of mountain systems, orogenic 
belts, and related terranes. Emphasis on processes of 
deformation, metamorphism, and crustal growth; char- 
acteristics and evolution of principal structural 
provinces; plate tectonic driving forces; relations be- 
tween deformation, magmatism, and sedimentation. 
Different orogenic belts, ancient and modern, used as 
comparative examples. 

GEOL 8460. Isotope Geochemistry. 3 hours 2 hours 

lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 4020-4020L and GEOL 4110/ 

6110. 

Theory of isotope fractionation and radioactive decay. 

Analytical methods tor measurement of isotope ratios. 

Applications Of isotope methods in the earth sciences 

including age dating, studies of chemical cycles in the 

environment, and evolution ol inorganic and organic 

systems 

GEOL 8600. Advanced Topics in Seismology. 
1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: (GEOL 4O2O-4O20L and MATH 22\o 
and MATH 22 1 01 and PHYS 1212-1212L) Of permis- 
sion ot department. 

Topics in theoretical and observational seismology. 
Wave propagation, time series analysis, geophysical 



Graduate School Description of i 173 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



data processing, inverse theory, and seismic array 
studies of the lithosphere, mantle and core. Topics to 
vary from year to year. 

GEOL 8700. Physical Hydrogeology. 3 hours. 
Mathematical treatment of subsurface flow and trans- 
port using the hydraulic approach. Both regional and 
local problems are examined. Emphasis is on selecting 
the appropriate differential equation and boundary 
conditions to adequately describe a problem. Practical 
applications are used to illustrate the approach. 

(GEOL)FORS 8730. Aquifer Mechanics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: FORS 41 10/61 10 or GEOL 4220/6220 or 
GEOG 4030/6030 or CRSS 4600/6600-4600L/6600L 
or permission of school. 

Mechanics of flow through subsurface media, includ- 
ing flow in confined, water table, and leaky aquifers, 
delayed yield, partially penetrating wells, boundaries, 
multiple wells, dual porosity media, and fractured 
rock; use of aquifer tests to estimate aquifer hydraulic 
properties. 

GEOL(FORS) 8740. Hydrologic Flow and Trans- 
port Modeling. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
lab per week. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 8700 or FORS 4120/6120. 
Solutions of surface and subsurface flow and transport 
problems including finite difference, finite element, 
and boundary integral methods. Analytic techniques 
include Laplace-, z-, and Fourier-transform, complex 
variable, and separation of variables methods. Appli- 
cation to problems commonly found in the environ- 
mental field, including capture zones, particle-tracking, 
advection-dispersion, and non-aqueous phase liquids. 

GEOL 8750. Environmental Organic Geochem- 
istry. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 221 1L and 
GEOL 1 260- 1260L. 

Origin and distribution of organic compounds in 
rocks, soils, and water. Biochemistry of major classes 
of organic compounds found in rocks, soils, and min- 
erals. Emphasis on anthropocentric contamination and 
geochemistry of remediation. 

GEOL(CRSS) 8760. Organic Contaminant Hydro- 
geology. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: (CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or 
(CHEM 22 1 2 and CHEM 22 1 2L) or permission of de- 
partment. 

Physical and chemical processes controlling the mo- 
bility and fate of organic contaminants in soils, sedi- 
ments, surface, and ground waters. Processes include 
biotic and abiotic (hydrolysis, volatilization, sorption, 
redox, and photochemical) reactions in the natural sys- 
tems. Relationships between chemical structure and 
reactivity in the environment. 

GEOL 8770. Hazardous Waste Site Remediation. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 6130 and EHSC 4350/6350- 

4350L/6350L. 

The current state of environmental pollution and the 



application of innovative technologies in clean-up of 
contaminated soil, sediment, and groundwater. Evalu- 
ate the performance and limitations of existing tech- 
nologies due to site heterogeneity. 

GEOL 8780. Environmental Isotopes. 3 hours. 
2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
The use of naturally occurring stable and radiogenic 
isotopes for solving environmental problems. 
Principles of isotope fractionation, radionuclide count- 
ing methods, applications to solving hydrologic prob- 
lems, and laboratory techniques for analyzing O-and 
H-, C-stable isotopes and H-and Rn-radiogenic iso- 
topes. 

GEOL 8790. Special Projects in Hydrogeology and 
Environmental Geology. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 
6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: GEOL 8700 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Environmental geological problems such as sanitary 
landfills, underground storage tank contaminated sites, 
mine land pollution areas, and hydrological assess- 
ment of wetlands. 

GEOL 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-12 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

GEOL 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 24 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Germanic and Slavic 
Languages 

Max Reinhart, Head 

Renate Born, Graduate Coordinator, 542-2457 

(Joseph Brown Hall) 

The German Program in the Department of Ger- 
manic and Slavic Languages offers the MA de- 
gree with a concentration in either literature or 
linguistics. Requirements for the degree are 30 
credit hours of course work, a thesis, a final ex- 
amination and a reading examination (or a grade 
of B in a course at the 2002 level or higher) in a 
modern foreign language besides German. In 
addition to comprehensive training in the disci- 
pline, the department also provides candidates 
the opportunity to develop elementary and inter- 
mediate language teaching skills while serving 
as teaching assistants. A full description of the 



174 / The University of Georgia 



Germanic and Slavic Languages 



I program and the requirements may be obtained 
at the departmental web-site: www.uga.edu/ 
gslangs/grad.html or by contacting the graduate 
coordinator. 



German 

GRMN 4001/6001. Advanced German Conversa- 
tion and Composition. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GRMN 3002. 
Vocabulary building and review of grammar. Empha- 
sis on common errors of English speakers and on dis- 
tinctions in meaning. 

GRMN 4300/6300. German Literature from the 
Enlightenment through Classicism. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GRMN 3001. 
Representative readings from Enlightenment, 
Empfindsamkeit, Storm and Stress, and Classicism. 
Includes texts that provide background on eighteenth- 
century political, social, and cultural developments. 

GRMN 4400/6400. German Literature from Ro- 
manticism through Realism. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GRMN 3001. 
Representative readings from early to late Romanti- 
cism, Junges Deutschland, Vormaerz, Biedermeier, 
and Realism. Includes texts that provide background 
on nineteenth-century political, social, and cultural de- 
velopments. 

GRMN(LING) 4460/6460. Structure of Modern 
German. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GRMN 3001. 
Linguistic and sociolinguistic structures of modem 
German with relevant linguistic terminology. Empha- 
sis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Taught in 
English. 

GRMN 4500/6500. German Literature from Natu- 
ralism to the Present. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GRMN 3001. 
Representative readings from Naturalism, Impression- 
ism, Expressionism, wartime and post-war literature, 
literature of the GDR, and contemporary literature 
through post-unification. Includes texts that provide 
background on twentieth-century political, social, and 
cultural developments. 

GRMN 6100. Medieval German Literature. 

3 hours. 

Medieval German literature from approximately 800 
to 1350. Representative readings from the Old High 
German and Middle High German periods. Includes 
texts that provide background on medieval political, 
social, and cultural developments 

GRMN 6200. Early Modern German Literature. 

3 hours. 

German literature from approximately 1350 to 1740. 
Representative readings from Humanism, Renais- 
sance, Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and the 
Baroque. Includes vernacular and neo-Latin literature 



by German writers; effect of social, political, religious, 
and intellectual currents on the German Republic of 
Letters is considered. 

GRMN(LING) 6380. Contrastive Grammar: Ger- 
man-English. 3 hours. 

Identification and examination of the salient structural 
similarities and differences between German and Eng- 
lish. 

GRMN(LING) 6600. History of the German Lan- 
guage. 3 hours. 

The origins of modern standard German from the 
Indo-European parent language through proto-Ger- 
manic, Old and Middle High German, and the early 
modern period. 

GRMN(LING) 6810. German Phonology and Mor- 
phology. 3 hours. 

Theoretical and applied German phonology and word 
structure. Taught in English. 

GRMN 7000. Master's Research. 3-6 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 27 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

GRMN 7300. Master's Thesis. 3-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 27 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

GRMN(LING) 7500. Problems and Methods of 
Teaching College German. 3 hours. 
Methods for teaching foreign language and develop- 
ment of language skills in German. For teaching assis- 
tants in German and graduate students in German and 
Language Education. Taught in English. 

GRMN(LING) 8320. Gothic. 3 hours. 
Morphology, phonology, and history of the Gothic lan- 
guage based on extant texts. Emphasis on the develop- 
ment of earlier stages of the language and on its later 
language forms. Taught in English. 

GRMN(LING) 8400. Middle High German. 

3 hours. 

Phonology and grammar of the language, with exten- 
sive readings in the prose, epic, and lyric poetry of the 
Middle High German era. 

GRMN 8410. Proseminar. 3 hours 
Bibliography and methodology of research in German 
literature and linguistics. Sur\e\ of literary theory. Re- 
quired of all graduate students in German 

GRMN(LING) 8510. Seminar in German Linguis- 
tics. 3 hours. Repeatable tor maximum l > hours credit. 
Intensive investigation of i subject or topic in German 

linguistics. Taught in English. 



Graduate School Description of Courses 175 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



GRMN(LING) 8520. Seminar in German Lan- 
guage Variation. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Intensive investigation of synchronic and diachronic 
variation in German. Taught in English. 

GRMN 8530. Seminar in German Literature. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Intensive investigation of a particular genre, theme, 
topic, or author. 

GRMN 8540. Seminar in German Studies. 3 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 

Intensive investigation of a particular theme or topic. 

Russian 

RUSS 6980. Directed Study in Russian Literature. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Individual study, reading, or projects in Russian litera- 
ture under the supervision of a project director. 

RUSS 6990. Directed Study in Russian and Slavic 
Linguistics. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Individual study, reading, or projects in Russian and 
Slavic linguistics under the supervision of a project di- 
rector. 



Gerontology 



tant Director. The courses having a Gerontology 
prefix are listed below. 

GRNT 4010/6010. Human Physical Aging. 3 hours. 
The physiological and anatomical changes that occur 
as a person ages. The basics of the biology of aging 
followed by a system by system description of the 
aging phenomena in the human body. 

GRNT 6000. Seminar in Aging. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Basic concepts of gerontology in an interdisciplinary 
setting to provide the student with a theoretical frame- 
work upon which to base further study and research in 
the field of aging. 

GRNT 6390. Service Learning with the Elderly. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Supervised field experience designed to assist in rein- 
forcing knowledge, theories, and principles gained 
through courses in or related to the field of gerontol- 
ogy. 

GRNT 8000. Advanced Topics in Gerontological 
Research and Theory. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Interdisciplinary topics and new developments in 
gerontological research and theory, focused on a spe- 
cific theme. 

GRNT 8010. Advanced Topics in Gerontology 

Practice. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Interdisciplinary topics on new developments in the 

practice of gerontology. 



Leonard W. Poon, Director 

Philip A. Holtsberg, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-3954 
(Candler Hall) 

The University of Georgia has a strong commit- 
ment to gerontology training. Training in geron- 
tology is directed through the Gerontology 
Center, which offers a Graduate Certificate in 
Gerontology to complement students' master's 
and doctoral training. The Certificate requires 18 
semester hours of graduate course work in aging 
(from a variety of departments) including three 
semester hours of field experience or three se- 
mester hours of research. Please see Index for 
detailed information on courses and require- 
ments. Many other courses that are part of the 
University of Georgia's commitment to geron- 
tology training and that qualify for the Certifi- 
cate in Gerontology exist. They arc listed in the 
academic unit charged to offer the course. For a 
complete and current list of all such courses, 
please contact the Gerontology Center's Assis- 



Global Policy Studies 



William O. Chittick, Graduate Coordinator. 

542-5747 
(Baldwin Hall) 

Please see Index for information on the certifi- 
cate program in global policy studies. The 
courses having a global policy studies prefix are 
listed below. 

GPST 6000. Global Policy Analysis. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Six hours of graduate credit. Interdisci- 
plinary and multilevel analyses of global policy prob- 
lems in the domains of identity, security, and 
prosperity. Special emphasis on cooperative or collec- 
tive action solutions to these problems. 

GPST 7500. Global Policy Internship. 3 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Six hours of graduate credit. Academic 
portion of an internship providing work or field expe- 
rience in global policy studies. 



176 /The University oj Georgia 



Gerontology • Global Policy Studies • History 



History 



James C. Cobb, Head 

Michael P. Winship, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2531 
(LeConte Hall) 

The history department offers work leading to 
the MA and PhD degrees. The MA program in 
history consists of 30 semester hours, including 
HIST 7900 (Theory and Practice of History) and 
two other 8000-level courses. Additional re- 
quirements are: two colloquia in the major field 
(American or European) and one colloquium in 
the minor field (American, European or other 
approved graduate course), reading competence 
in a foreign language, a thesis, and an oral ex- 
amination. The PhD student must demonstrate 
through both written and oral examinations a 
thorough knowledge of four fields of history or 
three fields of history and a fourth field in an- 
other discipline. In addition, PhD students must 
complete HIST 7910 (Teaching History in Col- 
leges and Universities), two colloquia in the 
major field (American or European), one collo- 
quium in the minor field (American, European, 
or other approved graduate course), and a mini- 
mum of 6 semester hours of 8000-level courses. 
However, if HIST 7910 (or its equivalent) has 
not been completed, it may be taken with the 
permission of the major professor and the en- 
dorsement of the graduate coordinator and be 
counted in fulfillment of part of the additional 
seminar requirement. A reading competence in 
two foreign languages is required of all doctoral 
candidates, but with the permission of the major 
professor and the endorsement of the graduate 
coordinator, two courses in quantitative method- 
ology may be substituted for one foreign lan- 
guage. A dissertation may be presented in 
United States, European, or other selected fields 
of history. Students holding a BA degree may be 
admitted into the doctoral program. The PhD re- 
quires 30 semester hours beyond the MA for a 
total of 60 semester hours. 

The graduate program stresses research and 
writing under faculty guidance. In addition, stu- 
dents possessing the MA degree may receive 
practical experience in teaching by holding 
teaching assistantships. The department awards 
a number of teaching assistantships and non- 
teaching assistantships each year. Application 
for these should be made directly to the Gradu- 



ate Coordinator of History. The deadline for ap- 
plications for financial assistance is January 1. 

HIST 4000/6000. Studies in American History. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 
A special subject not otherwise offered in the history 
curriculum. Topics, methodology, and instructors vary 
from semester to semester. Normally, no more than 
two such courses may be counted toward the major or 
the minor in history, exceptions being made only by 
the Coordinator of Instruction. 

HIST 4030/6030. Politics of Morality in the United 
States. 3 hours. 

Origin of selected political and moral dilemmas in 
American multicultural contexts from the Colonial to 
the Contemporary period. 

HIST 4040/6040. Working Class America. 3 hours 
Using fiction and film as well as traditional texts, the 
history of working-class women and men in the United 
States. The emphasis will be on the everyday lives of 
the laborers — what they did at work and at home, in 
the union hall, and on the picket line. 

HIST 4050/6050. American Lives. 3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Biographies and autobiographies to explore a variety 
of themes and issues in American history. Emphases 
will differ depending on instructor: focus may be nine- 
teenth century, twentieth century, women, race, south- 
ern autobiography, etc. 

HIST(AFAM) 4055/6055. Historical Survey of 
African American Thought. 3 hours. 
This course examines representative works of such 
nineteenth- and twentieth-century social, cultural, and 
political thinkers as Frederick Douglass, Cornel West, 
Anna J. Cooper, and Angela Davis among other out- 
standing women and men who have contributed sig- 
nificantly to the intellectual life of the African 
American community. 

HIST 4060/6060. American Legal History. 3 hours 
American legal thought, institutions, and education, 
focusing on the impact of social, political, and eco- 
nomic forces on the legal system. The English back- 
ground, colonial period, legal foundations of the new 
nation, and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

HIST 4070/6070. Jeffersonian and Jacksonian 
America. 3 hours. 

History of the U.S. from the early republic through the 
antebellum period, with emphasis on territorial expan- 
sion, industrialization, the first and second political 

systems, and the emergence of the sectional crisis 

HIS I 4071/6071. Antebellum South. 3 hours 

A chronological and thematic history of the South 
from Spanish exploration and Jamestown's settlement 
through the secession crisis of 1860-1861, with an em- 
phasis on the social, cultural, economic, and political 
aspects of southern lite in the colonial and antebellum 

periods. 



Graduate School Description oj < 'oui res 177 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



HIST 4072/6072. The Civil War Period of Ameri- 
can History. 3 hours. 

The origin, conduct, and legacy of the war and the im- 
pact of the conflict upon peoples and institutions. 

HIST 4073/6073. The Era of Reconstruction, 1865- 

1877. 3 hours. 

The process of reunion, especially in the American 

South, with emphasis upon the experience of African 

Americans. 

HIST 4074/6074. The South Since Reconstruction. 

3 hours. 

Economic, social, cultural, and political developments 

in the South since Reconstruction. 

HIST 4075/6075. Scientific Interests in the South. 

3 hours. 

Scientific inquiry in the southeastern region of the 
United States. Stresses cultural and intellectual milieu, 
examines special role of natural history, and compares 
inquiries of southern scientists with those of other con- 
temporary United States scientists. 

HIST 4080/6080. Politics of Gender in United 
States History. 3 hours. 

Representations of women's power historically, evalu- 
ated critically in terms of gender, race, and class. 

HIST 4091/6091. Problems in American Foreign 
Policy, 1776-Present. 3 hours. 
Selected problems related to United States foreign pol- 
icy. 

HIST 4092/6092. The United States in the Era of 

the Cold War. 3 hours. 

The political, diplomatic, military, and social history 

of the United States during the era of the Cold War 

(1946-1992). 

HIST 4100/6100. History of Georgia. 3 hours. 
Using historical scholarship, biography, and film, the 
Georgia past from pre-history to the present. 
Themes of race, class, and modernization in the devel- 
opment of Georgia; special emphasis on the lives of 
everyday Georgians at various points in history. 

HIST 4110/6110. Multicultural Georgia. 3 hours. 
The history of the state, with an emphasis on its racial, 
ethnic, religious, gender, and regional diversity, to be 
examined through historical documents, novels, short 
stories, folklore, memoirs, music, and film. 

(HIST)FSOC 4150/6150. Teaching United States 
History. 3 hours. 

Classic historiography and current debates among his- 
torians over major themes and events in United States 
history. Examination of ways in which this historical 
scholarship can be incorporated into social studies 
teaching. Evaluation of materials and methods used to 
teach United States history in secondary and middle 
schools. 

HIST 4200/6200. Studies in Latin American His- 
tory. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Special issues or topics in Latin American history not 



covered in a regular history course. Topics, methodol- 
ogy, and instructor vary from semester to semester. 
Representative topics include the Latin American rev- 
olutionary tradition, the wars of independence in the 
Americas, and Latin American wars. 

HIST 4210/6210. Latin America: A Socioeconomic 
History Since 1930. 3 hours. 

Latin American social and economic development 
from the onset of the Depression until the present. The 
role of the state in economic development; the impact 
of modernization on traditional social systems; persis- 
tence of social inequity amidst development; and the 
liberal and revolutionary responses to social needs. 

HIST 4220/6220. The United States and Latin 
America. 3 hours. 

The political, economic, and cultural relations be- 
tween the United States and Latin America from 1776 
to the present. Spanish-American revolutions, the 
Monroe doctrine, United States expansionism, the Pan 
American system, United States intervention, the 
Good Neighbor policy, Latin America in the Cold War, 
and United States and Latin American revolutions. 

HIST(CLAS) 4225/6225. Medicine, Healing, and 
the Body in Ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours. 
The origins of the rationalist tradition in medicine; 
folk and cult methods of healing; the medical con- 
struction of gender differences; attitudes toward the 
body, including asceticism; and topics in the social 
history of medicine (such as childbirth, disease, and 
medical society) will be explored. 

HIST 4300/6300. Studies in European History. 

3 hours. 

Topical studies that vary by year and instructor. Topics 
might include "Art and Society in the Age of the Re- 
formation," "War and Gender in Twentieth-Century 
Europe," "Society and Culture in the Medieval Euro- 
pean City," and "Imperialism and Anti-imperialism in 
Modern Europe." 

HIST(CLAS) 4312/6312. The Hellenistic World. 

3 hours. 

Problems in Hellenistic history from 330 B.C. to the 
Roman conquest with emphasis on the Antigonid, Se- 
leucid, and Ptolemaic dynasties. 

HIST(CLAS) 4320/6320. Law and Society in the 
Greco-Roman World. 3 hours. 
Law and its functions in ancient society from archaic 
Greece through the fifth century A.D. Includes discus- 
sion of Greek, Roman, and Christian legal codes, legal 
procedure, and the theory of law; also of law as a 
source tor social history, especially issues of gender, 
class, crime, and the ancient economy. 

HIST(CLAS) 4321/6321. The Roman Republic. 

3 hours. 

Roman history to the end of the republic. 

HIST(CLAS) 4322/6322. The Roman Empire. 

3 hours. 

History of the Roman Empire from 27 B.C. to A.D. 



178 / The University of Georgia 



History 



337 with special emphasis on the government of Au- 
gustus, reasons for its decline, and the final attempt at 
unification of the empire under Constantine. 

HIST(CLAS) 4329/6329. Studies in Ancient Greek 
and Roman History. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 6 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 
Topics in ancient history that vary by year and instruc- 
tor. Subject matter may include, for example, "The 
Hellenistic World"; "The Social History of the Roman 
Empire"; "Late Antiquity." 

HIST 4330/6330. Institutions of the Medieval West. 

3 hours. 

A variety of specific topics in medieval history, such 
as law and justice, Anglo-Saxon England, politics of 
the family, and attitudes toward gender and sexuality. 

HIST 4340/6340. Rebirth and Reinvention in Early 
Modern Europe. 3 hours. 

European society in the context of pivotal social, po- 
litical, and intellectual moments, from the growth of 
the Humanist movement to the military revolution. 
The goal is a better understanding of "turning points" 
in history, and their creation and definition. 

HIST 4350/6350. Material Culture and Consumer 
Society in Early Modern Europe. 3 hours. 
Examines the origins of modern consumerism by 
looking at production and consumption in pre-indus- 
trial Europe. Treats the circulation, possession, and 
meaning of goods such as clothes, food, books, and 
objects of art. Themes include consumption as a sign 
of social status, popular and learned attitudes toward 
markets, and luxury. 

HIST 4360/6360. European Popular Culture. 3 hours. 
The symbols, expressions, and entertainments that all 
Europeans drew upon from the wealthiest and best ed- 
ucated to the poorest and illiterate. Themes may in- 
clude material culture, gender identities, folktales, 
reading practices, religion and worship, music and 
theatre. Taught as a seminar with extensive readings in 
primary and secondary sources. 

HIST 4371/6371. The Medieval Mind. 3 hours 
The intellectual history of medieval Europe. The na- 
ture of Christian behavior will be examined in the de- 
velopment of premodern ideas on the human body, 
politics, law, and religion. 

HIST 4372/6372. Intellectual History in Early 
Modern Europe. 3 hours. 

The intellectual heritage ol early modern Europe. Stu- 
dents will study the works of humanists, theologians, 
and philosophers, as well as evaluate the social context 
in which those works were produced. 

HIST 4373/6373. Nineteenth-Century European 
Intellectual History. 3 hours 

European thought from 1813- 1914. with emphasis on 
the relationship between ideas and their political and 
social context. 



HIST 4374/6374. Intellectual History of Twentieth- 
Century Europe. 3 hours. 

Major trends and innovations in European intellectual 
life, from the fin-de-sPecle revolt against positivism to 
post-structuralism and its critics. Coverage will in- 
clude such thinkers as Freud, Weber, and Foucault, as 
well as such wider cultural movements as futurism, 
surrealism, and existentialism. 

HIST 4381/6381. Politics, Culture, and Society in 
Stuart England. 3 hours. 

Religious, political, and cultural upheavals under the 
Stuart monarchs, 1603-1704. 

HIST 4382/6382. Britain from the Age of Revolu- 
tion to the Age of Victoria 1780-1900. 3 hours. 
Britain in the age of the American War of Indepen- 
dence, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Rev- 
olution. Special attention will be paid to political 
culture, intellectual change, and economic develop- 
ment. 

HIST 4383/6383. Britain 1901 to the Present. 

3 hours. 

Political culture, intellectual change, and economic/ 

imperial readjustment in twentieth-century Britain and 

beyond. 

HIST 4391/6391. The French Revolution and the 
First Empire. 3 hours. 

The causes and course of Europe's first modern revo- 
lution and its reconfiguration by Napoleon Bonaparte. 
Students will read primary sources and a rich contem- 
porary historiography which illuminate official and 
popular efforts to reshape government, society, and 
culture. Taught as a seminar with extensive readings. 

HIST 4392/6392. Twentieth-Century France. 

3 hours. 

The history of France in the twentieth century, with an 

emphasis on politics and social change. 

HIST 4400/6400. The Age of World Wars I and II. 

3 hours. 

The origins, course, nature, and consequences of 

World Wars I and II in Europe, 1870-1950. 

HIST 4410/6410. Nazism and Fascism in Europe, 
1919-1945. 3 hours 

The two totalitarian movements, Italian Fascism and 
German National Socialism (Nazism), emphasizing 
the intellectual origins of antidemocratic impulses be 
fore and after 1919, the unique social and political fac- 
tors present in each nation, the personalities of Hitler 
and Mussolini, and the growth of the totalitarian one- 
part) state. 

MIS I 4420/6420. Holocausts in Histor>. 3 hours 
The Jewish Holocaust 1933-1945, emphasizing histor- 
ical precedents and consequences. Traditional reli- 
gious anti-Semitism, biologically-based racism, and 
extreme nationalism will be investigated as sources of 
modern genocidal behavior. 



Graduate St hoot Description oj ( 1 79 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



HIST 4500/6500. Studies in African or Middle 
Eastern History. 3 hours. 

Topics in modern and ancient Middle Eastern or 
African history. Non-traditional methodologies and 
sources are combined to introduce students to emerg- 
ing issues in African or Middle Eastern history. 

HIST 4510/6510. History of Famine and Food Sys- 
tems in Africa. 3 hours. 

African agricultural achievement, theories of produc- 
tion and famine systems, and attempts by colonial and 
international capital to control African food systems. 
Literature is a major source. 

HIST 4530/6530. The History of Orientalism. 

3 hours. 

Images and symbolism used by Europeans and Amer- 
icans to define the Islamic Middle East. The history of 
the Middle East through representation — stereotypes, 
myths, fairy tales, novels, films, and news coverage — 
particularly the ramifications of these images on West- 
ern foreign policy towards the Islamic Middle East. 

HIST 4540/6540. Conflict in Twentieth-Century 
Southern Africa. 3 hours. 

South Africa's economic, political and military might 
has shaped other southern African societies (Namibia, 
Lesotho, Botswana, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, and 
Mozambique) in the twentieth century. Reform and 
revolution which Africans and Europeans employed to 
regain and maintain African independence in the re- 
gion. 

HIST 4550/6550. Christianity and Colonialism in 
Africa. 3 hours. 

Christianity was both ally and adversary to colonial- 
ism, threatening African "tradition" and aiding a vocal 
westernized elite which shaped independent African 
nations. African initiatives in Christian conversion, 
colonial Christianity, Africans in mission communi- 
ties, mission education and westernized elites, inde- 
pendent African religious movements, and 
Christianity and African nationalism. 

HIST 4600/6600. Studies in Asian History. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
A special issue or topic not otherwise offered in the 
history curriculum. Topics, methodology, and instruc- 
tors will vary from semester to semester. Representa- 
tive topics include "Japan and the Samurai," "Women, 
Gender and Family in Traditional Japan," and "Court 
and Countryside in Japan's Golden Age." 

HIS! 4700/6700. Themes in Comparative History. 

3 hours. 

A special subject not otherwise offered in the history 
curriculum. Topics, methodology, and instructors vary 
from semester to semester. 

HIST 4750/6750. History and Film. 3 hours 
We are Living in a post-literate age. Most people now 
get their history from films instead of books. How 
film, using a different vocabulary than that of books, 
recreates the past. 



HIST(PHIL) 4860/6860. History, History of Philos- 
ophy, Philosophy. 3 hours. 

Historians and philosophers differ in the source of ev- 
idence and arguments they use and in the standards to 
which they appeal. Nonetheless, works in each of 
these fields raise questions relevant to the other field. 
The purpose of this course is to explore the main rela- 
tionships between these two fields. 

(HIST)EDHI 4900/6900. History of American Col- 
lege and University. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: HIST 2111 and HIST 
2112. 

History of American colleges and universities from 
1619 to the present. Major topics include student life, 
European antecedents, the nature of the university, the 
impact of religion, the rise of athletics, the culture of 
collegiate life, and the influence of society. 

HIST 4960/6960. Directed Readings in History. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Individual study, reading, or projects under the direc- 
tion of a project director. 
Non-traditional format: Directed study. 

HIST 6521. Eastern Africa to 1800. 3 hours. 
Economic, political, and cultural history of eastern 
Africa to 1800. The origins of agropastoralism, and 
rise and growth of city-states and kingdoms, the Indian 
Ocean trading network, and slavery. 

HIST 6522. Eastern Africa 1800 to Present. 3 hours. 
Economic and cultural history of east Africa from 
1800- 1900s. Regional systems of food production, 
trade, and ethnicity, missionary and merchant activity, 
colonial penetration, African nationalism and indepen- 
dence. 

HIST 6531. Africans in the Americas. 3 hours. 
Fifteenth- to nineteenth-century political, social, eco- 
nomic connections between North, Central, South 
America and Caribbean and west, west-central Africa. 

HIST 6611. Premodern Japan: A Survey for Grad- 
uate Students. 3 hours. 
Not open to students with credit in HIST 3601. 
Ancient and medieval Japan, focusing on the institu- 
tional and cultural foundations of the Japanese state. 

HIST 6612. Modern Japan: A Survey for Graduate 
Students. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in HIST 3602. 
Early modern and modern Japan: the transformation of 
Japan from an isolationist, agrarian country to a mili- 
tary giant, to a broken and defeated nation, to an eco- 
nomic superpower. 

HIST 6671. Traditional China. 3 hours 
Intellectual, political, economic, social, literary, reli- 
gious, and diplomatic developments of China from its 
beginnings to the Sung Dynasty. Influences of Confu- 
cianism, Daoism, and Buddhism on Chinese identity; 
development and influence of the "Shung-Guo" (Cen- 
tral Kingdom); trade-tribute concepts; the importance 
of the growth of the family system and gender views. 



180 / The University of Georgia 



History 



HIST 6672. Transitional China. 3 hours. 
Internal/external influences that challenge the tradi- 
tions and cause changes. Influences of nomadic in- 
vaders — the Mongols and Manchus — on social and 
political history, and Buddhist and Daoist influences 
on Neo-Confucianism. Also, the impact of Christian 
missionaries and western merchants on modifications 
of political and economic institutions. 

HIST 6673. History of China III: Revolutionary 
China. 3 hours. 

End of nineteenth through twentieth century, focusing 
on the Republic of China, its establishment, develop- 
ment, and troubles; the rise of Nationalism and Com- 
munism; establishment, development, and troubles of 
the People's Republic of China; emphasis on what rev- 
olutions have occurred in China, the leaders, their im- 
portant ideas/impact. 

HIST 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

HIST 7001. Colloquium in North American His- 
tory: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. 

3 hours. 

Major themes in the recent literature on early modern 

Atlantic rim/North American history. 

HIST 7002. Colloquium in United States History: 
Nineteenth Century. 3 hours. 
Colloquium in which topics, issues, and recent trends 
in American nineteenth-century history are explored 
historiographically and thematically. 

HIST 7003. Colloquium in United States History: 

Twentieth Century. 3 hours. 

United States history of the twentieth century. 

HIST 7200. Area Colloquium. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Readings and discussions on major themes in the his- 
tory and historiography of a geographical area. Time 
period and area will vary with the instructor. 

HIST 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

HIST 7321. Colloquium in Premodern European 
History. 3 hours. 

The gradual discovery of the individual in premodern 
Europe. The areas of religion, politics, law, art, and lit- 
erature. Readings will range from Plato and Thomas 
Aquinas to Dante and Leonardo da Vinci. 

HIST 7322. Colloquium in Early Modern Europe. 

3 hours. 

Major themes and current historiograph) ol Europe 

from 1 350 to 1 750. 



HIST 7323. Colloquium in Nineteenth-Century Eu- 
ropean History. 3 hours. 
European history from 1750 to 1870. 

HIST 7324. Colloquium in Twentieth-Century Eu- 
rope. 3 hours. 

Major issues in the history and historiography of Eu- 
rope from 1900 to the present. 

HIST 7600. Colloquium in Asian History. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Readings on and discussion of major issues in the his- 
tory and historiography of Asia. Countries and periods 
of focus will vary from semester to semester. 

HIST 7700. Colloquium in Comparative History. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Readings and discussion of major topics in the theory 
and practice of comparative history. 

HIST 7710. Colloquium on Gender in History. 

3 hours. 

Recent scholarship on gender in European History. 
The time period of the subject matter will vary with 
the instructor. 

HIST 7720. Colloquium in Warfare in History. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
The history of warfare in the context of the warring so- 
cieties from ancient to modern times. Topics depend 
on interest of the instructor. 

HIST 7900. Theory and Practice of History. 3 hours 
Methods of research and fundamental theoretical is- 
sues pertaining to practicing the science of history, 
with emphasis on the development of writing skills. 

HIST 7910. Teaching History in Colleges and Uni- 
versities I. 2 hours. 

The variety of methods appropriate to instruction in 
college-level survey history courses. Students will de- 
velop syllabi and course materials in preparation for 
teaching their own surveys. 

HIST 7911. Teaching History in Colleges and Uni- 
versities II. 1 hour. 
Prerequisite: HIST 7910. 

A continuation of Teaching History in Colleges and 
Universities, taken in conjunction with teaching a col- 
lege-level history survey. Observations and written 
and oral evaluations and discussions of classroom 
management and pedagogical techniques and issues. 

HIST 7920. Independent Reading Colloquium. 

3 hours. Repeatable toi maximum 6 hours credit. 
Readings on major themes in the history and histori- 
ograph) of a geographical area or topic, rune period, 
area, and topic will vat) with the instructor. Ottered on 
request 

(HIS I ilDHI 8000. History of American Higher 

Education. 4 hours 

Development and Scope Ol .American higher educa 

oon 



Graduate School Description oft ourses 1S1 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



HIST 8010. Seminar in Early American History. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
A research seminar in early American history. Native 
Americans, Spanish and French borderlands, British 
settlement, elaboration of colonial institutions, colo- 
nial wars, the American Revolution, and the rise of the 
new nation. 

HIST 8020. Seminar in Middle Period United 
States History. 3-15 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
15 hours credit. 

A research seminar in which students should produce 
a potentially publishable paper upon some topic relat- 
ing to the American South, the American Civil War, or 
Reconstruction. 

HIST 8025. Nineteenth-Century American Com- 
munity History. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
This course on American community studies in the 
nineteenth century explores the study of human rela- 
tionships in a particular locale as effected by larger 
questions: war, race relations, gender and class con- 
flict, industrial change. It considers public as well as 
private space; the mental world of individuals in rela- 
tion to their communities, as well as the social, politi- 
cal, and economic ideology of communities. 

HIST 8027. United States Women, Politics, and 
History. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
This interdisciplinary course investigates reform and 
the changing meaning of gender from the Colonial to 
Post Modern period. An emphasis upon real rather 
than ideological politics is the focus of discussions of 
change and continuity. Other major themes include the 
meaning of politics and the evolution of women's pol- 
itics. 

HIST 8030. Seminar in Recent United States His- 
tory. 3 hours. 

Social, intellectual, cultural, and political develop- 
ments in United States history since 1900. 

HIST 8300. Seminar in Premodern Europe. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Selected topics in premodern European history. 

HIST 8310. Seminar in Early Modern Europe. 

3 hours. 

Research seminar that will allow graduate students to 
work extensively on a particular theme in early mod- 
ern European history, 1350-1815. 

HIST 8320. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Euro- 
pean History. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
6 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Selected research topics in nineteenth-century Euro- 
pean diplomatic, political, social, economic, and intel- 
lectual history. Topics vary. 



HIST 8330. Seminar in Twentieth-Century Europe. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Research in twentieth-century European history. Top- 
ics will vary according to the interests of the students 
and instructors. 

HIST 8700. Seminar in World History. 3 hours. 
Methods, traditions, concepts, and literature of world 
history. 

HIST 8860. Seminar in History. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: HIST 7900 or permission of department. 
Seminar in historical or historiographical subjects for 
second-year masters and doctoral students. 

HIST 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

HIST 9010. Directed Study in History. 1-9 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: HIST 7900 and permission of depart- 
ment. 

Directed study for Ph.D. students who have completed 
all required courses and are preparing for written and 
oral preliminary examinations. 

HIST 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Linguistics 



William G. Provost, Director & Graduate 

Coordinator, 542-2228 
(Park Hall) 

The Linguistics Program at the University of 
Georgia is an interdisciplinary program with 
thirty-one faculty members from nine depart- 
ments in the Franklin College of Arts and Sci- 
ences and three in the College of Education. We 
offer the MA and the PhD degrees. For further 
information, please consult the program's Web 
page at http://www.linguistics.uga.edu, or con- 
tact the Director, Linguistics Program, Athens, 
GA 30602-6205. FAX: 706-542-2897. E-mail to 
request information: admin@linguistics.uga. 
edu. E-mail to contact the Director: director- 
linguistics. uga.edu. 

Our graduate program is comprised of four 
tracks of study from which students may choose 
to satisfy degree requirements: 1) Second Lan- 
guage Acquisition, 2) Cognitive Aspects of Lin- 



182 / The University of Georgia 



Linguistics 



guistics, 3) Historical Linguistics, and 4) Lan- 
guage Variation and Sociolinguistics. 

Second Language Acquisition offers a cur- 
riculum which treats the theoretical bases for 
SLA and is particularly directed at training for 
college-level language teaching. Students may 
follow established course sequences for French, 
Spanish, or German, or may assemble an appro- 
priate set of courses to concentrate on another 
language. The University of Georgia offers MEd 
and PhD degrees in TESOL and Foreign Lan- 
guage Education through the Language Educa- 
tion Department of the College of Education. 

The Cognitive Aspects of Linguistics track in- 
cludes the study of theoretical models that show 
how humans understand language. In conjunc- 
tion with the Departments of Computer Science 
and Philosophy, and with the Artificial Intelli- 
gence Program, the Linguistics Program offers a 
computer-based track that requires a solid 
knowledge of computers and programming. 
Also available is a cognitive linguistics curricu- 
lum that does not require intensive work with 
computers. 

Historical Linguistics involves both the 
methodology for comparison and reconstruction 
of historical languages and an intense, 
hermeneutic approach to studying ancient lan- 
guages individually. Students may acquire a 
close familiarity with the sounds, grammar, and 
vocabulary of languages like ancient Greek, 
Sanskrit, Latin, Old Church Slavic, Classical Ar- 
menian, Old English, and many others. 

Language Variation and Sociolinguistics pro- 
vides its students with training in empirical lin- 
guistics, including the study of the methods 
commonly used in research on language as peo- 
ple speak it. Courses in this track range from 
"American English" and "Language Use in the 
African American Community" to "Discourse 
Analysis" and "Language, Gender, and Culture." 

(LING)ENGL 4000/6000. History of the English 
Language. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or CMLT 2 1 1 1 or CMLT 22 1 or CMLT 
221 2 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 1 or 
ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 
1400. 

The development of present English through the 
stages of Old English, Middle English, and early Mod- 
ern English. Study of elementary phonetics, phone- 
mics, sound change, and dialect variation. 

(LING)ENGL 4010/6010. American English. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 

(LING) 3030 or CMLT 2 1 1 1 or CMLT 22 10 or ( MI I 



22 1 2 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 10 or 

ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 

2400. 

The history, present status, and future prospects of 

American English, including standards and internal 

variation. 

(LING)ENGL 4060/6060. Old English. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or CMLT 21 1 1 or CMLT 2210 or CMLT 
2212 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 10 or 
ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 
2400. 

The language and literature of England before the Nor- 
man Conquest, with reading of selected texts. 

(LING)ANTH 4090/6090. Cognitive Anthropology. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permis- 
sion of major. 

Folk systems of knowledge, with an emphasis on how 
people in different societies culturally identify, define, 
label, and classify phenomena such as color terms, 
plants, animals, and other environmental resources. 

(LING)ENGL 4110/6110. English Grammar. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or CMLT 21 1 1 or CMLT 2210 or CMLT 
22 1 2 or CMLT 2220 or CMLT 2400 or ENGL 23 1 or 
ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 
2400. 

English grammar in the scholarly tradition of Curme 
and Jespersen. 

(LING)CMSD 4120/6120. Anatomy and Physiology 
of Speech, Voice, and Hearing. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Anatomical structures and basic physiological func- 
tions underlying audition, respiration, phonation, ar- 
ticulation, resonance, and swallowing. 

(LING)CMSD 4140/6140. Introduction to Speech 
and Voice Science. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CMSD 4090/6090 and 
CMSD(LING) 4120/6120 and PSYC 1101 and 
(MATH 1 101 or PHYS 1010 or permission of depart- 
ment). 

Application of basic physical principles to production 
and perception of speech and voice. Biomechanics of 
vocal told oscillation; acoustics of voice source; reso- 
nance; acoustic phonetics; psychoacOUStics o\ speech 
and voice. Interpretation of objective measures and 
outputs of computational models. 

(UNG)GREK(LATN) 4150/6150. Comparative 

Grammar of Greek and latin. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LAIN 3010 or GREK 
2002 or permission of department 

Graduate prerequisite: Pass on Classics Department 

Greek or Latin proficienc) exam or permission of de- 
partment 

The positions of Greek and I atm within the Indo Eu 
ropean language family with special attention to the 



(irtiihitiw Srhnol /)< \< 'notion ot ( 'ourst s 183 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from 
Proto-Indo-European. 

(LING)ENGL 4170/6170. Second Language Acqui- 
sition. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4110/6110 
or permission of department. 

Linguistic theories of second language acquisition, 
with emphasis on the acquisition of English. Topics in- 
clude order of acquisition, sociocultural factors with 
linguistic bases, and neurolinguistic models. 

(LING)ENGL 4180/6180. ESL Error Analysis. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4110/6110 
or permission of department. 

Psycholinguistic theory applied to problems in second 
language learning, and the prediction of language be- 
havior through the use of contrastive analysis. 

LING 4210/6210. Introduction to Indo-European 

Studies. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 

(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 

The Indo-European language family: the various early 

Indo-European dialects, their grammatical structures, 

and the evolution of those structures from the proto- 

language. 

(LING)PHIL 4300/6300. Philosophy of Language. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Topics such as formal and ordinary languages, mean- 
ing, reference, truth, definition, analyticity, ambiguity, 
metaphor, symbolism, and the uses of language. 

(LING)GRMN 4460/6460. Structure of Modern 
German. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: GRMN 3001. 
Linguistic and sociolinguistic structures of modern 
German with relevant linguistic terminology. Empha- 
sis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Taught in 
English. 

(LING)CMSD 4500/6500. Study of Language De- 
velopment. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CMSD 4130/6130 or per- 
mission of department. 

Normal development of children's reception, integra- 
tion, and expression of linguistic information; cultural, 
gender, socioeconomic, cognitive, and prelinguistic 
influences on language development. 

( LING )PH I L 4510/6510. Deductive Systems. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 25(H). 
Symbolic-mathematical logic, examining the proposi- 
tional and predicate calculi, with emphasis on prob- 
lems in translation and formalization and topics in the 
philosophy of logic and mathematics. 

(LING)PHIL 4520/6520. Model Theory. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PUIL(LING) 4510/6510. 
Formal semantics lor sentential and first order predi- 
cate logic, including both soundness and completeness 



results for first-order logic. Additional topics may in- 
clude Goedel's incompleteness results, the Skolem- 
Lowenheim theorem, or possible world semantics for 
modal logics. 

LING(CLAS) 4610/6610. Sanskrit I. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The phonology, morphology, and syntax of the classi- 
cal Sanskrit language, emphasizing the position of 
Sanskrit within the Indo-European language family 
and its importance for Indo-European linguistics. 

LING(CLAS) 4620/6620. Sanskrit II. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING(CLAS) 4610/6610. 
Continued studies in both the synchronic and di- 
achronic grammar of classical Sanskrit. 

LING 4690/6690. Historical Linguistics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
Traditional methods of historical linguistics are re- 
viewed, with examples from several different lan- 
guage families. Various kinds of possible phonological 
and syntactic changes are investigated in relation to 
modern linguistic theory. 

LING 4710/6710. Languages in Contact. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The influence of languages on other languages spoken 
in the same or neighboring areas, including pidgins 
and Creoles, with consideration of relationships in 
phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and vo- 
cabulary. 

LING(CMLT) 4740/6740. Discourse Analysis. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or permission 
of department. 

An interdisciplinary study of language use, text analy- 
sis, and evaluation. The course will provide students 
with the ability to investigate and evaluate structural 
features of language and to identify the strategies used 
by different writers based on style and cultural back- 
grounds. 

LING(ANTH) 4860/6860. Sociolinguistics. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The study of language as a cultural and social phe- 
nomenon. Topics include language and meaning, lan- 
guage and world view, language and social behavior, 
and language and social issues. 

LING(CMLT) 4870/6870. Language, Gender, and 
Culture. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The role of language and culture in the formation of 
philosophical assumptions about gender differentia- 
tion in society. 



184 / The University of Georgia 



Linguistics 



LING 4900/6900. Topics in Indo-European Lin- 
guistics. 3-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
The synchronic and diachronic grammar of an older 
Indo-European language. Possible offerings include 
Avestan, Hittite, Lithuanian, Old Church, Slavic, and 
Old Irish or topics such as Indo-European phonology, 
morphology, or syntax. 

LING 4920/6920. Less-Taught Languages I. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permision of department. 
Study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and cul- 
ture of a less-taught language. Possible offerings 
include Finnish, Hungarian, and other non-Indo-Euro- 
pean languages. This course cannot be used in partial 
fulfillment of the foreign language requirement in the 
core curriculum. 

LING 4930/6930. Less-Taught Languages II. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: LING 2100 or ENGL 
(LING) 3030 or permission of department. 
Study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and cul- 
ture of a less-taught language. Possible offerings 
include Finnish, Hungarian, and other non-Indo-Euro- 
pean languages. This course cannot be used in partial 
fulfillment of the foreign language requirement in the 
core curriculum. 

(LING)(AFAM)ENGL 6040. Language Use in the 
African American Community. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
History and structure of the speech and language styles 
used in the African American community; examina- 
tion of linguistic and cultural issues that confront the 
majority of African Americans; the role of the vernac- 
ular language of African Americans in society. 

(LING)ENGL 6070. Middle English. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: ENGL(LING) 4000/6000 or ENGL 
(LING) 4060/6060 or permission of department. 
The English language of the Middle English period, 
including the development of the language from the 
end of the Old English period through the transition to 
Modern English. 

(LING)GRMN 6380. Contrastive Grammar: Ger- 
man-English. 3 hours. 

Identification and examination of the salient structural 
similarities and differences between German and Eng- 
lish. 

LING 6570. Applied Natural Language Processing. 

3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in CSCKLING) 8570. 
Computer processing of human languages, intended 
for linguists with a variable amount of previous com- 
puter experience. Emphasis is on use of existing soft- 
ware rather than programming. 



(LING)GRMN 6600. History of the German Lan- 
guage. 3 hours. 

The origins of modern standard German from the 
Indo-European parent language through proto-Ger- 
manic, Old and Middle High German, and the early 
modem period. 

(LING)FREN 6630. The French Sound System in a 
Social Context. 3 hours. 

French phonetics: the sounds of French as they relate 
to levels of language from the vernacular to literature. 
An examination of how sounds vary with relation to 
region and social class. Practice in class and in the lan- 
guage laboratory. Given in French. 

(LING)SPAN 6650. Spanish Phonetics and Phonol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 

The Spanish sound system using core concepts of lin- 
guistics in general and phonology in particular. 
Characterization and transcription of spoken Spanish. 
Analysis of important phenomena of language varia- 
tion in the Hispanic world, including national, geo- 
graphical, historical, and social dialects. Given in 
Spanish. 

(LING)FREN 6700. Applied French Linguistics. 

3 hours. 

Phonology of French as it determines the underlying 
forms of morphology with an application to the teach- 
ing of French to non-native speakers. Emphasis on the 
concepts of variation, acceptability, and cultural sensi- 
tivity. Given in French. 

(LING)SPAN 6750. Spanish Syntax and Morphol- 
ogy. 3 hours. 

Grammar and language usage in the study of the syn- 
tactic and morphological structures of Spanish. The 
syntax and morphology of the pronoun and verb sys- 
tems, agreement phenomena, gerunds, comparisons, 
and modal and aspectual distinctions. Written self-ex- 
pression on a variety of issues as practical application 
of grammatical structures discussed in class. Given in 
Spanish. 

(LING)FREN 6800. French Syntax and Meaning. 

3 hours. 

The syntax of modern French through readings in de- 
scriptive analysis and examples of literary texts to see 
how word order contributes to meaning. Particular em- 
phasis on levels of style and reflections of social clasv 
Frequent compositions required. Given in French 

(LING)GRMN 6810. German Phonolog> and Mor- 
phology. 3 hours 

Theoretical and applied German phonology and word 
structure. Taught in English. 

(LING)SPAN 6850. Spanish Applied Linguistics. 
3 hours. 

Phonetic and morpho-syntaclic structures that are 
problematic tor the English speaking student of Span- 
ish Wins in which culture is encoded in language. Im- 
plications of Spanish linguistics tor the teaching and 
learning of Spanish and the linguistic education of 
language teachers, ('men in Spanish. 



Graduate School Description ot ( ours* i 185 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



(LING)FREN 6910. History of the French Lan- 
guage in its Social and Literary Context. 3 hours. 
The major changes in the history of the French lan- 
guage, with special attention to the interaction of lin- 
guistic and societal changes and to the representation 
of these changes in literary texts. Given in French. 

(LING)SPAN 6950. Spanish Semantics and Prag- 
matics. 3 hours. 

Semantic and pragmatic approaches to the study of 
meaning in Spanish. Differences between sentence 
meaning and speaker meaning. Analysis of types of 
discourse in Spanish such as narrative and free con- 
versation. Given in Spanish. 

LING 7000. Master's Research. 3-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

LING 7300. Master's Thesis. 3-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

(LING)GRMN 7500. Problems and Methods of 
Teaching College German. 3 hours. 
Methods for teaching foreign language and develop- 
ment of language skills in German. For teaching assis- 
tants in German and graduate students in German and 
Language Education. Taught in English. 

(LING)FREN 7700. Teaching College French. 

3 hours. 

Principles and methods of second language teaching 
applied to French. An analysis of techniques used to 
teach listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture, 
with an examination of current theories of language 
acquisition. Given in French. 

(LING)SPAN 7750. Teaching College Spanish. 

3 hours. 

Foreign language teaching and learning applied to 
Spanish. Theories of second language acquisition. 
Techniques and strategies to teach listening, speaking, 
reading, writing, and culture in context. Activities and 
procedures of classroom instruction. Issues in the pro- 
fessionali/.ation of Spanish teachers. Given in Spanish. 

(LING)ROML 8000. Topics in Romance Lan- 
guages. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Specific aspects of Romance languages, linguistics, 
literatures, or cultures. 

(LING)SPAN 8010. Topics in Culture, Language, 
Linguistics, and Literature of the Spanish-Speak- 
ing World Seminar. 3 hours. Repeatable for maxi- 
mum 9 hours credit. 

An intensive, integrative, and eontextuali/ed study of 
a specific representative topic in language, literature, 



culture, and linguistics of the Spanish-speaking world. 
Given in Spanish. 

LING 8020. Language Variation. 3 hours. 
Regional and social language variation within one lan- 
guage, including the relationship between variation 
and language change. Historical and present-day illus- 
trations come primarily from English, with considera- 
tion of the significance of language variation in our 
modern social context. 

(LING)CMSD 8050. Seminar: Language Acquisi- 
tion and Disorders. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Recent issues and research in language acquisition and 
disorders. Major theories of development, assessment, 
and intervention, with emphasis on integration of the- 
ory and clinical practice. 

LING 8060. Phonetics and Phonology. 3 hours. 
Not open to students with credit in GRMN(LING) 
6810. 

Phonetic transcription of various languages dictated 
by native and non-native speakers; understanding of 
the phonemic principle by the solution of selected 
problems which consist of phonetically transcribed 
data. 

LING 8070. Advanced Generative Phonology. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: LING 8060 or permission of department. 
The formal nature of phonological rules and represen- 
tations and how they interact to delimit possible real 
language phonologies, with attention given to such 
phenomena as syllabification, tone, and vowel har- 
mony. 

LING 8080. Seminar in Linguistic Theory. 3 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Special topics and current issues in linguistic theory. 

LING 8120. Morphology. 3 hours. 

Grammatical analysis of phonemically transcribed 

data from numerous languages of the world. 

(LING)EPSY(PSYC) 8130. Psycholinguistics. 

3 hours. 

Recent theoretical and experimental work on the psy- 
chological aspects of semantics, grammar, and dis- 
course processes are surveyed. Language development 
is also considered. 

LING 8150. Generative Syntax. 3 hours 
Techniques and formalisms for analyzing syntactic 
phenomena of human languages within the framework 
of generative grammar. Examples will be drawn from 
English. 

LING 8160. Advanced Generative Syntax. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: LING 8150. 

Formal analysis of syntactic phenomena, such as the 
passive construction, question formation, and relative 
clauses, with examples drawn primarily from English. 



186 / The University of Georgia 



Linguistics 



LING 8250. Teaching College Second Language 
Courses. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 
credit. 

Not open to students with credit in FREN(LING) 7700 
or GRMN(LING) 7500 or SPAN(LING) 7750. 
The teaching of college second language courses, most 
often for new teaching assistants in less-common lan- 
guages. 

LING 8280. Seminar in Second Language Acquisi- 
tion. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Special topics and current issues in second language 
acquisition. Topics will vary; consult the Linguistics 
Program office for the specific topics to be covered in 
any offering of the seminar. 

(LING)PHIL 8300. Seminar in the Philosophy of 

Language. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

The original course materials dealing with such topics 

as formal and ordinary languages, meaning, reference, 

descriptions, truth, definition, analyticity, speech acts, 

and the uses of language. 

(LING)GRMN 8320. Gothic. 3 hours. 
Morphology, phonology, and history of the Gothic lan- 
guage based on extant texts. Emphasis on the develop- 
ment of earlier stages of the language and on its later 
language forms. Taught in English. 

(LING)CMSD 8360. Advanced Speech and Voice 

Science. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: [(CMSD(LING) 4140/6140 or CMSD 

4150/6150)] and CSCI 1 100-1 100L and permission of 

department. 

Designed for students at the early stages of thesis or 

dissertation planning. Specific topics vary depending 

on student/faculty interests. Lecture/discussion format 

to present research approaches to acoustic phonetics, 

voice science, and psychoacoustics. Emphasis on 

available instrumentation, measurement standards, 

psychophysics, and issues in signal processing of 

speech and voice. 

(LING)CMSD 8360L. Laboratory in Advanced 

Speech and Voice Science. 3 hours. Repeatable for 

maximum 9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: CMSD(LING) 8360 and permission of 

department. 

Hands-on laboratory exercises emphasizing digital 

recording techniques and signal conditioning; spectral. 

spectrographs, and aerodynamic measures ol Speech 

and voice; indirect measures of laryngeal vibration; 

computational models of peripheral auditory process 

ing. 

(LING)GRMN 8400. Middle High German. 

3 hours. 

Phonology and grammar of the language, with exten 
sive readings in the prose, epic, and lyric poetry of the 
Middle High German era. 



LING 8480. Seminar in Cognitive Linguistics. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Special topics and current issues in cognitive aspects 
of linguistics. 

(LING)GRMN 8510. Seminar in German Linguis- 
tics. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Intensive investigation of a subject or topic in German 
linguistics. Taught in English. 

(LING)GRMN 8520. Seminar in German Lan- 
guage Variation. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Intensive investigation of synchronic and diachronic 
variation in German. Taught in English. 

(LING)SPCM 8530. Language and Communica- 
tion Behavior. 3 hours. 

Surveys linguistic aspects of human interaction. Ex- 
amines language patterns such as orality, intensity, im- 
mediacy, and power. Analyzes conversational data as 
well as language structures in public messages. 

(LING)CSCI 8570. Natural Language Processing 
Techniques. 4 hours. 

Prerequisite: CSCI(ARTI) 4540/6540 and LING 8150. 
Human language from a computational point of view; 
algorithms and techniques for computer understanding 
of human-language input. 

LING 8680. Seminar in Historical Linguistics. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Special topics and current issues in historical linguis- 
tics. 

(LING)FREN 8800. Seminar in French Linguistics. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Topics and issues in French linguistics. Possible offer- 
ings include Old French, French dialectology, French 
sociolinguistics, and French semantics and pragmat- 
ics. Given in French. 

(LING)ANTH 8880. Field Methods in Linguistics. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of major. 

The techniques of recording and analyzing a foreign 

language by working directly with a native speaker. 

LING 8980. Seminar in Language Variation and 
Sociolinguistics. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Special topics and current issues in language variation 
and sociolinguistics 

LING 9000. Doctoral Research. 3-9 hours Repeat 

able for maximum 30 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Research while enrolled tor a doctoral degree under 

the direction of faculty members. 

LING 9010. Directed Readings in Linguistics. 

3 hours. Repeatable tor maximum 12 hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Advanced directed stud) of a topic in linguistics. 



Graduate School De» ription of ( ourst • 1S7 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



LING 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 3-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Marine Sciences 



Robert E. Hodson, Head 

Mary Ann Moran, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-7671 
(Marine Sciences Building) 

The Department of Marine Sciences supports 
MS and PhD programs. Courses of study are 
currently offered in the biological, chemical, and 
physical areas of marine science. Graduate stu- 
dents have access to the extensive field and lab- 
oratory facilities of the School of Marine 
Programs in Athens and at Sapelo Island, Skid- 
away Island, and Brunswick on the Georgia 
coast. 

MARS 4100/6100. Physical Processes of the Ocean. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PH YS 1 1 1 2- 1 1 1 2L. 
Oceanographic principles of the geological and physi- 
cal structure, composition, and processes of the ocean 
with emphasis on general oceanic circulation, water 
properties, waves and tides, coastal physical 
processes, turbulent mixing, sediment transport. 

MARS 4200/6200. Chemical and Biological 

Oceanography. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in MARS 4110/6110. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1108-1108L and 

CHEM 1211 and CHEM 2211. 

Chemical composition, dynamics, and processes of 

life in the oceans and the role the life of the oceans 

plays in global processes. 

MARS(FORS) 4380/6380-4380L/6380L. Marine 
Fisheries Biology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours 
lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: BIOL 1108-1108L and 
permission of department. 

Interaction of oceanographic processes with the life 
histories and productivity of marine fisheries species, 
and the human interactions with major marine fish- 
eries. 

MARS 4450/6450. Introduction to Marine Chem- 
istry. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in MARS 8020- 
8020L. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and CHEM 
1212L and PHYS 1 212-1 21 2L and MATH 2200 and 
MATH 2200L and MARS 4110/6110. 
Chemical properties of oceanic systems, oceanic acid 



base equilibrium, redox chemistry, nutrient cycling, 
and radioactive processes. 

MARS 4500/6500. Field Study in Oceanography 
and Marine Methods. 5 hours. 15 hours lecture and 
25 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Laboratory and fieldwork in chemical, biological, sed- 
imentological, and physical oceanographic processes 
and methods in southeast esturaine, coastal, and shelf 
environments. 

MARS 4510/6510. Field Study in Oceanography 
and Marine Methods: Independent Research. 

3-7 hours. Repeatable for maximum 7 hours credit. 
40 hours lab per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Independent field research on oceanographic pro- 
cesses. 

MARS(MIBO) 4620/6620-4620L/6620L. Microbial 
Ecology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Emphasizes the roles of microorganisms in ecosys- 
tems. Nutrient cycles, methods of microbial analysis, 
and the functional roles of microorganisms. 

MARS 4810/6810. Microbial Biogeochemistry. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [MIBO 3500 and BCMB 
(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100] or permission of department. 
The microbial processes which are or have been im- 
portant in modifying the earth's lithosphere, hydros- 
phere, and atmosphere. Microbially mediated 
precipitation and solubilization of minerals, cycling of 
dissolved and particulate organic matter in natural wa- 
ters, and the physiological ecology of microorganisms 
adapted to extreme environments. 

MARS 7000. Master's Research. 1-15 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MARS 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-15 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

MARS 8010. Biological Oceanographic Processes. 

3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Major biological processes in the water column and 
sediments of estuarine, coastal, and open sea environ- 
ments, with emphasis on interactions of biota with ma- 
rine chemical and physical processes. 

MARS 8020-8020L. Chemical Oceanography. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L and 



188 / The University of Georgia 



Marine Sciences • Mathematics 



PHYS 1112-1112L and MATH 2210 and MATH 
2210L. 
! The chemical forms, distributions, and reactivities of 
major and minor elements in seawater. The use of 
chemical tracers to investigate biological and physical 
processes in the ocean. 

, MARS 8030. General Physical Oceanography. 

3 hours. 

I Prerequisite: (MATH 2500 and PHYS 1 1 1 2- 1 1 1 2L) or 
permission of department. 

j Oceanic circulation and elementary dynamical princi- 
ples. Major topics include observed physical proper- 
ties of the world's oceans, geostrophy, and vorticity. 

MARS 8100. Estuarine and Coastal Physical 
Oceanography. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MARS 8030 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

The distribution of suspended and dissolved material 
in estuarine and coastal waters. Role of tidal currents, 
winds, and freshwater discharge. Physical processes 
leading to mixing in estuarine and shallow coastal 
water. Field and laboratory collection and analysis of 
estuarine data. 

MARS 8110. Marine Sediment Diagenesis. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: (MARS 8020-8020L and MATH 2500) 
or permission of department. 

Nature and properties of marine sediment pore waters 
and surface sediments. Chemical, physical, and bio- 
logical processes controlling sediment pore water 
chemistry and the alteration and recycling of recently 
deposited sedimentary materials. 

MARS 8120. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: (MARS 8030 and MATH 2700 and 
PHYS 1212-1212L) or permission of department. 
Fundamental geophysical fluid dynamics of small, 
medium, and large scale rotating stratified fields. 
Derivation of the navier-stokes equation, dimensional 
analyses, quasi-geostrophic approximation, potential 
vorticity principles, buoyancy-driven flows. 

MARS 8130. Seminar in Hydrobiology. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Weekly meetings for discussion of current research in 
marine and freshwater biology and related areas. 

MARS 8140. Organic Geochemistry. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2211 and CHEM 221 1L and 
GEOL 1260-1260L. 

The use of specific organic marker compounds as 
probes for biological and geochemical processes 
Early diagenesis of lipids and other biochemicals. 
Molecular markers for paleoeeanographie conditions. 
Preservation of organic matter and petroleum forma- 
tion. 

MARS 8150. Ocean Waves. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: (MARS 8030 and MATH 2700 and 
PHYS I212-1212L) or permission of department. 
Physics and mathematics of wave motions in the 
ocean. Kinetics of waves, phase and group velocities, 



frequency and wave number dispersion, instabilities, 
barotropic and baroclinic wave forcing, gravity waves, 
vorticity waves, internal waves, tides, kelvin waves, 
planetary rossby waves. Time series and spectral 
analysis as oceanographic experimental tools. 

MARS 8160. Marine Ecology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or permission 
of department. 

The ecology of organisms, populations, and communi- 
ties occurring in marine environments. 

MARS(ANTH) 8210. Topics in Coastal Marine Pol- 
icy. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: ECOL(BIOL) 3500-3500L or permission 
of department. 

Coastal marine policy approached from scientific, 
legal, and anthropological perspectives. This interdis- 
ciplinary course provides a general background in 
coastal policy, and uses a case study approach to ex- 
amine current topics in marine resource management. 
Topics include: coastal zone management, coastal 
groundwater supply, coastal fisheries, development in 
the coastal zone. 

MARS 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-15 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MARS 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Mathematics 



Kevin F. Clancey, Head 

Kenneth D. Johnson, Graduate Coordinator. 

542-2211 
(Boyd Graduate Studies Research Center) 

The Department of Mathematics offers graduate 
programs of study leading to the PhD (Doctor of 
Philosophy) degree, MA (Master o\' Arts) de- 
gree, and MAMS (Master of Applied Mathemat- 
ical Sciences) degree. The purpose o\' the PhD 
program is to develop students into research and 
teaching mathematicians. The MA program 
trains students tor careers outside the standard 
university environment The MAMS program is 
an interdepartmental program designed to train 

mathematically skilled students for careers in in- 
dustry, business, and government The depart- 
ment offers instruction and research training in 
the areas of algebra, analysis, applied mathemat- 

Graduau St h,> ( <i Dest riptioti afi ii L89 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



ics, (ordinary, partial, stochastic) differential 
equations, (algebraic, differential, and integral) 
geometry, mathematical physics, number theory, 
numerical analysis, probability and stochastic 
processes, and topology. Financial aid in the 
form of assistantships is available to students ad- 
mitted into the graduate program; this support 
will be continued as long as the student makes 
timely progress and maintains a satisfactory aca- 
demic record. Additionally, the department of- 
fers every year the Wills Memorial Scholarship, 
in the amount of $2500, to a student making out- 
standing progress towards his or her PhD. 

MATH 4000/6000. Modern Algebra and Geometry I. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: [(MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500) and MATH 3200] or permission of department. 
Abstract algebra, emphasizing geometric motivation 
and applications. Beginning with a careful study of in- 
tegers, modular arithmetic, and the Euclidean algo- 
rithm, the course moves on to fields, isometries of the 
complex plane, polynomials, splitting fields, rings, ho- 
momorphisms, field extensions, and compass and 
straightedge constructions. 

MATH 4010/6010. Modern Algebra and Geometry 

II. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4000/6000. 
More advanced abstract algebraic structures and con- 
cepts, such as groups, symmetry, group actions, count- 
ing principles, symmetry groups of the regular 
polyhedra, Burnside's Theorem, isometries of R A 3, 
Galois Theory, and affine and projective geometry. 

MATH 4050/6050. Advanced Linear Algebra. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4000/6000. 
Orthogonal and unitary groups, spectral theorem; infi- 
nite dimensional vector spaces; Jordan and rational 
canonical forms and applications. 

MATH 4080/6080. Advanced Algebra. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4010/6010 or per- 
mission of department. 

Linear algebra, groups, rings, and modules, intermedi- 
ate in level between Modern Algebra and Geometry II 
and Algebra. Topics include the finite-dimensional 
spectral theorem, group actions, classification of fi- 
nitely generated modules over principal ideal domains, 
and canonical forms of linear operators. 

MATH 4100/6100. Real Analysis. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 3 1(H) and MATH 
3200) or permission of department. 
Metric spaces and continuity; differentiable and inte- 
grate functions of one variable; sequences and series 
of functions. 

MATH 4110/6110. The Lebesgue Integral and Ap- 
plications. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4100/6100 or 
MATH 4200/6200 or permission of department. 



The Lebesgue integral with applications to Fourier 
analysis and probability. 

MATH 4120/6120. Multivariate Analysis. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 3510 or MATH 
4100/6100 or MATH 4200/6200. 
The derivative as a linear map, inverse and implicit 
function theorems, change of variables in multiple in- 
tegrals; manifolds, differential forms, and the general- 
ized Stokes' Theorem. 

MATH 4150/6150. Complex Variables. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 2500 and MATH 
3100) or MATH 3510. 

Differential and integral calculus of functions of a 
complex variable, with applications. Topics include 
the Cauchy integral formula, power series and Laurent 
series, and the residue theorem. 

MATH 4200/6200. Point Set Topology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 3100 and MATH 
3200. 

Topological spaces, continuity; connectedness, com- 
pactness; separation axioms and Tietze extension the- 
orem; function spaces. 

MATH 4220/6220. Differential Topology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4120/6120 and 
(MATH 4100/6100 or MATH 4200/6200). 
Manifolds in Euclidean space: fundamental ideas of 
transversality, homotopy, and intersection theory; dif- 
ferential forms, Stokes' Theorem, deRham cohomol- 
ogy, and degree theory. 

MATH 4250/6250. Differential Geometry. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 2500 and MATH 
3000) or MATH 3510. 

The geometry of curves and surfaces in Euclidean 
space: Frenet formulas for curves, notions of curvature 
for surfaces; Gauss-Bonnet Theorem; discussion of 
non-Euclidean geometries. 

MATH 4300/6300. Introduction to Algebraic 
Curves. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4000/6000 or per- 
mission of department. 

Polynomials and resultants, projective spaces. The 
focus is on plane algebraic curves: intersection, Be- 
zout's theorem, linear systems, rational curves, singu- 
larities, blowing up. 

MATH 4400/6400. Number Theory. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4000/6000. 
Euler's theorem, public key cryptology, pseudoprimes, 
multiplicative functions, primitive roots, quadratic 
reciprocity, continued fractions, sums of two squares 
and Gaussian integers. 

MATH 4450/6450. Cryptology and Computational 
Number Theory. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 4000/6000. 
Recognizing prime numbers, factoring composite 
numbers, finite fields, elliptic curves, discrete loga- 
rithms, private key cryptology, key exchange systems, 
signature authentication, public key cryptology. 



190 / The University of Georgia 



Mathematics 



MATH 4500/6500. Numerical Analysis I. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 
3100. 

Methods for finding approximate numerical solutions 
to a variety of mathematical problems, featuring care- 
ful error analysis. A mathematical software package 
will be used to implement iterative techniques for non- 
linear equations, polynomial interpolation, integration, 
and problems in linear algebra such as matrix inver- 
sion, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. 

MATH 4510/6510. Numerical Analysis II. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 2500 or MATH 
3510) and MATH 2700 and MATH 4500/6500. 
Numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential 
equations, higher-dimensional Newton's method, and 
splines. 

MATH 4600/6600. Probability. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 2500 and MATH 
3100) or MATH 3510. 

Discrete and continuous random variables, expecta- 
tion, independence and conditional probability; bino- 
mial, Bernoulli, normal, and Poisson distributions; law 
of large numbers and central limit theorem. 

MATH(CSCI) 4630/6630. Mathematical Analysis 
of Computer Algorithms. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 3000 and (MATH 
3200 or CSCI(MATH) 2610). 

Discrete algorithms (number-theoretic, graph-theo- 
retic, combinatorial, and algebraic) with an emphasis 
on techniques for their mathematical analysis. 

MATH(CSCI) 4670/6670. Combinatorics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500) and (MATH 3200 or CSCI(MATH) 2610). 
Basic counting principles: permutations, combina- 
tions, probability, occupancy problems, and binomial 
coefficients. More sophisticated methods include gen- 
erating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion/ex- 
clusion principle, and the pigeonhole principle. 
Additional topics include asymptotic enumeration, 
Polya counting theory, combinatorial designs, coding 
theory, and combinatorial optimization. 

MATH(CSCI) 4690/6690. Graph Theory. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500) and (MATH 3200 or CSCI(MATH) 2610). 
Elementary theory of graphs and digraphs. Topics in- 
clude connectivity, reconstruction, trees, Euler's prob- 
lem, hamiltonicity, network flows, planarity, node and 
edge colorings, tournaments, matchings, and extremal 
graphs. A number of algorithms and applications are 
included. 

MATH 4700/6700. Qualitative Ordinary Differen- 
tial Equations. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2700 and (MATH 
3000 or MATH 3500). 

Transform methods, linear and nonlinear systems of 
ordinary differential equations, stability, and chaos 



MATH 4710/6710. Mathematics of Finance. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2210 or MATH 
2310HorMATH2410H. 

The mathematical methods and models used in the 
fields of financial analysis and actuarial science. Cov- 
ers the theory of interest, models of financial markets 
including derivative markets, an introduction to risk 
and models and actuarial mathematics. 

MATH 4720/6720. Introduction to Partial Differen- 
tial Equations. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2700 and (MATH 
2500 or MATH 3510). 

The basic partial differential equations of mathemati- 
cal physics: Laplace's equation, the wave equation, 
and the heat equation. Separation of variables and 
Fourier series techniques are featured. 

MATH 4760/6760. Mathematics and Music. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2210 or MATH 
2310HorMATH2410H. 

This course is intended for undergraduates (math ma- 
jors, music majors, and others) interested in the math- 
ematical aspects of music. At least some familiarity 
with musical notation is a prerequisite. Topics to be 
discussed include the structure of sound, the construc- 
tion of scales, and synthesis. 

MATH 4780/6780. Mathematical Biology. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2210 or MATH 
2310HorMATH2410H. 

Mathematical models in the biological sciences: com- 
partmental flow models, dynamic system models, dis- 
crete and continuous models, deterministic and 
stochastic models. 

MATH 4850/6850. History of Mathematics. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Senior standing. 
The development of mathematical thought from an- 
cient times to the present, paying particular attention 
to the context of today's mathematics curriculum. 

MATH 4900/6900. Topics in Mathematics. 3 hours 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Senior standing. 
A special topic not otherwise offered in the mathemat- 
ics curriculum. 

MATH 5020/7020. Arithmetic for Middle School 
Teachers. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2200. 
Operations of arithmetic for middle school teachers; 
number systems, set theory to stud\ mappings, func- 
tions, and equivalence relations 

MATH 5030/7030. Geometry and Measurement for 
Middle School Teachers. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite MATH 2200. 

Principles of geometry and measurement for middle 

school teachers 



Graduate School De» ripti l*Jl 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



MATH 5070/7070. Calculus for Advanced Place- 
ment Teachers. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2500 or MATH 
3510. 

Variable calculus designed to prepare in-service sec- 
ondary school teachers for effective instruction of ad- 
vanced placement students. Emphasizes concepts and 
principles underlying differential and integral calculus 
of a single variable. 

MATH 5200/7200. Foundations of Geometry I. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (MATH 3000 or MATH 
3500) and MATH 3200. 

Advanced elementary geometry for prospective teach- 
ers of secondary school mathematics: axiom systems 
and models; the parallel postulate; neutral, Euclidean, 
and non-Euclidean geometries. 

MATH 5210/7210. Foundations of Geometry II. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 5200/7200. 
Further development of the axioms and models for Eu- 
clidean and non-Euclidean geometry; transformation 
geometry. 

MATH 5560/7560. Probability and Statistics for 
Teachers. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2200. 
Fundamental ideas of probability with particular em- 
phasis on their applications in statistics. 

MATH 6800. Directed Reading and/or Projects. 

1-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Directed reading and/or project at the master's level. 

MATH 7000. Master's Research. 1-6 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MATH 7040. Basic Ideas of Calculus I. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MATH 2210 or MATH 231 OH or MATH 

241 OH. 

Survey of one-variable calculus in preparation for 
teaching calculus at the secondary level: combines re- 
view of basic techniques with careful study of under- 
lying concepts 

MATH 7050. Basic Ideas of Calculus II. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MATH 2210 or MATH 231 OH or MATH 
24 1 OH. 

A continuation of Basic Ideas of Calculus I focusing 
on functions of several variables. 

MATH 7100. Technical Report. 3 hours 
For use with the Master's degree in Applied Mathe- 
matical Science - Mathematics option. 

MATH 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 

for maximum IX hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 



192 / The University oj Georgia 



MATH 8000. Algebra I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4010/6010 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Groups and rings, including Sylow theorems, classify- 
ing small groups, finitely generated abelian groups, 
Jordan-Holder theorem, solvable groups, simplicity of 
the alternating group, euclidean domains, principal 
ideal domains, unique factorization domains, noether- 
ian rings, Hilbert basis theorem, Zorn's lemma, and 
existence of maximal ideals and vector space bases. 

MATH 8010. Algebra II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8000. 

Modules and fields, including noetherian modules, fi- 
nitely generated modules over principal ideal domains, 
canonical forms of matrices, spectral theorems, tensor 
products, algebraic and transcendental field exten- 
sions, galois theory, solvability of polynomials, sym- 
metric functions, cyclotomic extensions, finite fields, 
solution formulas for polynomials of low degree. 

MATH 8020. Communative Algebra. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8000. 

Localization and completion, Nakayama's lemma, 
Dedekind domains, Hilbert's basis theorem, Hilbert's 
Nullstellensatz, Krull dimension, depth and Cohen- 
Macaulay rings, regular local rings. 

MATH 8030. Topics in Algebra. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8000 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Topics in abstract algebra at the level of current re- 
search. 

MATH 8040. Representation Theory of Finite 
Groups. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8010. 

Irreducible and indecomposable representations, 
Schur's lemma, Maschke's theorem, the Wedderburn 
structure theorem, characters and orthogonality rela- 
tions, induced representations and Frobenius reciproc- 
ity, central characters and central idempotents, 
Burnside's p A a q A b theorem, Frobenius normal p-com- 
plement theorem. 

MATH 8080. Lie Algebras. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8000. 

Nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras, structure and 
classification of semisimple Lie algebras, roots, 
weights, finite-dimensional representations. 

MATH 8100. Real Analysis I. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MATH 4100/6100 or permission of de- 
partment. 

Measure and integration theory with relevant exam- 
ples from Lebesgue integration, Hilbert spaces (only 
with regard to L A 2), L A p spaces and the related Riesz 
representation theorem. Hahn, Jordan and Lebesgue 
decomposition theorems, Radon-Nikodym Theorem 
and Fubini's Theorem. 

MATH 8110. Real Analysis II. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8100. 

Topics including: Haar Integral, change of variable 






Mathematics 



formula, Hahn-Banach theorem for Hilbert spaces, 
Banach spaces and Fourier theory (series, transform, 
Gelfand-Fourier homomorphism). 

MATH 8130. Topics in Analysis. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8100 or MATH 8150. 
Topics in analysis at the level of current research. 

MATH 8150. Complex Variables I. 3 hours. 
The Cauchy-Riemann Equations, linear fractional 
transformations and elementary conformal mappings, 
Cauchy's theorems and its consequences, including 
Morera's theorem, Taylor and Laurent expansions, 
maximum principle, residue theorem, argument prin- 
ciple, Rouche's theorem and Liouville's theorem. 

MATH 8160. Complex Variables II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8150. 

Topics including Riemann Mapping Theorem, elliptic 
functions, Mittag-Leffler and Weierstrass Theorems, 
analytic continuation and Riemann surfaces. 

MATH 8170. Functional Analysis I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8100. 

Hilbert spaces and Banach spaces, spectral theory, 
topological vector spaces, comvexity and its conse- 
quences, including the Krein-Milman theorem. 

MATH 8180. Functional Analysis II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8170 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

Operator theory, spectral theorem for normal opera- 
tors, distribution theory, the Schwartz spaces, topics 
from C*-algebras and von Neumann algebras. 

MATH 8190. Lie Groups. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MATH 8000 and MATH 8250. 
Classical groups, exponential map, Poincare-Birkhoff- 
Witt Theorem, homogeneous spaces, adjoint represen- 
tation, covering groups, compact groups, Peter- Weyl 
Theorem, Weyl character formula. 

MATH 8200. Algebraic Topology. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4200/6200. 
The fundamental group, van Kampen's theorem, and 
covering spaces. Introduction to homology: simplicial, 
singular, and cellular. Applications. 

MATH 8210. Topology of Manifolds. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MATH 8200. 

Poincare duality, deRham's theorem, topics from dif- 
ferential topology. 

MATH 8220. Homotopy Theory. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MATH 8200. 

Topics in homotopy theory, including homotopy 
groups, CW complexes, and fibrations. 

MATH 8230. Topics in Topology and Geometry. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum V hours credit 
Prerequisite: MATH 8200 or permission o\ depart- 
ment. 

Advanced topics in topology and/or differential geom- 
etry leading to and including research level material 



MATH 8250. Differential Geometry I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4200/6200. 
Differentiable manifolds, vector bundles, tensors, 
flows, and Frobenius' theorem. Introduction to Rie- 
mannian geometry. 

MATH 8260. Differential Geometry II. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8250. 

Riemannian geometry: connections, curvature, first 

and second variation; geometry of submanifolds. 

Gauss-Bonnet theorem. Additional topics, such as 

characteristic classes, complex manifolds, integral 

geometry. 

MATH 8300. Introduction to Algebraic Geometry. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8000. 

An invitation to algebraic through a study of exam- 
ples. Affine and projective varieties, regular and ratio- 
nal maps, Nullstellensatz. Veronese and Segre 
varieties, Grassmannians, algebraic groups, quadrics. 
Smoothness and tangent spaces, singularities and tan- 
gent cones. 

MATH 8310. Geometry of Schemes. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8020 and MATH 8300. 
The language of Grothendieck's theory of schemes. 
Topics include the spectrum of a ring, "gluing" spectra 
to form schemes, products, quasi-coherent sheaves of 
ideals, and the functor of points. 

MATH 8320. Algebraic Curves. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8300. 

The theory of curves, including linear series and the 
Riemann Roch theorem. Either the algebraic (variety), 
arithmetic (function field), or analytic (Riemann sur- 
face) aspect of the subject may be emphasized in dif- 
ferent years. 

MATH 8330. Topics in Algebraic Geometry. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8300. 

Advanced topics such as algebraic surfaces, or coho- 
mology and sheaves. 

MATH 8400. Algebraic/Analytic Number Theory I. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 4080/6080 or permission of de- 
partment. 

The core material of algebraic number theory: number 
fields, rings of integers, discriminants, ideal class 
groups, Dirichlet's unit theorem, splitting o\ prunes; p- 
adic fields. HenseTs lemma, adeles and ideles. the 
strong approximation theorem. 

MATH 8410. Algebraic/Analytic Number Theor\ II. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8400 or permission of depart- 
ment. 

A continuation of Algebraic and Analytic Number 
TheOf) I, introducing analytic methods: the Riemann 
/.eta function, its analytic continuation ami functional 

equation, the Prime number theorem; sic\es. the 



Graduate School Description <>/ ( tmm i 1*^3 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Bombieri-Vinogradov theorem, the Chebotarev den- 
sity theorem. 

MATH 8430. Topics in Arithmetic Geometry. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in Algebraic number theory and Arithmetic 
geometry, such as class field theory, Iwasawa theory, 
elliptic curves, complex multiplication, cohomology 
theories, Arakelov theory, diophantine geometry, auto- 
morphic forms, L-functions, representation theory. 

MATH 8440. Topics in Combinatorial/Analytic 

Number Theory. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 

1 8 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Topics in combinatorial and analytic number theory, 

such as sieve methods, probabilistic models of prime 

numbers, the distribution of arithmetic functions, the 

circle method, additive number theory, transcendence 

methods. 

MATH 8450. Topics in Algorithmic Number The- 
ory. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 1 8 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Topics in computational number theory and algebraic 
geometry, such as factoring and primality testing, 
cryptography and coding theory, algorithms in number 
theory and arithmetic geometry. 

MATH 8500. Advanced Numerical Analysis I. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 4510/6510. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 4100/6100. 

Numerical solution of nonlinear equations in one and 

several variables, numerical methods for constrained 

and unconstrained optimization, numerical solution of 

linear systems, numerical methods for computing 

eigenvalues and eigenvectors, numerical solution of 

linear least squares problems, computer applications 

for applied problems. 

MATH 8510. Advanced Numerical Analysis II. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8500. 

Polynomial and spline interpolation and approxima- 
tion theory, numerical integration methods, numerical 
solution of ordinary differential equations, computer 
applications for applied problems. 

MATH 8520. Advanced Numerical Analysis III. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8500. 

Finite difference and finite element methods lor ellip- 
tic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential eqtM 
tions, convergence and stability of those methods, 
numerical algorithms for the implementation of those 
methods. 

MATH 8550. Special Topics in Numerical Analysis. 

3 hours. Repeatable lor maximum 18 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8500. 

Special topics in numerical analysis, including itera- 
tive methods for large linear systems, computer aided 
geometric design, multivariate splines, numerical so 



lutions for pde's, numerical quadrature and cubature, 
numerical optimization, wavelet analysis for numeri- 
cal imaging. In any semester, one of the above topics 
will be covered. 

MATH 8600. Probability. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8100. 

Probability spaces, random variables, distributions, 
expectation and higher moments, conditional proba- 
bility and expectation, convergence of sequences and 
series of random variables, strong and weak laws of 
large numbers, characteristic functions, infinitely di- 
visible distributions, weak convergence of measures, 
central limit theorems. 

MATH 8620. Stochastic Processes. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8100. 

Conditional expectation, Markov processes, martin- 
gales and convergence theorems, stationary processes, 
introduction to stochastic integration. 

MATH 8630. Stochastic Analysis. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 8100. 

Conditional expectation, Brownian motion, semi- 
martingales, stochastic calculus, stochastic differential 
equations, stochastic control, stochastic filtering. 

MATH 8700. Applied Mathematics: Applications in 
Industry. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 15 hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: MATH 4720/6720. 
Mathematical modeling of some real-world industrial 
problems. Topics will be selected from a list which in- 
cludes air quality modeling, crystal precipitation, elec- 
tron beam lithography, image processing, 
photographic film development, production planning 
in manufacturing, and optimal control of chemical re- 
actions. 

MATH 8710. Applied Mathematics: Variational 
Methods/Perturbation Theory. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4100/6100. 
Calculus of variations, Euler-Lagrange equations, 
Hamilton's principle, approximate methods, eigen- 
value problems, asymptotic expansions, method of 
steepest descent, method of stationary phase, perturba- 
tion of eigenvalues, nonlinear eigenvalue problems, 
oscillations and periodic solutions, Hopf bifurcation, 
singular perturbation theory, applications. 

MATH 8740. Ordinary Differential Equations. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 4100/6100. 
Solutions of initial value problems: existence, unique- 
ness, and dependence on parameters, differential 
inequalities, maximal and minimal solutions, continu- 
ation of solutions, linear systems, self-adjoint eigen- 
value problems, Floquet Theory. 

MATH 8750. Introduction to Dynamical Systems. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 8740. 

Continuous dynamical systems, trajectories, periodic 

orbits, invariant sets, structure of alpha and omega 

limit sets, applications to two-dimensional au- 



194 / The University of Georgia 



Microbiology 



tonomous systems of ODE's, Poincare-Bendixson 
Theorem, discrete dynamical systems, infinite dimen- 
sional spaces, semi-dynamical systems, functional dif- 
ferential equations. 

MATH 8770. Partial Differential Equations. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4100/6100. 
Classification of second order linear partial differential 
equations, modern treatment of characteristics, func- 
tion spaces, Sobolev spaces, Fourier transform of gen- 
eralized functions, generalized and classical solutions, 
initial and boundary value problems, eigenvalue prob- 
lems. 

MATH 8800. Directed Reading and/or Projects. 

1-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Directed reading and/or project at the doctoral level. 

MATH 8900. Seminar in Algebra. 1-3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A study of some phase of current research in algebra. 

MATH 8910. Seminar in Analysis. 1-3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A study of some phase of current research in analysis. 

MATH 8920. Seminar in Topology. 1-3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A study of some phase of current research in topology. 

MATH 8930. Seminar in Algebraic Geometry. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

A study of some phase of current research in algebraic 

geometry. 

MATH 8940. Seminar in Number Theory. 1 -3 hours. 

Repeatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

A study of some phase of current research in number 

theory. 

MATH 8950. Seminar in Numerical Analysis. 

1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
A study of some phase of current research in numeri- 
cal analysis. 

MATH 8960. Seminar in Probability. 1-3 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission ot department. 
A study of some phase of current research in probabil- 
ity. 

MATH 8970. Seminar in Applied Mathematics. 
1-3 hours. Repeatable tor maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 

A stud) ot some phase ol current research in applied 
mathematics. 

MATH 8980. Seminar in Geometry. 1-3 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission ot department 



A study of some phase of current research in geome- 
try. 

MATH 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 36 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MATH 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1 9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 40 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Microbiology 



Lawrence J. Shimkets, Head 

Juergen K. W. Wiegel, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2651 
(Biological Sciences Building) 

Programs of study leading to both MS and PhD 
degrees are offered in different fields of micro- 
biology including microbial genetics, microbial 
ecology, microbial pathogenesis, cell biology, 
microbial physiology, anaerobic microbiology, 
and biotechnology. The department occupies 
over 34,000 square feet of recently renovated 
space, with laboratories equipped for elec- 
trophoretic analyses, gas-liquid chromatogra- 
phy, high-performance liquid chromatography, 
tissue culture, radioisotopic studies, light spec- 
troscopy, fluorimetry, cell fractionation, ultra- 
centrifugation, fermentation and computerized 
molecular sequence/structure analyses. In addi- 
tion, on-campus facilities available to faculty 
and students include an electron microscopy 
center, a large-scale fermentation laboratory, a 
cell analysis facility for flow cytometry, and a 
molecular genetics instrumentation laboratory 
offering automated protein and DNA sequenc- 
ing, amino acid analysis, oligonucleotide syn- 
thesis and peptide synthesis services. The 
Georgia Marine Institute on Sapelo Island, the 
Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, and the 
Savannah River Ecolog) Laboratory are avail- 
able for environmental studies in connection 

with a facult) member from this department. 

Prospective students should have credit for 
courses in either calculus ot statistics, general 

genetics, biochemistry, and a year each of inor- 
ganic and organic chemistry, with labs. Appli- 
cants with otherwise acceptable qualifications 
may enroll in those courses the) lack after ad- 



Graduat tscription of G irsa 195 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



mission to our program. No foreign language is 
required for the master's or doctoral degrees. 
For teaching assistants, the Test of Spoken En- 
glish (TSE) is required of all foreign applicants 
whose native language is not English. 

Prospective students should address inquiries 
to the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Mi- 
crobiology. Graduate students are normally ad- 
mitted at the beginning of fall semester, but in 
special circumstances a student may be admitted 
at the beginning of any semester. Students 
whose applications are complete by February 1 
will be considered for financial assistance, 
which usually begins in the fall semester. In ad- 
dition to several attractive fellowships, assistant- 
ships are available for teaching and research. A 
typical twelve-month stipend is about $15,500, 
but depends on the degree objective and level of 
experience. All students supported by assistant- 
ships receive a waiver of the tuition, except the 
activity fee and health insurance. 

Faculty members are associated with six in- 
terdepartmental programs including cell and de- 
velopmental biology, ecology, genetics, 
metalloenzymes, microbial diversity, and para- 
sitology. Graduate course offerings in these in- 
terdepartmental programs are available to 
microbiology students and serve to complement 
the graduate course offerings in microbiology. 
The listings in biochemistry and molecular biol- 
ogy, biology, botany, chemistry, cellular biology, 
ecology, genetics, marine sciences, and medical 
microbiology should be consulted to determine 
the range of courses available to microbiology 
majors. 

Additional information is also available at our 
website: http://www.uga.edu/mib. 

MIBO 4010/6010. Critical Review of Research in 
Microbiology. 2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 
hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500 and permis- 
sion of department. 

Undergraduate corequisite: MIBO 4900L or MIBO 
4960H or MIBO 4970H or MIBO 4980H or MIBO 
4990H. 

Critical analysis and discussion of recent advances in 
microbiology research through oral presentation. 
Specific topics may vary but will emphasize molecu- 
lar biology, physiology, and ecology of prokaryotes. 

(MIBO)FDST 4030/6030-4030L/6030L. Food Mi- 
crobiology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Interactions of microorganisms with food and the im- 
plications of these interactions for food preservation, 
safety, and fermentations. Pathogenic microorganisms 



1% / The University of Georgia 



associated with food. Analysis of foods for the pres- 
ence of microorganisms. 

MIBO 4090/6090. Prokaryotic Biology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: GENE 
(BIOL) 3200. 

Ultrastructure, physiology, genetics, ecology, and phy- 
logeny of bacteria and archaea. 

(MIBO)CBIO 4100/6100. Immunology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 
3100 and GENE(BIOL) 3200. 
Immunology from an experimental perspective. 
Anatomy, development, and function of the immune 
system. Immune system in infectious diseases. Mech- 
anisms and pathogenesis of immunological disorders. 
Evolution of immunological concepts. 

(MIBO)FDST 4120/6120-4120L/6120L. Food Fer- 
mentations. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Microbial and technical aspects of dairy, vegetable, 
meat, grain, and fruit fermentations. Products studied 
include cheese, sausage, beer, wine, and soy sauce. 

MIBO 4220/6220. Pathogenic Bacteriology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Molecular basis of bacterial virulence: identification 
of virulence factors, genetic regulation of virulence, 
and the complex interactions between bacterial 
pathogens and their hosts. 

MIBO 4300/6300. Environmental Microbiology 
and Biotechnology. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Microorganisms used in biotechnology, agriculture, 
bioremediation, and industry; distribution, taxonomy, 
and physiology of environmentally significant mi- 
croorganisms. 

(MIBO)(EHSC)FDST 4310/6310-4310L/6310L. 
Environmental Microbiology. 3 hours. 2 hours lec- 
ture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Types of microorganisms in the environment; effect of 
environmental conditions on microbial existence; pub- 
lic health aspects of environmental microbiology; ap- 
plications of microorganisms to solve environmental 
problems. 

(MIBO)(EHSC)FDST 4320/6320-4320L/6320L. 
Microbiology of Food Sanitation. 3 hours. 2 hours 
lecture and 3 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500. 
Microorganisms and practices important in food in- 
dustry sanitation and safety; microorganisms involved 
and control measures taken to prevent food borne ill- 
ness, with emphasis on food process operations. 

MIBO 4400L/6400L. Experimental Pathogenic 
Bacteriology. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab 
per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: GENE(BIOL) 3200. 



Microbiology 



Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: MIBO 

4220/6220. 

Bacterial virulence factors and dynamic interactions 

between bacteria and their hosts. 

MIBO 4600L/6600L. Microbial Physiology Labo- 
ratory. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MIBO 3500 and MIBO 
35 10L) or permission of department. 
Experimental design, execution, and interpretation as 
applied to microbial growth, metabolism, and diver- 
sity. 

(MIBO)CRSS 4610/6610-4610L/6610L. Soil Micro- 
biology. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Microorganisms in soil and their effect on nutrient re- 
cycling, especially as it relates to environmental qual- 
ity and crop production. 

(MIBO)MARS 4620/6620-4620L/6620L. Microbial 
Ecology. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500 or permis- 
sion of department. 

Emphasizes the roles of microorganisms in ecosys- 
tems. Nutrient cycles, methods of microbial analysis, 
and the functional roles of microorganisms. 

MIBO 4700/6700-4700L/6700L. Medical Mycology. 

4 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MIBO 3500 and MIBO 
3510L. 

Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
The yeasts, molds, and actinomycetes most likely to be 
encountered by a medical mycologist in a diagnostic 
laboratory, with special emphasis on the organisms 
which are pathogenic for man and other animals. 

MIBO 4800L/6800L. Microbial Genetics Labora- 
tory. 3 hours. 6 hours lab per week. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MIBO 3510Land GENE 
(BIOL) 3200) or permission of department. 
Genetic analysis of bacteria, with emphasis on isolat- 
ing mutants and mapping, characterizing, and cloning 
genes. 

(MIBO)ENTO 6670-6670L. Insect Pathogens. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L. 
Insect pathology, including history, classification of 
diseases, insect response to pathogens, normal in- 
sect/microbe ecology, and the production and use of 
insect pathogens lor pest control. 

MIBO 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat 

able for maximum 45 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 

the direction ol Faculty members. 

MIBO 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatahle 
for maximum 9 hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 



Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

MIBO 7500. Introductory Microbiology for Teach- 
ers. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in MIBO 3500. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L and CHEM 221 1 and 
CHEM 221 1L and BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100. 
Microorganisms, with special emphasis on bacteria, 
their structure, function, diversity, and importance to 
man. Specifically for students who plan to teach in 
some area of microbiology. 

MIBO 7510L. Introductory Microbiology Labora- 
tory for Teachers. 3 hours. 1 hour lecture and 4 hours 
lab per week. 

Not open to students with credit in MIBO 3510L. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108-1 108L and CHEM 2211 and 
CHEM2211L. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MIBO 7500 and BCMB 
(BIOL)(CHEM)3100. 

The primary scientific reasoning and laboratory 
methodology used in microbiology with an emphasis 
for students who plan to teach in some area of micro- 
biology. 

MIBO 8100L. Computational Methods in Biology. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Scientific reasoning and computer methodological 
skills used in genetic, biochemical, physiological, and 
ecological research. 

MIBO 8150. Seminar in Diversity of Microbial Re- 
search. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours 
credit. 1 hour lecture and 1 hour lab per week. 
Physiology, ecology, phylogeny, and genetics of vari- 
ous bacterial groups, including studies on adaption to 
high or low temperatures, methanogens, human and 
plant pathogens, bioremediation, mercury metabolism, 
nitrogen fixation, heme biosynthesis, protein folding, 
gene expression, and cell-cell interactions. Emphasis 
will be placed on methods used to research these prob- 
lems. 

MIBO 8160. Seminar in Microbiology. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: MIBO 8610. 

Techniques involved in effective seminar presentation, 
including preparation of visual aids, logical develop- 
ment of topic, and delivery. Students present a practice 
session to the class on an advanced microbiolog\ topic 
which is \ideotaped and critiqued, as well as a formal 
seminar to the department. 

MIBO 8170. Seminar in Prokaryotic Diversity. 

2 hours Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Research literature on the (tiversit) of bacteria and ar- 
ehaea. including physiology, genetics, ecology, and 
taxonomy. 

(MIBO)MMIB 8200. Pathogenic and Molecular 

Microbiology. 5 hours 

Prerequisite: MMIB 4220/6220 and BCMB 4020/ 

0020. 

Medical pathogens emphasizing molecular tech 

niques 



Graduate School Description oj Course: 197 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



(MffiO)MMIB 8230. Special Topics in Microbial 
Pathogenesis. 2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 4 
hours credit. 

Presentation and discussion of published research and 
new developments in microbial pathogenesis. 

(MIBO)(BCMB)CBIO 8520. Topics in Biochem- 
istry and Molecular Genetics of Parasites. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 1 hour lecture 
and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BCMB 8020 and GENE 8930. 
Parasite cellular biochemistry and molecular genetics 
with potential for rational drug design. Topics include 
DNA replication, RNA editing, nucleic acid salvage 
pathways, polyamine metabolism, and glycosylphos- 
phatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. 

MEBO 8600. Fundamental Processes of Prokary- 
otic Cell Biology. 3 hours. 

Biosynthesis of metabolic building blocks (amino 
acids, nucleotides, fatty acids) and macromolecules 
(DNA, RNA, proteins, and cell surface structures), en- 
vironmental regulation, and coordination of these 
processes with transport and cell division as they occur 
in key model prokaryotes. 

MIBO 8610. Prokaryotic Physiology and Diversity. 

3 hours. 

Physiological aspects of prokaryotic diversity. Prin- 
ciples of bioenergetics; fermentation pathways, 
including TCA cycle, glycolysis, substrate level phos- 
phorylation, and ion pumps; aerobic and anaerobic 
respiration; photosynthesis, autotrophy; and aerobic 
and anaerobic xenobiotic degradation. 

MIBO 8700. Special Topics in Microbiology. 

2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Microbial ecology, diversity, physiology, molecular 
genetics, biochemistry, or pathogenesis. Specific topic 
depends on instructor. 

MIBO 8900. Research Techniques in Microbiology. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research techniques in microbiology for graduate stu- 
dents in preparation for their thesis/dissertation pro- 
jects. 

MIBO 9000. Doctoral Research. 19 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MIBO 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours Re 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Music 



Richard M. Graham, Head 

Donald R. Lowe, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2743 
(Music Building) 

The Master of Music degree is offered in com- 
position, music literature, or performance. Stu- 
dents concentrating in musicology should enroll 
for the Master of Arts degree. Students desiring 
fifth-year certification as teachers of music in 
the public schools should enroll for the Master 
of Music Education degree offered in coopera- 
tion with the College of Education. The MMEd 
degree also offers a concentration in music ther- 
apy for students wishing to qualify as registered 
music therapists. 

Students desiring sixth-year certification as 
teachers of music in the public schools should 
enroll for the Specialist in Education program 
(sixth-year program) offered in cooperation with 
the College of Education. The Doctor of Educa- 
tion degree with subject matter concentration in 
music is offered in cooperation with the College 
of Education. 

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is offered 
in performance, composition, conducting, or 
music education. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in 
music to provide students with opportunities to 
pursue the research and academic aspects of the 
discipline at the highest scholarly level. 

Some music education courses are listed as 
EMUS courses in the College of Education sec- 
tion of this bulletin. 

MUSI 4100/6100. Tonal Theory and Analysis. 2 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MUSI 2120 and MUSI 
2130) or MUSI 4050. 
Chromatic harmonic analysis and analytical methods. 

MUSI 4110/6110. Introduction to Counterpoint. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (MUSI 2120 and MUSI 
2130) or MUSI 4050. 

Analysis and composition using sixteenth and eigh- 
teenth-century compositional techniques. 

MUSI 4120/6120. Form and Analysis. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MUSI 2120 and MUSI 
2 130) or MUSI 4050. 

Analysis of form focusing on music from the seven- 
teenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 



198 / The University of Georgia 



Music 



MUSI 4130/6130. Electronic Music Composition I. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (MUSI 2120 and MUSI 

2130) or MUSI 4050. 

Electronic music techniques, focusing on classical and 

MIDI applications. 

MUSI 4200/6200. Ancient, Medieval, and Renais- 
sance Music. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 
3220. 
Music from Greek and Roman society to ca. 1600. 

MUSI 4210/6210. Music in the Baroque Period. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 

3220. 

Musical styles and forms from Monteverdi through 

Bach and Handel. 

MUSI 4220/6220. Music in the Classic Period. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 

3220. 

Chamber, orchestral, keyboard, and operatic works 

from the middle and late eighteenth century. 

MUSI 4230/6230. Music in the Romantic Period. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 

3220. 

Emphasis on the development of song, symphony, 

chamber music, and opera. 

MUSI 4240/6240. Modern Music. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 

3220. 

Modern trends in music from Schoenberg, Stravinsky, 

Hindemith, and Bartok to the present. 

MUSI 4250/6250. Women and Music. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: (MUSI 3210 and MUSI 
3220) or permission of department. 
Roles of women in music, including the history of 
women musicians in western art music, world cul- 
tures, and popular music; gender studies in music. 

MUSI 4260/6260. Opera Literature. 2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 

3220. 

Representative operas from the Baroque era to the 

twentieth century. 

MUSI 4270/6270. Non- Western Music. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3210 and MUSI 

3220. 

Music of non-European cultures, including those of 

the Far East, Near East, and Africa. 

MUSI 4280/6280. Instrumental/Vocal/Choral Lit- 
erature. 2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (MUSI 3210 and MUSI 
3220) or permission of department. 
Solo, sonata, and ensemble musk composed for 
winds, brass, strings, piano and harpsichord, organ or 



voice, dating from the earliest appropriate period to 
the present. 

MUSI 4730/6730. African American Choral En- 
semble. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 4 hours 
credit. 

Performance of traditional and contemporary black 
gospel, spiritual, and popular music. 

MUSI 4740/6740. University Symphony Orchestra. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Performance of orchestral literature of various styles 
and genres. 

MUSI 4750/6750. University Chorus. 1 hour. Re- 
peatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Performance of choral literature for mixed voices from 
all periods of music history, including sacred, secular, 
folk, and popular music. 

MUSI 4760/6760. Concert Choir. 1 hour. Repeatable 
for maximum 8 hours credit. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Performance of choral literature for mixed voices from 
all periods of music history, including sacred, secular, 
folk, and popular music. 

MUSI 4780/6780. Jazz Bands. 1 hour. Repeatable for 
maximum 8 hours credit. 

Performance of works in a variety of jazz idioms and 
styles with emphasis on big band jazz. 

MUSI 4790/6790. Chamber Music Ensemble. 1 hour 
Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Chamber music experiences in variable instrumental 
categories (percussion, clarinet, trombone, etc.) 

MUSI 4792L/6792L. Jazz Improvisation. 1-2 hours 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 1-2 hours lab 
per week. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 1120 and MUSI 
1130. 

Graduate prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: Permission 
of department. 

The study and performance of jazz improvisation 
styles from the 1930*8 to the present through listening, 
analysis, practical application (applied studs), and per- 
formance. 

MUSI 4800/6800. Contemporar> Chamber Ensem- 
ble. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum X hours credit 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Perfor m ance of modern literature for small and large 
ensembles. 

Ml SI 4830/6830. Collegium Musieum. I hour Re 
pcatable lor maximum 8 hours credit 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 



Graduate \< h<»>! Dest ription of Counts 1*W 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Performance of early music through the Baroque. 

MUSI 4840/6840. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. 

1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

Performance of wind chamber compositions with con- 
centration on advanced scores. 

MUSI 4850/6850. Opera Ensemble. 1 hour. Repeat- 
able for maximum 4 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 
Performance of operatic literature. 

MUSI 5110/7110. Music for Childhood. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3110 and MUSI 
3120. 

Literature, techniques, and methodologies for teaching 
children music in a diverse society; a study of chil- 
dren's musical development. 

MUSI 5120/7120. Teaching Music for Early Child- 
hood Teachers. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3050. 
Music teaching techniques, methods, and materials for 
the early childhood teacher. For education majors only. 

MUSI 5130/7130. Early Childhood Musical Devel- 
opment. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3110 and MUSI 
3120. 

Musical development of children from birth through 
age eight years emphasizing auditory perception, audi- 
tory discrimination, responses of children to music, 
modes of learning music, and children's acquisition of 
musical performance skills, and understandings. 

MUSI 5140/7140. Computer- Assisted Instruction 

in Music. 2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 2120 and MUSI 

2130. 

Programming and testing CAI music lessons. 

MUSI 5260/7260. Marching Band Techniques. 

2 hours. 

Methods and techniques for organizing and training 
marching bands; planning music, drills, formations, 
and shows. 

MUSI 5270/7270. Advanced Conducting. 2 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3490 or MUSI 
3500 or MUSI 3510. 

Choral and instrumental conducting methods and tech- 
niques with application in laboratory situations. 

MUSI 5280/7280. Instrumental Techniques. 1 hour. 

Repeatable lor maximum 4 hours credit. 
P erfo rmance techniques and teaching methods for 
wind, string, and percussion instruments. 

Ml SI 5290/7290. Jazz Piano Improvisation Class. 

2 hours. 

Skills and techniques in keyboard jazz playing based 
upon a knowledge of modern popular harmonic and 
notational practices. 



MUSI 5340/7340. Choral Literature and Perfor- 
mance Practice. 2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3130 and MUSI 
3140. 

Choral music, including multicultural materials, suit- 
able for all levels and voices. 

MUSI 5350/7350. Instrumental Literature and Per- 
formance Practice. 2 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 3150 and MUSI 
3160. 

Instrumental music, including multicultural materials, 
suitable for all levels of instruction for band, orchestra, 
and chamber music. 

MUSI 5400/7400. Principles of Music Therapy. 

3 hours. 

Music as human behavior and its uses as therapeutic 

intervention with various populations. 

MUSI 5410/7410. Psychology of Music. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 5400/7400. 
Acoustical and psychological aspects of music with 
emphasis upon problems of perception, experimental 
aesthetics, musical function, measurement and diagno- 
sis of musical ability. 

MUSI 5420/7420. Influence of Music on Behavior. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 5410/7410. 
Physiological effects of music, the relation of music to 
health, and the place of music in the habilitative and 
rehabilitative process. 

MUSI 5430/7430. Clinical Experience. 2 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 5400/7400 or 
MUSI 5420/7420 or MUSI 5440/7440. 
Practical application of music therapy in an assigned 
clinic, along with seminars to analyze effectiveness, 
in-depth interactions, intervention strategies, and ac- 
countability measures. 

MUSI 5440/7440. Music in Recreation. 2 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 2120 or MUSI 
2130 or MUSI 2530 or MUSI 3480. 
Methods of song leading and accompanying on the au- 
toharp, guitar, and piano. 

MUSI 5450/7450. Music for Exceptional Children. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Junior standing and per- 
mission of department. 

Trends in special education, characteristics and needs 
of those classified as exceptional, curriculum develop- 
ment, and intervention strategies. Mainsireamed and 
self-contained settings will be discussed. 

MUSI 5730/7730. Electronic Music Composition II. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MUSI 4130/6130. 
Electronic music compositional techniques, focusing 
on digital sound recording, sampling, and editing. Stu- 
dents will use highly advanced recording and editing 
software on a high-speed computer. 



200 / The University of Georgia 



Music 



MUSI 6000. Directed Independent Study. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Independent research topics directed by a faculty 
member at the masters level. 

MUSI 6010. Trends and Issues in Music Education. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Current trends and issues in music education, the his- 
torical and social foundations of American music edu- 
cation, music education bibliography, and the role of 
research in music education. 

MUSI 6140. Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MUSI 4110/6110. 
Eighteenth-century counterpoint focusing on inven- 
tion, canon, and fugue in the works of J.S. Bach. 

MUSI 6290. Music History Problems. 3 hours. 
Western music literature, styles, genres, and com- 
posers from the Medieval period to the present day. 

MUSI 6300. Music Bibliography. 3 hours. 
Library research, documentation, and writing. 

MUSI 7000. Master's Research. 1-3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MUSI 7030. Research in Music Education. 3 hours. 
Basic concepts, types, and techniques of research as 
they apply to music education. Students plan and con- 
duct individual research projects. 

MUSI 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

MUSI 7320. Problems in Instrumental Music Edu- 
cation. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MUSI 3120 and MUSI 3150. 
Methods and techniques used for development of the 
instrumental music program, elementary through sec- 
ondary school; diagnosis of problems relating to 
strings, woodwinds, brasses, and percussion. 

MUSI 7330. Music Curriculum and Supervision. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Philosophy, design, implementation, and supervision 

of curriculum for music programs in the public 

schools. 

MUSI 7500. Vocal Pedagogy. 2 hours 
Vocal pedagogy in performance and in music educa- 
tion. 

MUSI 7520. Piano Pedagogy I. 2 hours 

Learning theories, methodologies, and materials. 



MUSI 7530. Piano Pedagogy II. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 7520 or permission of department. 
Repertoire, motivation, and related issues of personal- 
ities/learning styles. 

MUSI 7810. Applied Music Instruction. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 42 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Applied lessons at the masters level. Non-traditional 
format: One-hour weekly lessons in a major or sec- 
ondary applied instrument, voice, or composition for 
two and three credit hour students; thirty minute 
lessons for one credit hour students. Credit hours vary 
according to degree program and reflect differing per- 
formance expectations and literature difficulty. 

MUSI 7910. Masters Recital. 1-3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Solo or chamber recital in partial fulfillment of re- 
quirements for masters degrees. Non-traditional for- 
mat: Recital. 

MUSI 7920. Conducting Project. 1-3 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Preparation and presentation of masters conducting 
recital. Non-traditional format: Credit varies according 
to difficulty of literature and level of length of pro- 
gram. 

MUSI 8000. Practicum in Music Education. 

1-10 hours. Repeatable for maximum 10 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Supervised professional work experience with an edu- 
cational institution, musical organization, or arts 
agency. 

MUSI 8010. Directed Independent Study. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 24 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Independent research topics directed by a faculty 
member at the doctoral level. 

MUSI 8030. Research in Music Education. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 7030 or permission of department. 
Students plan and conduct group and individual pro- 
jects. 

MUSI 8040. Score Analysis I. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Score preparation and study with emphasis on the con- 
ductor's point of view. Literature will be chosen from 
Medieval through Baroque periods 

MUSI 8050. Score Analysis II. 3 hours 
Prerequisite: ML'SI X040 or permission of department. 
Score preparation and stud\ with emphasis on the con- 
ductor's point of View. Literature will be chosen from 
the Classic period to the present 

MUSI 8060. Music in Higher Kducation. 2 hours 
HistofA and development ot music in higher education 
in the United States and the mission, function, and op- 



(imJuuif Schoot Description of Courses /201 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



eration of music units within a college or university 
setting. 

MUSI 8070. Music Education Problems. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 7330 or permission of department. 
Basic principles and current thought in music educa- 
tion. 

MUSI 8080. Pedagogy of Music. 3 hours. 
Principles and practices of music instruction, includ- 
ing learning theory, curriculum design, and systems of 
evaluation. 

MUSI 8090. Psychology of Music. 3 hours. 
Experimental findings and research methods in psy- 
chology of music. 

MUSI 8100. History of Music Theory. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 4050. 

Issues in music theory from Pythagorus to the present, 
with emphasis on Medieval and Renaissance theorists. 

MUSI 8110. Contemporary Trends in Music The- 
ory I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 4050. 

Chromatic tonal theory and analysis. Late and post-ro- 
mantic composers (Wagner, Mahler, Strauss, and 
Schoenberg) involving current applications of typical 
harmonic and Schenkerian graphic analysis. 

MUSI 8120. Contemporary Trends in Music The- 
ory II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 4050. 

Analytical methods and models for modern and con- 
temporary music. The primary foci for the course will 
be pitch-class set analysis, twelve-tone theory, and 
more recent theories. 

MUSI 8130. Special Topics in Music Theory. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: MUSI 4050. 

Changing series of topics, including pedagogy of 
music theory. 

MUSI 8300. Special Studies in Keyboard Litera- 
ture. 2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 4 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Keyboard music of selected composers, single genres, 
or specific national schools. 

MUSI 8310. Special Topics in Musicology. 3 hours. 
Repeatable lor maximum 12 hours credit. 
Changing topics, such as individual composers, music 
notation, and special research areas 

MUSI 8320. Chamber Music Literature. 3 hours. 
Major chamber music works from the Italian trio 
sonata to the present day. 

MUSI 8330. Performance Practice. 3 hours. 
Performance practice in a variety of style periods in- 
volving treatises, scores, and recordings. 

MUSI 8340. American Music. 3 hours. 

Art music and vernacular traditions of the United 

States. 



MUSI 8350. Musicology Proseminar. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Research seminar in musicology; topics based upon 
current trends in musicological research. 

MUSI 8810. Applied Music Instruction. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 27 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Applied music instruction at the doctoral level. 

MUSI 8910. Doctoral Recital. 1-3 hours Repeatable 

for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Solo, chamber, or lecture recital in partial fulfillment 

of requirements for the doctoral degree. 

MUSI 8920. Doctoral Conducting Project. 1-3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit. 
Preparation and presentation of doctoral conducting 
recital. 

MUSI 8990. Doctoral Seminar. 1 hour. Repeatable 
for maximum 6 hours credit. 

Seminar on a variety of topics of interest to music doc- 
toral students. 

MUSI 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-10 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

MUSI 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 112 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 33 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Philosophy 



Robert G. Burton, Head 

Charles B. Cross, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2653 
(Peabody Hall) 

The department offers a comprehensive pro- 
gram, covering the major areas of philosophical 
study, leading to the MA and the PhD degrees. 
Various approaches, including historical studies, 
linguistic analysis, logical analysis, and phe- 
nomenology arc represented by the faculty. 
Though the department allows students to pur- 
sue their own interests in diverse areas, our spe- 
cial strengths lie in metaphysics, moral and 
political philosophy, and theory of knowledge 
and philosophy of mind. The graduate program 
is designed to give broad and thorough training 
in these basic areas of philosophy, as well as the 
opportunity for special study in the area of spe- 



202 / The University of Georgia 



Philosophy 



cialization of interest to the student. Admission 
to the PhD program presupposes a thorough 
background in the history of philosophy. Re- 
stricted admission encourages close student-fac- 
ulty relationships. Preparation for teaching is 
considered an integral part of the PhD program. 

For the MA degree, reading knowledge of one 
foreign language is required; for the PhD, one 
foreign language is required and a second lan- 
guage and/or knowledge of areas cognate to phi- 
losophy may be required. 

Additional information about the department 
can be found on our web site: http://www.phil. 
uga.edu. 

PHIL 4000/6000. Plato. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3000. 
The major writings of Plato. 

PHIL 4010/6010. Aristotle. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3000. 
The major writings of Aristotle. 

PHIL 4020/6020. Medieval Philosophy. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3000. 
The major figures of the medieval period in western 
philosophy, including Augustine and Aquinas. 

PHIL 4030/6030. Continental Rationalism. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3010. 
Continental Rationalism, focusing on evaluating the 
principal writings of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. 

PHIL 4040/6040. British Empiricism. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3010. 
British Empiricism, focusing on evaluating the princi- 
pal writings of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 

PHIL 4050/6050. Kant. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3010 or PHIL 3020. 

The major writings of Immanuel Kant. 

PHIL 4060/6060. Hegel. 3 hours 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3010 or PHIL 3020. 

The major writings of G.W.F. Hegel. 

PHIL 4070/6070. Nineteenth-Century European 
Philosophy. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3010 or PHIL 3020. 
Works of some major nineteenth-century philoso- 
phers, typically organized around a theme. Philoso- 
phers to be studied may include Mill, Bentham, Frege, 
Brentano, Schopenhauer, Fichte, Schelling, and Niet- 
zsche. 

PHIL 4080/6080. Classical American Philosophy. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite Permission of depart- 
ment. 

The major writings of C.S. Pierce. William James, and 
John Dewey and their influence Oil the development oi 
contemporary philosophy. 






PHIL 4090/6090. Contemporary Continental Tra- 
dition. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3000 or PHIL 3010 
or PHIL 3030. 

Writings from the early phenomenologists, existential- 
ists, contemporary Marxists and their successors, such 
as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Camus, Sartre, 
Marcuse, and Habermas. 

PHIL 4100/6100. Contemporary Analytic Tradi- 
tion. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3010 or PHIL 3600 
or PHIL 3610. 

The development of contemporary analytical philoso- 
phy from the turn of the century to the present. Read- 
ings will be from philosophers such as Russell, Moore, 
Wittgenstein, Carnap, Ryle, Austin, Quine, and Straw- 
son. 

PHIL 4210/6210. Social and Political Philosophy. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 2200. 

The nature and function of society and the state, 

human freedom and rights, and the bases of social and 

political obligations. 

PHIL(EETH) 4220/6220. Environmental Ethics. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 2200 or permission 

of department. 

Major professional and nonprofessional writings in the 

field of environmental ethics. 

PHIL 4230/6230. Aesthetics. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2200 
or PHIL 2400. 

Philosophical theories about the arts; for example, 
painting, literature, and music. Questions to be ad- 
dressed include: what makes art art? and what are ap- 
propriate criteria of good art? Attention may also be 
given to such topics as the function of art in society. 

PHIL 4240/6240. Philosophy of Law. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission of depart- 
ment. 

The nature and function of law, with emphasis on the 
interpretation and application of the law in the judicial 
process. Readings in classical and contemporars 
schools of the philosophy of law. 

PHIL(EETH) 4250/6250. Technology and Values. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: Permission ol depart 
ment. 

Technology in its broadest human context, with em 
phasis on the mutual influence between means and 
ends and the impact of technology on shaping the be- 
liefs and attitudes oi a civilization. Includes alternative 
assessments oftechnolog) and illustrates with specific 
crucial issues of our lime 

PHIL(UNG) 4300/6300. Philosophy of Language. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite Permission of depart- 
ment 



Graduate St hoot Description of < - mj r< n 203 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Topics such as formal and ordinary languages, mean- 
ing, reference, truth, definition, analyticity, ambiguity, 
metaphor, symbolism, and the uses of language. 

PHIL 4310/6310. Philosophy of Mind. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 3000 or PHIL 3010 
or PHIL 3020 or PHIL 3610. 

The philosophical implications of alternative ap- 
proaches to psychology such as the behavioral, the 
psychoanalytic, the phenomenological, with particular 
attention to such problematic areas as the nature and 
validation of psychological concepts, law, and theo- 
ries, and the knowledge of other minds. 

PHIL 4400/6400. History of Natural Science. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2400. 
Major physical, biological, and cosmological theories 
and their philosophic import, sixth century B.C. to the 
present. 

PHIL 4410/6410. Philosophy of Natural Science. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2400. 
The logical structure of scientific hypotheses and/or 
laws, and the problems of their meaning and confir- 
mation; the general patterns of scientific explanation; 
and the ideals of prediction and control. 

PHIL 4420/6420. Philosophy of Social Science. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2200 
or PHIL 2400. 

The methods and problems of inductive reasoning, in- 
cluding the nature of probable inference, techniques of 
verification, and the structure of scientific explanation, 
with special reference to the social sciences. 

(PHIL)RELI 4500/6500. Philosophy of Religion. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: RELI 1003 or PHIL 1000 
or PHIL 2200 or PHIL 2400. 

The meaning, nature, and validity of religious dis- 
course, beliefs, and practices, involving theories con- 
cerning the existence and nature of God and 
humanity's relation to God. 

PHIL(LING) 4510/6510. Deductive Systems. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL 2500. 
Symbolic-mathematical logic, examining the proposi- 
tional and predicate calculi, with emphasis on prob- 
lems in translation and formalization and topics in the 
philosophy of logic and mathematics. 

PHIL(LING) 4520/6520. Model Theory. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHIL(LING) 4510/6510. 
Formal semantics for sentential and first-order predi- 
cate logic, including both soundness and completeness 
results for first-order logic. Additional topics may in- 
clude Goedel's incompleteness results, the Skolem- 
Lowenheim theorem, or possible world semantics lor 
modal logics. 



PHIL 4530/6530. Philosophy of Mathematics. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (PHIL 1000 or PHIL 
2400) and PHIL 2500. 

The philosophical issues associated with mathematical 
inquiry, including, perhaps, the existence and nature of 
mathematical objects, the epistemology of mathemati- 
cal truths, the character of mathematical proof, and the 
foundations of mathematics. 

(PHIL)CSCI 4550/6550. Artificial Intelligence. 

3 hours. 

The artificial intelligence approach to modeling cogni- 
tive processes. Topics include an introduction to 
heuristic methods, problem representation and search 
methods, classic AI techniques, and a review of the 
controversial issues of the AI paradigm of cognition as 
computation. 

(PHIL)HIST 4860/6860. History, History of Philos- 
ophy, Philosophy. 3 hours. 

Historians and philosophers differ in the source of ev- 
idence and arguments they use and in the standards to 
which they appeal. Nonetheless, works in each of 
these fields raise questions relevant to the other field. 
The purpose of this course is to explore the main rela- 
tionships between these two fields. 

PHIL 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

PHIL 7010. Teaching Philosophy. 1 hour. 2 hours lab 
per week. 

Materials, techniques, and objectives for teaching un- 
dergraduate courses in philosophy. Particular attention 
to presenting lectures, leading discussions, construct- 
ing examinations, and instructional evaluations. 

PHIL 7300. Master's Thesis. 1-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

PHIL 8000. Seminar in History of Philosophy. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Philosophical topics and problems as found in the 
works of ancient, medieval, and modem philosophers. 

PHIL 8200. Seminar in Ethics. 3 hours. Repeatable 

for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Problems and topics in classical and contemporary 

moral philosophy. 

PHIL 8210. Seminar in Political Philosophy. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Problems and topics in classical and contemporary po- 
litical philosophy. 



204 / The University of Georgia 



Physics and Astronomy 



PHIL(LING) 8300. Seminar in the Philosophy of 

Language. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours 

credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

The original course materials dealing with such topics 

as formal and ordinary languages, meaning, reference, 

descriptions, truth, definition, analyticity, speech acts, 

and the uses of language. 

PHIL 8310. Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
One or more central problems in the philosophy of 
mind such as the mind-body problem, intentionality, 
and metal causation. 

PHIL 8400. Seminar in Philosophy of Science. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Basic concepts in science, such as explanation, de- 
scription, prediction, law, cause, theory, confirmation, 
probability, observation, and measurement. 

PHIL 8500. Seminar in Problems of Logic. 3 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PHIL(LING) 4510/6510. 
Modal logic, epistemic logic, temporal logic, condi- 
tional logic, nonmontonic logic, the problem of induc- 
tion, and the logic of belief revision. 

PHIL 8600. Seminar in Metaphysics. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Various metaphysical systems and related problems. 

PHIL 8610. Seminar in Epistemology. 3 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Various theories of knowledge and related problems. 

PHIL(RELI) 8630. Seminar in Philosophy of Reli- 
gion. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Major topics in the philosophy of religion, such as the 
nature and existence of God, the problem of evil, and 
the character of religious discourse. 

(PHIL)CSCI 8650. Logic and Logic Programming. 

4 hours. 

Prerequisite: [CSCI(ARTI) 4540/6540 and PHIL 
(LING) 6430] or permission of department. 
Theoretical foundations of automated reasoning and 
logic programming. Topics covered include proposi- 
tion!] logic, predicate logic, first-order models, resolu- 
tion principles, logic programming paradigms, 
nonmonotonic reasoning. 

PHIL 8700. Problems and Topics in Philosophy. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Philosophical positions and problems. 

PHIL 8800. Readings and Research in Special 
Problems in Philosophy. 3 hours Repeatable for 
maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 



Directed reading and research in philosophy in areas 
of a student's special interest. 

PHIL 9000. Doctoral Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

PHIL 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours. Re- 
peatable for maximum 30 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Physics and 
Astronomy 



F. Todd Baker, Head 

Jean-Pierre Caillault, Graduate Coordinator, 

542-2818 
(Physics Building) 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy of- 
fers graduate work leading to the MS and PhD 
degrees in physics. The major research in the de- 
partment is conducted in the following fields: 
astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, nu- 
clear physics, condensed matter physics, statisti- 
cal mechanics, optics, relativity, high energy 
physics, and mathematical physics. Experimen- 
tal research is conducted in on-campus laborato- 
ries for atomic and molecular physics, laser 
spectroscopy of solids, and material synthesis. 
Research involving the application of computer 
simulational techniques to astrophysics, con- 
densed matter physics, material science, and 
high energy physics is conducted at the Center 
for Simulational Physics. Experimental research 
in intermediate-energy nuclear physics is per- 
formed at off-campus accelerator laboratories in 
the U.S., France, Canada, and Japan. Astronom- 
ical research is conducted with the facilities of 
the National Radio and Optical Observatories, 
and those of NASA. Research in the above areas 
is aided by the campus computing facilities. 

Prospective students desiring financial aid 
should submit all application material by Febni- 
ar\ 15. No foreign language 1^ required for the 
master's or doctoral degrees. 



Graduate & h<><>! Description of Course* 205 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



Physics 



PHYS 4000/6000. Physics Seminar. 1 hour Repeat- 
able for maximum 3 hours credit. 
Discussion of contemporary topics in physics. 

PHYS 4101/6101. Theoretical Mechanics I. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2700. 
Kinematics and dynamics of a particle and of systems 
of particles. 

PHYS 4102/6102. Theoretical Mechanics II. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 4101/6101. 
Mechanics of continuous media. Formal develop- 
ments in mechanics including the formulations of La- 
grange and Hamilton. 

PHYS 4201/6201. Electricity and Magnetism I. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: MATH 2700. 
Experimental foundations, including development of 
Maxwell's equations. 

PHYS 4202/6202. Electricity and Magnetism II. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 4201/6201. 

Applications of Maxwell's equations. 

PHYS 4300/6300. Thermodynamics and Kinetic 

Theory. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: (PHYS 1112-111 2L or 

PHYS 1212-1212L) and MATH 2700. 

The laws of thermodynamics and their application to 

physical systems. Kinetic theory. 

PHYS 4701/6701. Introductory Quantum Mechan- 
ics I. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 3700 and PHYS 
4101/6101. 

Fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. Solu- 
tions of the Schroedinger equation and their properties 
for simple systems are discussed. 

PHYS 4702/6702. Introductory Quantum Mechan- 
ics II. 3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 4701/6701. 
Perturbation theory and applications of quantum me- 
chanics. 

PHYS 4750/6750. Nuclear and Particle Physics. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 3700. 
Properties of nuclear and subnuclear systems. Funda- 
mental interactions between particles are treated. An 
introduction to the theory of the structure of baryons, 
mesons, and nuclei is presented along with quarks and 
the standard model. 

PHYS 4820/6820. Condensed Matter Physics. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: PHYS 3700 and PHYS 
4300/6300. 

Hlastic, thermal, electrical, magnetic and optical prop- 
erties of condensed matter. Covers such topics as crys- 
tal structure, symmetry operators. X-ray and neutron 



diffraction, lattice vibrations, thermal properties, elec- 
trons in metals and semiconductors, dielectric and op- 
tical properties, magnetism and magnetic resonance, 
superconductivity, and quantum fluids. 

PHYS 6670L. Experimental Physics. 3 hours. 

6 hours lab per week. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4701/6701. 

Laboratory course in which the student uses modem 

experimental techniques to investigate phenomena in 

atomic, molecular, nuclear, and solid state physics. 

PHYS 7000. Master's Research. 1-9 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

PHYS 7111-7111L. Introductory Physics for Teach- 
ers - Mechanics, Waves, Thermodynamics. 4 hours. 
3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1090 or MATH 1113. 
This course is designed to aid the introductory physics 
teacher in dealing with problems in mechanics, waves, 
and thermodynamics which arise in his/her teaching. 
The effective presentation of physical concepts in this 
area will be emphasized. Credit is limited to students 
working for degrees in education. 

PHYS 7112-7112L. Introductory Physics for Teach- 
ers - Electricity and Magnetism, Optics, Modern 
Physics. 4 hours. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 711 1-71 11L. 
This course is designed to aid the introductory physics 
teacher in dealing with problems in electricity and 
magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics which arise in 
his/her teaching. The effective presentation of physical 
concepts in this area will be emphasized. Credit is lim- 
ited to students working for degrees in education. 

PHYS 7300. Master's Thesis. 1 -9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction of the major profes- 
sor. 

PHYS 8011. Classical Mechanics I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 4102/6102. 
Corequisite: PHYS 8401. 

The mechanics of particles and rigid bodies is devel- 
oped using generalized coordinates, D'Alembert's 
principle and Hamilton's principle. Symmetry princi- 
ples and conservation laws are emphasized. 

PHYS 8012. Classical Mechanics II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8011. 
Corequisite: PHYS 8402. 

The mechanics of small oscillations and continuous 
media is developed using Hamilton's principle. Other 
topics covered include: special relativity, Hamilton's 
equations of motion, canonical transformations, 
Hamilton-Jacobi Theory and an introduction to non- 
linear systems. 



206 / The University of Georgia 



Physics and Astronomy 



PHYS 8101. Quantum Mechanics L 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 4702/6702 and PHYS 8012 and 
PHYS 8402. 

The basic principles of quantum mechanics and their 
applications to problems in modern physics. Topics 
covered include principles of wave mechanics, central 
forces and angular momentum, three dimensional 
bound state problems and scattering theory, spin. 

PHYS 8102. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8101. 

The basic principles of quantum mechanics and their 
applications to problems in modem physics. Topics 
covered include quantum dynamics, identical parti- 
cles, symmetries, time-independent and time-depen- 
dent perturbation theory. 

PHYS 8150. Advanced Quantum Theory. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 8102. 

Relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field 

theory. 

PHYS 8171. Quantum Theory of Scattering with 

Applications I. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 8102. 

Concepts and applications of potential scattering. Both 

short-range and long-range potentials are treated. 

PHYS 8172. Quantum Theory of Scattering with 
Applications II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8171. 

Scattering and reactions involving identical particles 
and composite systems. Elastic, inelastic, and re- 
arrangement processes are treated. 

PHYS 8201. Advanced Electromagnetic Theory I. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4202/6202 and PHYS 8402. 
A study of classical electrodynamics. Topics include 
development of Maxwell's electromagnetic field equa- 
tions and the Lorentz force equation, electrostatics and 
magnetostatics. 

PHYS 8202. Advanced Electromagnetic Theory II. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 8201. 

A study of classical electrodynamics. Topics include 
development of Maxwell's electromagnetic field equa- 
tions and the Lorentz force equation, electrostatics and 
magnetostatics, time-varying fields, conservation 
laws, radiating systems, and electromagnetic waves. 

PHYS 8251. Relativity I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Einstein's general theory of relativity. Topics include 
mathematical background, fundamental field equa- 
tions of Einstein's theory of gravitation and their phe- 
nomenological extension to include electromagnetic 
phenomena. 

PHYS 8252. Relativity II. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. 

Einstein's general theory of relativity. Topics include 

fundamental field equations of Einstein's theory of the 

total field, particle structure and motion in general rel- 



ativistic theories, experimental and observational tests 
of the theories. 

PHYS 8301. Statistical Mechanics I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8102. 

The foundation and development of statistical me- 
chanics in classical and quantum physics and its rela- 
tionship to thermodynamics. 

PHYS 8302. Statistical Mechanics II. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8301. 

Applications of statistical mechanics to some funda- 
mental problems in physics, astrophysics and other 
sciences. 

PHYS 8321. Advanced Statistical Mechanics I. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8302 or permission of department. 
Advanced topics in statistical mechanics, especially 
those which have contributed to recent rapid progress 
in the modern many-body problem. Analytical and 
other advanced mathematical techniques will be em- 
phasized. 

PHYS 8322. Advanced Statistical Mechanics II. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8302 or permission of department. 
Recent topics in advanced statistical mechanics of spe- 
cial significance. Special mathematical techniques 
such as matrix polynomials and diagonalization, trans- 
fer matrix method and mapping, chaotic dynamical 
systems, elliptical integrals will be discussed in detail. 

PHYS 8401. Methods of Mathematical Physics I. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 2700. 

Treatment of mathematical methods necessary for 
solving problems in physics. Techniques from com- 
plex analysis, integral transforms, linear vector spaces 
and ordinary differential equations are covered. 

PHYS 8402. Methods of Mathematical Physics II. 

3 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 8401. 

Treatment of mathematical methods necessary for 
solving problems in physics. Techniques from special 
functions, partial differential equations. Green's func- 
tions and the calculus of variations are developed and 
applied. 

PHYS 8501. Structure and Spectra of Atoms and 
Molecules I. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8102. 

Atomic and molecular physics with emphasis on cur- 
rent research in the structure and spectra of atomic g) s- 
terns, especially non-relati\istic descriptions 

PHYS 8502. Structure and Spectra of Atoms and 
Molecules II. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PHYS 8501. 

Atomic and molecular physics with emphasis on cur- 
rent research in the structure and spectra ot molecular 
systems, and relativistic descriptions of atoms and 
molecules. 



(.iraJuatf Sihiutl l)t\cnpti<m of ( .• < 207 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



PHYS 8601. Computer Simulation Methods in 
Physics. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per 
week. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4300/6300 or permission of de- 
partment. 

The use of computer simulation methods to treat oth- 
erwise intractable problems. Emphasis will be placed 
on many-body problems and the techniques will in- 
clude Monte Carlo and spin dynamics. 

PHYS 8602. Computer Simulations of Materials. 

3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8601 or permission of department. 
Computer simulation algorithms including molecular 
dynamics and quantum molecular dynamics tech- 
niques. Student must write programs and analyze data 
for different ensembles. 

PHYS 8730. Nuclear Theory. 3 hours. Repeatable for 
maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8102. 

Analysis of symmetry principles, nuclear forces, nu- 
clear shell model, nuclear and nucleon structure and 
nucleonic degrees of freedom. 

PHYS 8821. Advanced Solid State Physics I. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8301. 

Quantum theory of solids. Current and fundamental 
topics in solid state physics, including the theory of 
electrons and phonons in metals, semi-conductors and 
insulators, will be covered. 

PHYS 8822. Advanced Solid State Physics II. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 8821. 

Quantum theory of solids. Current and fundamental 
topics in solid state physics, including magnetism, op- 
tical and transport properties of solids and supercon- 
ductivity, will be covered. 

PHYS 8900. Advanced Topics. 3-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Current and advanced topics in physics and astron- 
omy. 

PHYS 8990. Introduction to Research. 13 hours. 
Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Active research areas in physics and astronomy pro- 
vided by faculty members who are actively engaged in 
research. 

PHYS 9000. Doctoral Research. 19 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 45 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

PHYS 9300. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-9 hours Re- 
peatable for maximum 9 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Dissertation writing under the direction of the major 
professor. 



Astronomy 



ASTR 4010/6010. Astrophysics I. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ASTR 1010 and ASTR 
1020 and PHYS 3700 and PHYS 4101/6101. 
Stellar astrophysics, stellar structure and atmospheres, 
formation of spectral lines and spectral classification, 
stellar evolution from star formation to planetary neb- 
ulae and supemovae and the resulting compact ob- 
jects. 

ASTR 4020/6020. Astrophysics II. 3 hours. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ASTR 4010/6010. 
Systems of stars, the interstellar medium and stellar 
populations, galaxies, their classification and evolu- 
tion, extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. 

ASTR 4330/6330. Astronomy Seminar. 1 hour. Re- 
peatable for maximum 4 hours credit. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: ASTR 1010 and ASTR 
1020. 

Undergraduate prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 3010 
or ASTR 3020 or ASTR 4010/6010 or ASTR 4020/ 
6020. 

Seminar on contemporary topics in astronomy and as- 
trophysics. 

ASTR 8070. Stellar Structure and Evolution. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2700 and PHYS 4101/6101 and 
PHYS 4201/6201 and PHYS 4701/6701. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 4202/6202 or 
PHYS 4702/6702. 

The internal structure and evolution of single and bi- 
nary stars from formation to supernova. The equations 
of stellar structure and their numerical solution are dis- 
cussed. Recent developments in stellar evolution the- 
ory, including brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant 
planets are presented. 

ASTR 8080. Stellar Atmospheres. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: ASTR 8070. 

The atmospheres of stars and giant planets, the equa- 
tion of state, the transfer of radiation in stellar atmos- 
pheres, and the interaction of radiation and matter. The 
equations of stellar atmospheres and their numerical 
solution are derived and results of modern calculations 
are presented. Recent developments in stellar atmos- 
phere theory, including brown dwarfs and extrasolar 
giant planets. 

ASTR 8090. The Interstellar Medium. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2700 and PHYS 4101/6101 and 
PHYS 4202/6202 and PHYS 4702/6702. 
Physical processes and phenomena in the interstellar 
medium including radiative processes; excitation, ion- 
ization, and dissociation of atoms and molecules; neu- 
tral hydrogen and galactic structure; equilibrium 
conditions in clouds; interactions of dust with gas and 
radiation; HII regions; molecular clouds; star forma- 
tion; planetary nebulae; supernova remnants; cosmic 
rays and the galactic magnetic field. 



208 / The University of Georgia 



Political Science 



ASTR 8110. Graduate Astronomy Seminar. 1 hour. 
Repeatable for maximum 4 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Professional skills such as writing and reviewing re- 
search and observing proposals, writing and refereeing 
research papers, making oral presentations of research 
and of journal articles, and writing brief newspaper 
and magazine summaries. 

ASTR 8270. Extragalactic Astronomy and Obser- 
vational Cosmology. 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: MATH 2700 and PHYS 4101/6101 and 
PHYS 4202/6202 and PHYS 4702/6702. 
Stellar content and dynamics of external galaxies, 
galaxy types and their evolution, Active Galactic Nu- 
clei and quasars. Topics to be discussed include the ex- 
tragalactic distance scale, clusters of galaxies, 
large-scale structure, cosmological models incorporat- 
ing the microwave background, the early universe and 
galaxy formation. 



Political Science 



Thomas P. Lauth, Head 

Brad Lockerbie, Graduate Coordinator, (MA, 

PhD), 542-2932 
Jerome S. Legge, Jr., Graduate Coordinator, 

(MPA, DPA), 542-2932 • 
(Baldwin Hall) 

The Department of Political Science offers pro- 
grams leading to MA, MPA, PhD, and DPA de- 
grees. The MA and PhD programs are oriented 
to the systematic study and analysis of political 
phenomena. For the PhD program, candidates 
are required to complete three courses in re- 
search methods and statistics offered within the 
department. They choose three fields from the 
seven offered for comprehensive examinations. 
These include: American politics; public admin- 
istration; public policy; political theory; com- 
parative politics; international relations; and 
law, courts, and the judicial process. 

The purpose of the Master of Public Adminis- 
tration degree is to educate individuals for ad- 
ministrative and managerial careers in 
government. It is designed for those planning to 
enter or who are already a part of the public ser- 
vice. The Doctor of Public Administration pro- 
gram offers a research degree designed for 
students interested in academic or public sen ice 
careers. For further information, our e-mail ad- 
dress is polgrad@archcs.uga.edu. 



POLS 4370/6370. Politics of Industrialized Democ- 
racies. 3 hours. 

Not open to students with credit in POLS 4370H. 
Undergraduate prerequisite: POLS 1 101-1 101 D. 
The political economy, institutions, and cultures of the 
major capitalist countries in Europe, East Asia, and 
North America. State-society relations and formal and 
informal political institutions, such as political parties, 
interest groups, electoral systems, and democratic rep- 
resentation. 

POLS 4520/6520. Electoral Behavior. 3 hours 
Undergraduate prerequisite: POLS 1101-1 101 D. 
Factors which contribute to electoral choice and the 
dynamics of voting in the American political system. 

POLS 4610/6610. The United States Presidency. 

3 hours. 

Undergraduate prerequisite: POLS 1101-1 101 D. 
The president of the United States, including the pres- 
ident's constitutional position, theories of executive 
dominance and executive privilege, the president's at- 
tempt to control the executive branch, and presiden- 
tial-congressional relations. 

POLS 6000. American Political Thought. 3 hours. 
Ideas about human nature and government that have 
shaped political practice and debate in America. The 
principles of the Declaration of Independence and the 
Constitution as developed especially by Jefferson, 
Madison, and Hamilton, and the interpretation of these 
principles by such statesmen as Lincoln and Wilson. 
Other topics include Black political thought and cur- 
rent liberal-conservative debate. 

POLS 6020. Political Philosophy: Hobbes to the 
Twentieth Century. 3 hours. 

Development of modern political philosophy through 
the analysis of selected works of such writers as 
Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, and Ni- 
etzsche. 

POLS 6040. Problems in Democratic Theory. 

3 hours. 

Major problems that arise in theoretical discussions of 
democracy, such as the nature of democratic govern- 
ment, its purposes, its justification, its limitations, and 
the conditions necessary for its maintenance. 

POLS 6100. Pre-Seminar in American Politics. 

3 hours. 

The study of American politics. Recommended for 

students considering advanced work in the field. 

POLS 6140. The Legislative Process. 3 hours 

The United States Congress with emphasis on recruit- 
ment and composition of leadership, procedures, and 
the role of parties and interest groups. Recent changes 
in the Congress will he examined in light ot theories of 
representation. 

POLS 617(1. American Political Parties. 3 hours 
Research on political panics m the United States, uuh 
an emphasis on empirical analysis and theories of par- 
ties. 



Graduate School Description <>! < -<> 4 J 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



POLS 6200. Pre-Seminar in International Rela- 
tions. 3 hours. 

Realist, idealist, and institutionalist approaches to the 
study of International Relations. Special emphasis on 
applications to both historical and contemporary cases. 

POLS 6210. International Organization. 3 hours. 
The role of international institutions to overcome ob- 
stacles of international cooperation. International 
regimes, formal as well as informal, and their capacity 
to induce cooperation. International regimes are un- 
derstood as political institutions designed to solve col- 
lective action problems and reduce transaction costs 
among states to such degrees that international coop- 
eration becomes possible. 

POLS 6220. International Law. 3 hours. 
Functioning of the legal structures in the international 
system with special emphasis on the relation between 
law and politics. 

POLS 6230. International Conflict. 3 hours. 
Major theories of international conflict. The objective 
is to explore the logical and empirical foundations for 
the key hypotheses linking systemic, structural, coali- 
tional, and individual factors to decisions regarding 
war and peace. Also, introduces the different types of 
methodologies currently used in the quantitative study 
of international relations. 

POLS 6240. International Political Economy. 

3 hours. 

Various aspects of the international economy, both the- 
oretical and practical, essential to an understanding of 
modern diplomacy and the conduct of foreign affairs. 

POLS 6250. American Foreign Policy. 3 hours. 
History and content of American foreign policy as well 
as the foreign policy making process. Special empha- 
sis on the role of individuals and nongovernment or- 
ganizations in making foreign policy in a mature 
democracy. 

POLS 6350. Comparative Analysis and Method. 

3 hours. 

Comparative approaches to political science. The tran- 
sition from feudalism to capitalism, state building, and 
the interaction between political institutions and cul- 
tures in various polities. Methods and approaches in- 
vestigated include structuralism, functionalism, 
culturalist perspectives, rational choice, institutionalist 
frameworks, and the perennial issue of what consti- 
tutes the "state." 

POLS 6380. Russian and East European Politics. 

3 hours. 

Domestic and international politics in Russia and se- 
lected East European states (e.g., Belarus and 
Ukraine). 

POLS 6390. Far Eastern Political Systems. 3 hours. 
Social, cultural, and political processes in contrasting 
Far Eastern nations including China, Japan, and 
Korea. Both domestic and international issues will be 
examined. 



POLS 6440. Constitutional Law: Powers. 3 hours. 
The substantive law of separation of powers; powers 
among branches of government and between national 
and state governments defined; historical coverage is 
emphasized. 

POLS 6460. Constitutional Law: Rights and Liber- 
ties. 3 hours. 

The substantive constitutional law of rights and liber- 
ties, with emphasis on political freedom of speech and 
press, religious freedom, freedom from discrimination, 
and protection of due process in criminal justice. 

POLS 6490. Administrative Law. 3 hours. 
The legal principles and practical doctrines involved 
in the work of administrative agencies, vested with 
quasi-legislative or quasi-judicial powers. 

POLS 6910. Public Administration and Democ- 
racy. 3 hours. 

Administrative organization, relations, and controls 
facing the contemporary public management in the 
United States. The institutional, political, and norma- 
tive environment of the public manager in democratic 
society. Among the questions considered is the prob- 
lem of reconciling bureaucratic government and de- 
mocratic principles. 

POLS 6920. Public Personnel Administration. 

3 hours. 

Procedures and problems of governmental personnel 
administration. Included in the topics are classifica- 
tion, performance appraisal, hiring practices, affirma- 
tive action, and pay equity. Studies of governmental 
agencies are employed to give the students first-hand 
knowledge of governmental personnel administration. 

POLS 6930. Public Financial Administration. 

3 hours. 

Activities involved in the collection, custody and ex- 
penditure of public revenue, such as the assessment 
and collection of taxes, public borrowing and debt ad- 
ministration, the preparation and enactment of the 
budget, financial accountability and the audit. In addi- 
tion, the course covers politics of the budgetary 
process. 

POLS 6960. Organizational Theory. 3 hours. 
Major concepts and theories associated with the mod- 
ern public organization. Organizational environments, 
goals and effectiveness, strategy and decision-making, 
structure and design, communication, leadership, indi- 
vidual work behaviors, and other topics. The implica- 
tions of the public sector context and political 
environments for these topics. 

POLS 6980. Law, Ethics, and Professionalism in 
Public Administration. 1 hour. 
An exposition of three elements of public administra- 
tion: the legal environment, the subject of ethics, and 
a consideration of the extent to which public adminis- 
tration can be considered a profession. 



210 / The University of Georgia 



Political Science 



POLS 6990. Communication Skills for Public Man- 
agers. 1 hour. 

The importance of interpersonal and group skills in 
public sector management. Students will use the pub- 
lic sector assessment center to assess their communi- 
cation skills, both oral and written. 

POLS 7000. Master's Research. 1-6 hours. Repeat- 
able for maximum 15 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Research while enrolled for a master's degree under 
the direction of faculty members. 

POLS 7010. Research Design. 3 hours 
Basic scientific methods, broadly defined, to include 
problems of definition, concept formation, hypothesis 
testing, explanation and prediction, and theory con- 
struction. 

POLS 7030. Methodology in Political Science. 

3 hours. 

The use of quantitative methods in political science 
research. Topics range from descriptive statistics 
through regression analysis. 

POLS 7040. Quantitative Methods. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: POLS 7010 and POLS 7030. 
Multiple regression analysis and related techniques. 
Focus on assumptions of OLS and applications to po- 
litical science research. Topics include interactives, 
specifications, nonlinearities, error diagnostics, and in- 
troduction to time series and causal modeling. 

POLS 7060. Writing for Publication in Political 

Science. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 

credit. 

Preparation and revision of manuscripts suitable for 

publication in political science journals. 

POLS 7110. Research Methods in Public Adminis- 
tration. 3 hours. 

Basic research methods and their use in public admin- 
istration from the standpoint of both public policy and 
public management. Topics covered include the scien- 
tific method, experimental and quasi-experimental de- 
signs, sampling, interviewing, and questionnaire 
construction. 

POLS 7120. Data Applications in Public Adminis- 
tration. 3 hours 

Applications of data analysis techniques to problems 
in public management and program evaluation. Spe- 
cial attention is devoted to familiarity with computer 
hardware and software to solve public sector prob- 
lems. Topics include cross-tabulation, difference of 
means testing, and regression analysis. 

POLS 7300. Master's Thesis. 3-9 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum IS hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 
Thesis writing under the direction ol the major profes- 
sor. 

POLS 7350. Internship in Government 3-6 hours 

Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit 
Prerequisite: Permission of department 



Integrates government employment experience into 
the curriculum of the Master of Public Administration 
degree program. 

POLS 7380. Ethics in Public Administration. 3 hours. 
Leading ethical issues that arise in public administra- 
tion practice and consideration of the sources to which 
the public administrator can look for guidance in deal- 
ing with these issues. 

POLS 7500. Local Government Management. 

3 hours. 

Description and analysis of the practice of local gov- 
ernment management. Key issues in several functional 
areas of local government service are highlighted. 

POLS 7520. Urban Policy. 3 hours. 
Major federal, state, and local policies affecting Amer- 
ican urban areas. Major topics include local govern- 
ment finance, service delivery, land use, and urban 
economic development. 

POLS 7540. Productivity Improvement in Local 
Government. 3 hours. 

The concept of productivity, its importance in the 
public sector, principal techniques used to improve 
productivity in local government, and barriers to pro- 
ductivity improvement initiatives. 

POLS 7560. Special Topics in Urban Administra- 
tion. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Topics in the area of urban policy and administration. 
The focus of the course will shift depending on the in- 
terest of the instructor and may include such topics as 
land use policy and regulation, urban service delivery, 
and local government reform. 

POLS 7620. Policy Analysis. 3 hours. 

Theoretical approaches and concepts associated with 

the empirical analysis of public policies. 

POLS 7630. Policy Implementation. 3 hours. 
Public policy implementation literature with emphasis 
given to the major substantive and methodological 
issues driving this emerging field of public policy 
analysis. Bureaucracy's role in policy process, imple- 
mentation analysis, and theories and methods for 
studying policy implementation. 

POLS 7640. Program Evaluation. 3 hours. 
The theoretical perspectives associated with program 
evaluation; design and measurement procedures; types 
of evaluative research; and the management of politi- 
cal and ethical problems associated with pe rf orming 
and utili/ing evaluation research. 

POLS 7650. Public Policy Seminar 3 hours 
Research seminar on the major analytical techniques 
and theoretical approaches to decision-making in sub- 
stantia- public polic) areas (e.g., environmental pro- 
tection, health care, natural resources.) 

POLS 7660. (Government and Business. 3 hours 
Economic, social, and political bases for governmeoi 

intervention in market economies, comparative and/or 
American. Evolution of and justification tor regulators 



Graduate School Dest ription <>/ ( trst 211 



The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 



policies, the theoretical debate surrounding govern- 
ment regulations, case studies of specific regulatory 
programs, and alternatives to regulation. 

POLS 7720. Public Personnel Problems in Public 
Agencies. 3 hours. 

Selected problems in public personnel administration, 
using case studies and other vehicles to simulate real- 
istic situations encountered in public agencies. Devel- 
oping analytical and behavioral skills applicable in 
public personnel administration. 

POLS 7830. Public Financial Management. 3 hours. 
Principal aspects of public financial management, 
including accounting, budgeting, capital budgeting, 
revenue forecasting, risk management, pension man- 
agement, and auditing. The focus of the course is on 
state and local finance. 

POLS 7840. Budget Practicum. 3 hours. 
The development of practical budgeting skills, with a 
special emphasis on budget development at the local 
level of government. Practical computer-based exer- 
cises enable the student to learn the logic of budget 
format and techniques of budget analysis. 

POLS 7900. Managing Volunteers in the Public and 
Nonprofit Sectors. 3 hours. 

Involvement of volunteers in government and non- 
profit organizations, especially in relation to deliver- 
ing services and maintaining the organization. Covers 
size, scope, significance, and challenges of the volun- 
tary sector, and functions of volunteer administration, 
including recruitment, screening, placement, recogni- 
tion, and evaluation. 

POLS 7930. Human Services Administration in 
Government. 3 hours. 

Special problems and processes involved in adminis- 
tering government and human service programs in 
health, welfare, disability, social security, and other 
service areas. Privatization of services will be consid- 
ered as an alternative service-delivery mechanism. 

POLS 7960. Organizational Behavior. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: POLS 6960. 

Focuses on four arenas or levels of management which 
must be integrated in the pursuit of public-sector ex- 
cellence. These arenas involve individuals, pairs of in- 
dividuals, supervisor/subordinates, and small groups. 
Institutional, behavioral, and psychological factors 
will be emphasized. 

POLS 8000. Strategy in Politics. 3 hours. 
Formal analysis of strategic behavior in various polit- 
ical settings. Factors leading to competition and coop- 
eration. Course content includes social choice theory, 
game theory, and other forms of rational choice analy- 
sis. 

POLS 8020. Formal Analysis. 3 hours 
Game theoretic analysis of politics. The role of infor- 
mation and uncertainty about preferences and beliefs. 



POLS 8040. Political Economy. 3 hours 

Various ways of analyzing the interaction between 

government and the economy. 

POLS 8050. Empirical Political Theory. 3 hours. 
Principal empirically oriented models and theories 
used in political science. 

POLS 8060. Systems of Political Philosophy. 

3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Writings of a leading political philosopher, aimed at 
seeing how the elements of his/her thought form a 
comprehensive and unified view of political life. 
Philosophers to be studied will include Plato, Aristo- 
tle, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, 
Rousseau, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. Classic works 
in American thought, such as the Federalist, will also 
be considered. 

POLS 8080. Problems in Political Philosophy. 

3 hours. 

Selected problems in political philosophy, including 
the nature of justice; the functions of government; the 
ground of legitimate authority; the scope of individual 
rights; the foundations of democratic government; po- 
litical obligation, civil disobedience, and revolution; 
the meaning of responsibility; and views of human na- 
ture and their political relevance. 

POLS 8090. Recent Political Thought. 3 hours. 
Important and influential recent political theories, in- 
cluding ideologies and scientific theories as well as 
contributions to political philosophy. The aim will be 
to understand both the approaches to political theory 
that have emerged in the contemporary period and the 
alternative interpretations that have been given of con- 
temporary individuals and society. 

POLS 8110. Research on Electoral Behavior. 3 hours. 
Factors which contribute to electoral choice and the 
dynamics of voting in the American political system. 

POLS 8120. Southern Politics. 3 hours. 
The politics of individual states, the emergence of the 
Republican Party, Black mobilization, the conse- 
quences of reapportionment, and selected civil rights 
topics. 

POLS 8130. Government and Interest Groups. 

3 hours. 

Theories of interest group formation and maintenance. 
Lobbying and the role of interest groups in the United 
States governmental process, including traditional lit- 
erature on pluralism and interest groups as well as 
modern literature addressing traditional questions and 
problems. 

POLS 8140. The Legislative Process. 3 hours. 
The United States Congress, with emphasis on recruit- 
ment and composition of leadership, procedures, and 
the role of parties and interest groups. Recent changes 
in the Congress will be examined in light of theories of 
representation. 

POLS 8150. The United States Presidency. 3 hours. 
Powers of the United States Presidency. The Presi- 



212 / The University of Georgia 



Political Science 



dent's constitutional position, including theories of ex- 
ecutive dominance and executive privilege. Attention 
will also be given to the President's attempts to control 
the executive branch, presidential-congressional rela- 
tions, and the president's leadership over domestic and 
foreign policy. 

POLS 8160. Urban Politics. 3 hours. 
Local politics in the United States, including the social 
and economic development of cities, local government 
structures and their effects, the participation of indi- 
viduals and groups in urban politics, and major theo- 
retical perspectives in urban research. 

POLS 8170. American Political Parties. 3 hours 
Research on political parties in the United States, with 
an emphasis on empirical analysis and theories of par- 
ties. 

POLS 8180. Readings and Research in American 
Government. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 
9 hours credit. 

Independent study of selected topics and problems in 
American government. 

POLS 8190. Campaign Politics. 3 hours. 
Presidential selection processes, including impact of 
rules, money, media, and voting in primaries. Focus on 
campaign dynamics and strategy. 

POLS 8200. Special Topics in International Rela- 
tions. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours 
credit. 

The substance and method of selected topics in com- 
parative politics with an emphasis on theory, analysis, 
and praxis. Topics selected by the instructor vary from 
semester to semester. 

POLS 8260. Human Rights Policy. 3 hours. 
Human rights issue as it affects the process of policy 
formulation and implementation, including both do- 
mestic and international policy areas. 

POLS 8270. Politics of Trade and Security Policy. 

3 hours. 

Domestic and international politics of trade and secu- 
rity of selected countries, including the United States. 

POLS 8300. Selected Topics in Comparative Poli- 
tics. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 
Research oriented seminar of both the substance and 
method of selected topics in comparative politics, with 
an emphasis on theory, analysis, and praxis. Topics se- 
lected by the instructor vary from semester to semes 
ter. 

POLS 8310. Politics of Industrialized Democracies. 

3 hours. Repeatable tor maximum 6 hours credit. 
Political economy and institutions of the major capi- 
talist countries m Europe, East Asia, and North Amer- 
ica. Comparative analysis of both country-specific and 
function-specific criteria, such as state -SOCiet) rela 
tions and formal and informal political institutions. 



POLS 8330. Politics of Post-Communist Political 
Systems. 3 hours. 

Domestic and international politics of selected post- 
communist states. 

POLS 8340. Seminar in Developing Political Sys- 
tems. 3 hours. 

Theory of creating integrated, viable, modernizing po- 
litical systems in a world of economic inequalities. 
The focus is on the kinds of political institutions that 
can help manage the social stress of racial, ethnic, cul- 
tural, social, economic, technological, and ideological 
diversity. 

POLS 8410. Modern Legal Theory. 3 hours 
Theoretical approaches to analyzing the role of courts 
in a democracy, including methods for interpreting and 
applying constitutional and other legal texts. 

POLS 8430. Judicial Politics. 3 hours 
Judicial processes, policy-making, and policies, with 
emphasis on judicial selection, models of judicial de- 
cision-making, institutional constraints on judicial 
choice, and the implementation and impact of judicial 
decisions. 

POLS 8450. Special Topics in Law, Courts, and Ju- 
dicial Process. 3 hours. 

Special topics relating to law, courts, and the judicial 
process (such as "Women and the Law," "State Legal 
Systems," "Comparative Legal Systems," "Research 
Seminar on Trial Courts," etc.). 

POLS 8710. Problems in Public Administration. 

3 hours. 

Perennial and emerging research issues, perspectives, 

and controversies in the field of public administration. 

POLS 8720. Seminar in Selected Problems in Pub- 
lic Personnel Administration. 3 hours. Repeatable 
for maximum 9 hours credit. 

Special topics, such as public sector labor relations 
and collective bargaining: issues related to job analy- 
sis, evaluation, and compensation; or civil service re- 
form. 

POLS 8830. Seminar in Public Budgeting. 3 hours 
A doctoral seminar which considers the works of the 
major scholars in the field of public budgeting and fi- 
nance. 

POLS 8840. Metropolitan Fiscal Problems. 3 hours 
Public econonn of metropolitan areas and selected 
special metropolitan fiscal problems in the areas of 
public expenditures, revenues, and fiscal administra- 
tion. 

POLS 8850. Quantitative \nalvsis for Public Deci- 
sion-Making. 3 hours 

Qu an tit a t i ve analysis and techniques used in public 
sector decision-making. 

POLS 8940. Seminar in Comparative A